Coordinated Assistance Network, Inc

Inclusive Ingenuity

aka VeteransPlus and The Yellow Ribbon   |   Clearwater, FL   |  www.CANportal.org

Mission

The Coordinated Assistance Network (CAN) positions nonprofit services to challenge the long standing inequities of our nation, using technology as a catalyst for change.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Mr John Elliott Pickens III

Deputy Director

Christopher Fitzpatrick

Main address

2519 N McMullen Booth Rd 510

Clearwater, FL 33761 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

VeteransPlus

EIN

26-4702901

NTEE code info

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

Financial Counseling, Money Management (P51)

Management & Technical Assistance (U02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Covid-19 pandemic has not only placed a tremendous strain on non-profits, but households who are already challenged by socioeconomic differences and exacerbated when caregiving for someone else. Going forward, the CAN aims to expand its partnerships to be more inclusive for applicants and broaden the nonprofit landscape of services. All functions are performed within the highly secure, HIPAA and ADA compliant, & HUD Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) compliant cloud-based platform. Families who deal with socioeconomic inequities, can now experience a greater level of inclusion as the delivery of financial education expands through new partnerships established on the CAN. Impact-driven philanthropy is the practice of thoughtfully and intentionally using time, talents, and resources to advance equity, effectiveness, and systems change. These principles and practices are being developed, tested, and continually updated by the Impact-Driven collaborative that the CAN

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CANchange Coordinated Inclusion

The Coordinated Assistance Network (CAN) is a portal to meet the demands of the changing world and make other people’s lives better. The CAN is dedicated to closing the gap of health and financial equity through several pillars, which empowers service providers to deliver sound remedies no matter the applicants social, economic, demographic, or geographic variances. As a universal platform of services, the CAN will continue building the bedrock of a changing landscape for people through diversity, inclusion, and equity. The CAN believes the most critical platform advancements are those which current and future partners claim they need to be more effective. Each new addition to the CAN development provides new avenues for better delivery of services for nonprofits & individuals who otherwise would not have access to. Continuous technology development will prove to be more engaging for applicants to receive critical intervention and other services that require a more personal one on one approach. On the CAN, smaller organizations are empowered with capacity and become difference makers, and larger organizations find better system uses, while each have the ability to scale and deliver worthwhile programs.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status
Work status and occupations
Sexual identity
Health

1. The CAN is dedicated to closing the gap of health equity through a number of pillars, which empowers service providers to deliver sound remedies no matter the applicants social, economic, demographic or geographic differences.

2. The CAN is a portal where applicants can simplify their search for a wide variety of support, as needed. One request connects the applicant to multiple non-profits partners who are in a position to help an applicant, based on applicant criteria and need. Applicants can not only request assistance, but are able to securely store, share and electronically sign documents, communicate with providers, manage personal finances, set tasks, and much more, through the HIPPA compliant platform. The membership is always free of charge to applicants.

3. The portal creates opportunities to enrich lives through powerful fin-tech tools, HUD housing programs, employment initiatives and education solutions. Simply put, the CAN is an intersection of philanthropy, impact and measurement.

4. As a universal platform of services, the Coordinated Assistance Network is seeking funding to continue building the bedrock of a changing landscape for people through diversity, inclusion, and equity. By partnering with the CAN, strategic investments multiply to provide a direct impact on non-profits, individuals and families facing difficult times. #TogetherWeCAN

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Religious groups
Sexual identity
Social and economic status
Work status and occupations

Where we work

Awards

CFO Champion of Financial Literacy Award 2011

State of Florida

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of minority led nonprofit organizations empowered through technology.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

CANchange Coordinated Inclusion

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The 2021-22 Coordinated Assistance Network’s “Momentum to Modernize” opportunity will offer a total of 100 grants, each with a five-year “Black Level” license to Minority Led Organizations (MLO’s).

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Coordinated Assistance Network Goals

1. The CAN believes the financial resiliency of individuals and families belongs in every great program. To that end, their financial literacy, inclusion, capability and progress is at the center of every decision made.

2. The CAN is dedicated to making other people’s lives better by closing the gap of health equity through several pillars, which empowers service providers to deliver sound remedies no matter the applicants social, economic, demographic, or geographic variances.

3. As a universal platform of services, the CAN will continue building the bedrock of a changing landscape for people through diversity, inclusion, and equity. The CAN works with nonprofit partners through cohorts to develop best practices in technology and delivery.

4. The CAN seeks to empower Minority led Organizations (MLO’s) through by leveraging the CAN technology to strengthen efficiency, security, and collaboration of those organizations.

5. The CAN is developing and strengthening leadership networks that equip and enable community leaders who are committed to racial equity to advance the health, education and economic well-being of families.

6. The CAN aims to empower smaller organizations with capacity to become difference makers, and larger organizations with better system uses, affording each the ability to scale and deliver worthwhile programs.

The CAN leadership believes people have the inherent capacity to solve their own problems. Compassionate leaders from their communities know the realities facing their neighbors and Minority Led Organizations (MLO’s) are central to those issues. They possess the knowledge and experience that helps them address gaps in education, financial health and the economy; guide how public and private resources are leveraged; and determine how success should be defined and measured. The CAN is interested in developing and strengthening leadership networks that equip and enable MLO leaders who are committed to racial equity to advance the health, education and economic well-being of families and children of the LGBTQ, disabled, people of color and other minority communities.

The CAN portal creates opportunities to enrich lives through powerful self-help financial tools, HUD housing programs, employment initiatives, emergency services and education solutions. Simply put, the CAN is an intersection of philanthropy, impact, and measurement. While economic equity and endurance are forefront of the CAN for applicants, the system is a powerful resource for non-profits and stakeholders to produce evidence-based results. A full suite of technology is available for non-profits to perform nearly every function of a day-to-day operation, ultimately streamlining their services to those who need them the most. Applicants are offered a dashboard to assess and learn, while enabling them to become part of their own solution. When more assistance is required, a request can be connected to local and national programs with one application. The CAN is the portal of connectivity and change, which opens a world of new opportunities for the greater social service community.

Inclusion is a major priority of the CAN, as its partnerships multiply the reach to engage those who require education with effective follow-up to create stability. All functions are performed within the highly secure, HIPAA and ADA compliant, & HUD Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) compliant cloud-based platform.

As a result of the COVID-19 national crisis, the platform formerly known as “The Yellow Ribbon Network” (YRN) partnered with several organizations that have little to do with the military community or nothing at all. Organizations across the U.S. and its territories were forced to close, many of whom will never open their doors again due to the lack of preparation for remote management. On July 15, 2020, the VeteransPlus Executive Leadership Board met with the Board of Directors during a special board meeting to propose a formal name and brand change of the organization to the “Coordinated Assistance Network’ (CAN). The formal change was to address Americas socioeconomic climate and ever evolving challenges. As a non-profit, the organization sought to become more inclusive of its proprietary delivery platform and to grow its financial services offered. The proposal was approved and one month later the CAN was born as the country heals and grows equitable positions for all families. The organization is now formally known as the Coordinated Assistance Network (CAN) with the D.B.A. of VeteransPlus as a program. By offering a remote access workspace to better suit employees working from home, the CAN is answering the call for organizations that may have been marginalized. The CAN transformed its interface and with the new customizations, applicants are now in the right place to receive assistance during the pandemic and beyond. There is still much more to do.

For its commitment to America's Veterans, the organization has received special recognition by:

6 year continuous funding for the Coordinated Assistance Network growth
2016 Most impactful NGO technology solution (Navy)
2013-14 Classy Award Finalist (#2)
2014 Recognized and promoted as a Provider of financial literacy by Texas Dept of Veteran Affairs
2013-14 Americas Top 20 Non-Profits: The Philanthropy Roundtable
2012-13 Best of the Best: DoD recognized Yellow Ribbon programs
2011 Champion of Financial Literacy Award (Florida Governor)
2010 Recognized and promoted as a Provider of financial literacy by California Dept of Veteran Affairs 2012 Recognized and promoted as a Provider of financial literacy by Florida Dept of Veteran Affairs. VeteransPlus became the first non-profit organization to be included in the states annual Veterans Benefits Guide.
2009 Named most trusted resources by Military.com
2009 At the invitation of the Chairman of the Florida Senate Committee for Transportation and Economic Development Appropriations

The network has continuously delivered key insights, metrics and engaging resources to non-profit partners, for-profit services providers, employers, and government entities. Today, the CAN recently passed 500,000 individual users, community service providers, non-profit partner organizations located in every state and several countries. More than 88-90% of all served by the CAN (and the YRN) have been low to moderate income individuals and families.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We do not limit programs and services based the applicants social, economic, demographic, or geographic variances. Everyone.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Technology,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The core operation of the CAN is to strengthen the future of each person served and that will never change. The leadership passionately believes the decision to pivot the technology during the COVID pandemic was the right choice. Families who deal with socioeconomic inequities, can now experience a greater level of inclusion as the delivery of services through the Coordinated Assistance network.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The CAN believes people have the inherent capacity to solve their own problems. Compassionate leaders from their communities know the realities facing their neighbors and MLO’s are central to those issues and have voiced their opinions to drive change of the organization. They possess the knowledge and experience that helps them address gaps in education, financial health, and the economy; guide how public and private resources are leveraged; and determine how success should be defined and measured. The CAN is developing and strengthening leadership networks that equip and enable Minority Led Organizations (MLO's) leaders who are committed to racial equity to advance the health, education and economic well-being of children, families, and communities.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Coordinated Assistance Network, Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Coordinated Assistance Network, Inc

Board of directors
as of 06/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr Steve Rector

Chief Executive Officer at Corizon Health

Term: 2014 - 2020

Steve Rector

Corizon Health

Mary Kay (Hollingsworth) Rutan

VA

William Bodette

Marines (retired)

Jeffrey Leemon

Dept of Navy

John Douglas

MOPH (retired)

John Pickens

VeteransPlus

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/6/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/02/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.