PLATINUM2023

Street Lab

Programs for public space

aka The Uni Project   |   Brooklyn, NY   |  www.streetlab.org

Mission

Street Lab is a nonprofit that creates and shares programs for public space across New York City. We do this work in order to improve the urban environment, strengthen neighborhoods, and bring New Yorkers together. We also send kits around the world so that others can do the same.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Leslie Davol

Director

Sam Davol

Main address

280 Nevins St #2-9

Brooklyn, NY 11217-4845 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-4812025

NTEE code info

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

New York City needs a street-level environment that better supports and inspires residents in all corners of the city. In particular, the city needs public spaces where people can gather, connect, and find things to do together.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Programming NYC Public Space

Street Lab creates public installations that travel across New York City. We offer activities that people of all ages, backgrounds, and abilities can do together. Always free.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

We design, fabricate, and send kits around the world so that other cities activate public space and copy our pop-up model.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

The Uni Project is our special initiative to use pop-up to bring opportunities for learning to the public spaces where at-risk NYC kids gather after school and during summers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Programming NYC Public Space

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of neighborhoods reached

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Programming NYC Public Space

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Children and youth

Related Program

Programming NYC Public Space

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Estimate 50 per pop-up. Mostly kids and families.

Number of program/model/intervention innovations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Programming NYC Public Space

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of pop-up programs (only those that are on-going)

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Programming NYC Public Space

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of community host partners supported with these programs/tools

Number of locations served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Programming NYC Public Space

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of events in low- to moderate-income areas

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Programming NYC Public Space

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Street Lab seeks to realize the full potential of public space in neighborhoods of New York City by creating experiences that allow people of all ages to gather, connect, and find inspiration. We envision a city where all people have access to high-quality amenities and programming, right in their neighborhood.

We provide programming in parks, plazas, and other public spaces across New York City using a pop-up approach, working in support of place-making efforts already underway by local groups. We focus on solutions that communities can't easily implement themselves, and we share these resources across the city. We choose locations based on requests from community groups, and we work in partnership with city agencies, prioritizing underserved areas. Along the way, we enlist the help of architects, fabricators, artists, and educators. We also send kits around the world so that other cities can copy our model.

We have established a network of over 200 community partners working to improve neighborhoods across New York City, and we have identified over 450 public spaces that are in need of programming. Our operation is nimble, and we have already worked in 185 of these locations since 2011. We have award-winning programs at the ready, and new programs in development. We are capable of custom solutions requiring design and fabrication, and we can incorporate other programming partners. We have friendly and experienced staff who are fluent in different languages and skilled at welcoming all kinds of people. Finally, we have funders who support our work across the city.

Street Lab was founded in 2006 in Boston, where we created pop-up programs for neighborhoods, including a festival called Films at the Gate and the Storefront Library. In 2011 we launched the Uni Project, an effort focused on pop-up reading rooms, and moved the organization to NYC under that name. \n\nSince that time we've provided more than 600 days of programming in 150+ public spaces across the city, engaging more than 35,000 New Yorkers. We've established ongoing partnerships with both NYC Department of Transportation and NYC Department of Parks and Recreation and have worked with 120+ different local groups. Annually, we now reach about 45 neighborhoods, providing approximately 150 days of programming, and 86% of that work serves low to moderate income communities. We've also made 36 kits for libraries, museums, and cities that want to copy our model.\n\nThe range of programs we offer has expanded as well, and we now offer pop-up drawing stations, portable museum exhibits, design activities, and soon, small scale music-making and performance. Some of our programming partners include the SoHo Memory Project, the Harlem-based science-education organization HYPOTHEkids, The Drawing Center, the Central Park Zoo, and all three of the city's public libraries. As a result of our growth, we are re-introducing the organization's original name of Street Lab in 2018 to reflect our expanding scope of programs and services.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Street Lab
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Street Lab

Board of directors
as of 02/06/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jane Bock

The Legal Aid Society

Term: 2021 -

Jane Sujen Bock

The Legal Aid Society

Willard Donham

Harvard University

Jared Eigerman

Dalton and Finegold, LLP

Laura Fleder

Manhattan Comprehensive Night and Day High School

Kenneth Gordon

MLB Advanced Media

Judith Hilton

Deutsche Bank Asset Management

Zara Mannan

GSO Capital Partners/Blackstone

Morgan Jones

Avenues School

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/25/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/25/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.