PLATINUM2023

MOVE FOR HUNGER INC

Donate Your Food When You Move

Neptune, NJ   |  https://www.moveforhunger.org

Mission

Move For Hunger is a non-profit organization that has created a sustainable way to reduce food waste and fight hunger. We have mobilized the leaders of moving, relocation, and multi-family industries to provide their customers, clients, and residents with the opportunity to donate their food when they move. Members of the Move For Hunger network also organize community food drives, participate in awareness campaigns, and create employee engagement programs.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Mr. Adam Lowy

Main address

7 3rd Avenue

Neptune, NJ 07753 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-4826262

NTEE code info

(Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs) (K30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

More than 40 million Americans face hunger every day, including 1 in 6 children. Meanwhile, 35% of the food produced in the United States every year is wasted. Food is a fundamental human right. We believe that everyone should have access to enough nutritious food to support a happy healthy life. People who are food insecure are more likely struggle in school and to be in poor health. A nation that allows 13% of its citizens to go hungry cannot achieve its full potential. Hunger is a formidable barrier to a person’s, and, by extension, our country’s prosperity. The United States wastes approximately 35% of the food it produces, which is almost inconceivable when so many people are in need. Our food waste epidemic also has a profound impact on our planet. It has been linked to climate change and contributes to land, air, and water pollution. It is nothing short of an environmental catastrophe.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mover Program

Move For Hunger partners with moving companies across the US and Canada, turning every move into an opportunity to donate food. Movers in our network offer to collect unopened, nonperishable food items from clients who are moving and deliver to local food banks and pantries. Movers also provide transportation and labor to assist with community food drives, large food transports, and food recovery efforts.

The members in the Mover Program are at the front lines of MFH’s work. While in people’s homes on a daily basis, these relocation professionals are perfectly poised to educate their clients on the issues of hunger and food waste. The people moving are given a box by their mover to deposit the food as they pack up their homes, and the mover collects and delivers the food to a local food bank.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Move For Hunger partners with apartment communities, management companies, and corporate housing providers to collect food from people who are moving. Collection of unopened, nonperishable food occurs when a resident moves and is brought to a local food bank by one of our transportation partners. Communities also offer great opportunities to engage residents in food drives and other hunger awareness activities.

Through the Multi-Family Program, MFH is able to provide year-round, onsite engagement with property managers and residents. When residents notify their management company of their move, they are provided with a MFH information/educational sheet and a paper, recyclable, food collection bag to put their food in. Once the apartment complex has enough donations, MFH connects them to a local transportation partner, who then retrieves the food and delivers it to a local food bank in the community. Participating apartment communities & management are also encouraged, and provided the resources and support, to organize food drives & fundraisers as well as resident engagement events throughout the year.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

With the support of our moving partners over the last 10 years, Move For Hunger has designed fun, creative, turn-key food drives that can be replicated by anyone across the nation. The goal is to make these events simple to organize as well as meaningful experiences for all those involved. Beyond just putting a can of food in a box, Move for Hunger’s fun food drive campaigns are educational, inspiring, and community-building. To date, Move For Hunger has organized more than 3,700 food drives, with over 500 occurring thus far in 2019 alone; we expect that number to be over 1000 by year end. In fact, when searching, “How To Host A Food Drive,” or “How To Start A Food Drive,” Move For Hunger appears as one of the top search results in Google. When people visit the Move For Hunger website, they can find a number of engaging food drive campaigns to choose from. Move For Hunger provides fliers, best practices, social media images, and transportation logistics to collect and deliver the food to local food banks, all free of charge to the organizer. Some notable campaigns include: Spread The Love (a PB&J food drive that includes peanut butter & jelly-two commonly requested food bank items), Can The CEO (built for corporate environments), and Shark Week (a tunafish drive built around Discovery’s Shark Week).

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

MFH’s Employee Mobility Program leverages consumer demand for corporate sustainability by partnering with companies to include MFH in their relocation policies and to implement MFH’s employee engagement plans. As part of these efforts, MFH has established a Corporate Action Network composed of strategic members within the corporate relocation space (representing companies like Hewlett Packard, Nike, Apple, Google, Chase, and Facebook) who are committed to amending relocation policies and acting as advisors and ambassadors for MFH’s mission.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our network collects food donations from people who are moving, community food drives, and large food rescues. All food is delivered to food banks or pantries, local to where it was collected.

Number of food donation partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Move For Hunger’s partners include our network of relocation partners that collect and deliver food, as well as multi-family community partners who collect food from their residents year-round.

Number of community food drives hosted and/or organized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Move For Hunger creates turnkey event materials to help individuals and companies organize food drives. We support event organizers and coordinate food pick up and deliver to food banks/pantries.

Number of food deliveries to local food bank

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Move For Hunger tracks each individual delivery made to a local food bank or pantry from food drives, events, and collections from people who are moving.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Every 1.2 pounds of rescued food is enough to provide 1 individual meal. Move For Hunger's network collects food donations from people who are moving, community food drives, and large food rescues.

Pounds of perishable food donated to food banks and pantries in US and Canada

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2021, Move For Hunger expanded its scope to launch a new initiative into fresh and perishable food.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Move For Hunger offers a sustainable solution to the inexcusable paradox of waste among want, while providing an entire industry with a purpose.

By providing people with the opportunity to donate their food when they move, we believe we can eliminate food waste during the relocation process. Why is that important? Because 35 million Americans move every single year. If we recovered just 1 pound of food from each of them, we’d be able to provide 29 million meals to families struggling with food insecurity.

Move For Hunger is dedicated to fostering community partnerships that will continue to grow organically for years to come. We are committed to changing the way entire industries do business. We will challenge millions of people to confront the issues of hunger and food waste and provide them with opportunities to take action. Together, day-by-day, we will create a more just and sustainable future.

Move For Hunger’s network has delivered more than 26 million pounds of food, enough food to provide more than 21 million meals to individuals and families in need. Move For Hunger leverages the existing transportation resources of entire industries to collect and deliver food to food banks. Through its programs, food banks receive regular, year-round food deliveries without expending any additional overhead costs, while increasing food access to those in need. Move For Hunger also educates millions of people on the issues of hunger and food waste by helping to organize thousands of food drives, fundraisers, employee engagement events, and awareness campaigns. Finally, Move For Hunger gives individuals who are moving an easy opportunity to contribute to a powerful movement.

Established in 2009, Move For Hunger is the first and only non-profit that has mobilized the leaders of the moving, relocation, and multi-family industries to provide their customers, clients, and residents with the opportunity to donate their food when they move. By collecting unopened, non-perishable food from people who are moving and delivering it to local food banks, Move For Hunger has replicated this model across North America by developing formalized and innovative food-rescue programs. Over the last decade, nearly 1,100 moving companies and 2,300+ multi family apartment communities, as well as many of the world’s leading relocation companies have joined the Move For Hunger network to rescue food during the moving process throughout the United States & Canada and deliver that food to the local food banks and pantries in the communities they serve.

Move For Hunger's dedicated team consisting of employees, interns, and volunteers work throughout the year to coordinate all programming and partnerships. As the only nonprofit to work directly within the moving and relocation industry, Move For Hunger is uniquely positioned to connect the dots of transportation, excess product, and food banks & pantries who are able to provide food for those in need.

Over the last 13 years, the Move For Hunger Network has rescued and delivered over 26 million pounds of non perishables to food banks across the US and Canada by engaging the moving and relocation industry to make giving back part of the moving process. In 2021, Move For Hunger had an increase of 365% year over year growth in our Multi-Family Program. We were also able to increase the amount of fresh food transported to food banks and pantries; over 700,000 pounds of fresh food was delivered. And finally, as a result of our work, we were able to remove 688 tons of CO2 from the environment.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

MOVE FOR HUNGER INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

MOVE FOR HUNGER INC

Board of directors
as of 11/08/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rick Schwartz

Schwartz Consulting Group, LLC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/08/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.