PLATINUM2024

Sahar Education

You can change the life of a girl and her community.

Seattle, WA   |  www.sahareducation.org

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Mission

Sahar partners with grassroots, locally-based organizations to create educational opportunities and safe learning spaces for girls and women in Afghanistan, empowering and inspiring children and their families to build peaceful, thriving communities.

Notes from the nonprofit

After the Taliban banned formal education for girls above 6th grade, Sahar has committed to finding innovative ways to promote girls' access to education in Afghanistan. It is now more important than ever to show up for girls' education in Afghanistan in any capacity possible.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Meetra Alokozay

Main address

Po Box 17672

Seattle, WA 98127 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Ayni Education International

EIN

26-4215477

NTEE code info

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

A quality education for every child in Afghanistan, fostering mutual respect and sustained peace.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Stealth Sisters

Our Sealth Sisters Program addresses vital skills for Afghan girls; including English, IT, and a focused approach around gender roles, health, and wellness within their communities. These courses are conducted in secret, with local schools, and serve girls who would not be able to attend school due to age restrictions by the Taliban. This program serves 20 girls at a time, preparing the students for future opportunities by addressing many barriers to continued education.

Graduates of this program have many avenues open to them including continuing education online, enrolling in other Sahar programs, and starting home-based businesses to teach those in their communities. Past graduates have reported that the women's empowerment focus helped build self-esteem and improved their ability to speak for themselves. This led them to work teaching local children, providing services online, and giving them the confidence to continue learning after completing the program.

Population(s) Served
Young women
Adolescent girls

Our program bridges the digital gap in Afghanistan by empowering women to learn and practice computer skills. We provide IT and coding courses, blending theoretical and practical lessons for hands-on experience. Courses run for three to six months and cover computer basics, MS Office, and website building. Our initiative enables girls to develop a solid foundation in these skills, preparing them for future careers. By supporting us, you're helping girls acquire essential skills for their future.

Girls in this program also study the women's empowerment curriculum which includes feminine hygiene, mental health, family planning, conflict resolution, childhood marriage prevention, confidence building, and other important topics that help students become more aware of their rights and place in a healthy society.

This program is conducted in secret locations and over 150 students are enrolled per session.

Population(s) Served
Adolescent girls
Adolescent girls
Victims of conflict and war
Extremely poor people
Low-income people

Women in this program are economically disadvantaged and will benefit from learning tailoring skills as well as learning to read and write. Additionally, women in this program will undergo a health and women's empowerment curriculum that has been shown to improve mental health, reduce early marriages, and prevent women's health complications due to misinformation. Every graduate of this program will be gifted a sewing machine, enabling them to start a home tailoring business.

The long-term impact of this program is to educate mothers and matriarchs enabling them to contribute financially to their families' well-being and reducing hunger in their families and communities. Additionally, women in these programs will leave with the understanding and means to prevent their daughters from being married early due to poverty and the ability to help contribute to their children's education. Lastly, each program graduate will go on to spread her knowledge to her community.

Population(s) Served
Women
Women
Women
Extremely poor people
Low-income people
Victims of conflict and war

This program aims to move forward towards achieving better health and education outcomes helping curb domestic violence by recognizing equality among both genders, promoting awareness of mental health and the implications of the notions of masculinity on wellbeing, and encouraging peaceful and cooperative coexistence in communities by developing leadership.

The program began with 2 classes of 20 high school boys who are eager to learn how they can contribute to healthy and thriving communities. Sahar has planned 3 rounds over a year which will serve and educate 120 students. This program was an active part of the Sahar mission until the Taliban takeover in 2021. We are pleased to have reinstated the program with new partners who are dedicated to improving the community support of womens rights.

Population(s) Served
Extremely poor people
Low-income people
Victims of conflict and war
Extremely poor people
Low-income people
Victims of conflict and war
Young men
Adolescent boys

Where we work

Awards

Afghan Women and Girls' Education NPO of the Year 2023

Nonprofit Organisation Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, Adolescent boys, Young men

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

With the Taliban takeover in 2021 and the subsequent ban on girls' education above 6th grade, all previous Sahar programs were halted. Our current programs sought to implement partners in 2022.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Sahar began as Journey with an Afghan School, a group founded to build bridges of understanding between the U.S. and Afghanistan for peace and cooperation in 2001. Through 2021, Sahar expanded: building schools, and computer centers, and managing teacher training programs in Northern Afghanistan. Sahar became a stand-alone non-profit in 2009 in order to expand and continue our efforts. Sahar has worked in this war zone for over two decades to increase the status of girls and women in Afghanistan through education, enabling them to participate actively in the social, political, and economic arenas in their communities.

Sahar approaches girls' education from multiple levels because we know that it takes a holistic approach to create real change. We work with partners in the U.S. and on the ground in Afghanistan to create safe learning spaces and, deliver educational and vocational training programs, and women empowerment and health workshops. These projects bolster local economies and strengthen communities, as well as fortify bonds between Afghanistan and the West.

After the Taliban banned formal education for girls above 6th grade, Sahar has committed to finding innovative ways to promote girls' access to education in Afghanistan. It is now more important than ever to show up for girls' education in Afghanistan in any capacity possible.

Sahar partners with grassroots, locally-based organizations to create educational opportunities and safe learning spaces for girls and women in Afghanistan, empowering and inspiring children and their families to build peaceful, thriving communities.

Sahar partners with locally based organizations in Afghanistan to provide educational opportunities to girls, women, and young men. These programs are developed by our senior leadership and board of directors in cooperation with the organizations that will administer the courses. Most of our courses are underground at this time, however, we are still growing and more partners and students are seeking us out as the ban on formal education continues in Afghanistan.

Since the Taliban takeover Sahar has established 4 programs serving different populations in Afghanistan. Two of the programs are underground schools for girls where they learn computers, English, and women's empowerment curriculum at secret locations. These programs give the girls skills and confidence to pursue other opportunities after graduation.

Another program for young men aims to move forward towards achieving better health and education outcomes helping curb domestic violence by recognizing equality among both genders, promoting awareness of mental health and the implications of the notions of masculinity on wellbeing, and encouraging peaceful and cooperative coexistence in communities by developing leadership.

The last program teaches illiterate women living in poverty to sew and read, enabling them to start home-tailoring businesses upon graduation. This program also covers all health and empowerment topics from our women's empowerment curriculum.

In 2023, over 400 students participated in Sahar programs and thousands more are hoping to enroll in the coming year.

Before the Taliban takeover in 2021, Sahar had built thirteen schools in Afghanistan, which educated 23,000 girls annually, expanding access to education for brighter futures for all Afghan children.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Sahar Education
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Sahar Education

Board of directors
as of 01/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Shinkai Hakimi

Community Hospital of Monterey Penninsula

Elizabeth Kronoff

Microsoft

Dave Miller

The Miller Hull Partnership

James Moore

Tracy Klinkroth

Epiphany Events

Nadia Hashimi

Author

Patti Meyers

Sahar Moshayedi

Saugus Union School District

Tom Grant

Numark Associates

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/29/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/26/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.