School the World, Inc.

Making A World of Difference

aka School the World   |   Boston, MA   |  https://schooltheworld.org/

Mission

Our mission is to alleviate extreme poverty through the power of education. Together with local governments, our partners and deeply engaged parents, we provide young children living in the poorest communities the opportunity to learn so that they can work towards a brighter future.

Ruling year info

2009

Founder/CEO

Kate Curran

Main address

24 School Street 2nd Floor

Boston, MA 02108 USA

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Formerly known as

The Giving Project, Inc.

EIN

27-0176563

NTEE code info

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

School the World aims to address the Learning Crisis. "The Learning Crisis is a moral and economic crisis" -World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim. Marked by 38% of children not learning basic literacy and numeracy, the Learning Crisis is a global problem. 263 million children of school age are out of school. 130 million children complete four years of school without learning basics. 400 million children complete four years of school and learn the basics. 120 million children do not complete four years of school (Source: EFA Global Monitoring Report 2013-2014). Combating the Learning Crisis points towards eliminating extreme poverty and creating shared opportunity and prosperity for all.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Build Schools

Our program reaches deep into the isolated communities of Guatemala and Honduras. Often, we are providing the first schools these villages have ever seen; or worse, existing schools are in desperate need of repair to ensure safety of the children and teachers.

In Honduras, due to prevalence of violence and political unrest, we are often the only organization actively engaged to ensure children and families in Honduras have access to quality education. (Please note that our Student Service Trips are limited to Guatemala.)

The schools we build are a first step, and often the most important. We collaborate with the local community so they provide the labor and some of the materials needed for the build. Additionally, we require matching funds from local governments and partners so that they remain deeply committed to our process. Finally, we raise funds from corporate sponsors and generous individuals to supplement materials like books and school supplies necessary to learning.

Together, we change lives. Our program gives the people living in rural villages of Central America a chance to live beyond the drudgery of poverty and life rooted in illiteracy.



Play is an important part of the learning experience. Most of the children enrolled in our schools go to work before and after school to help support their families. It is not uncommon to find children as young as 5 years old shining shoes, selling goods in the market or tending to their family farm.This leaves them with very little time for play.

While developing literacy skills is a cornerstone to our education, we believe giving our students a safe place to discover, imagine and explore is equally important. On the playground the children can develop social and cognitive skills, mature emotionally, and gain the self confidence required to engage in new experiences and environments.

Furthermore, the playground serves as a safe place for girls (and boys) to play free from prescribed gender roles. In a society that is culturally rooted in specific gender roles, hierarchy, and expectations, girls are able to break away and experience play on equal grounds.

Teamwork, leadership, and communication; these are skills children mold and develop in school. However, these skills derive from playtime just as much, or even more than, in the classroom. Play isn't an alternative, but an aid to learning.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

At School the World, we help support the teachers by building schools so they have a safe place to teach. We also deeply engage parents and local community so they can provide a quality learning experience to the children. Finally, we provide books & supplies and train teachers so they can provide quality learning experience to the children.

We deliver extensive monthly training to our teachers over two years using a tested and proven methodology developed by US AID (Centers for Excellence in Teacher Training or “CETT”). Our expert trainers work with teachers in groups once a month and visit each teacher for in-classroom training every month.

The training strives toward child-centric teaching with a special focus on methods for teaching literacy using supplemental reading materials. While CETT develops teaching skills, we build a culture of professional pride, peer influence and motivation with teaching prizes and best practices sharing.

The teachers in our schools are all local teams. They are personally invested in their nation’s educational progress and familiar with the challenges children and families face day in and day out. Our teachers also speak the native language, know the customs, and understand what it takes to keep our students motivated .

We challenge parents to begin investing in books by promising that School the World will multiply what they give by 5 in the first year, by 4 in the second year, by 3 in the third year, by 2 in the fourth year and by 1 in the fifth year. After 5 years, we have a full mini-library in every classroom!

These parents often support their entire families on less than $2 a day, but they are rising to the challenge. They organize around the incentive and pledge between $1.25 and $2.50 per child for books, sometimes in 2 installments.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

We all know education begins in the home. And the more involved parents are, both in and out of school, the more a child is likely to learn. The majority of our parents cannot read or write, but they desperately want an education for their children. These parents have a tremendous influence over what happens in their local school, and we help them understand how best to use that influence.

With our parental engagement program, we organize parent meetings every two weeks. We engage them in discussion and strive for outcomes like a “code of care” for school property and peer-to-peer outreach to the parents of children who are not in school. And we educate them about some of the most important indicators of learning, such as instructional time.

One very important part of the equation for success is our ability to partner with local governments. Actually, we make it a requirement.

Every village we invest in, the local government donates the land, raw materials and/or labor to help with the school build. We supplement their resources with our expertise, resources and experience.

Partnering with the local community guarantees that everybody has a vested interest in the success of the school. Equally important, it creates a lasting culture that values education and progress.

Population(s) Served
Parents

We call them World Changers because of their passion for service and desire to drive change.

Students spend time before their spring or summer break fundraising for a nine-day service trip in the Western Highlands of Guatemala. Funds they raise go directly towards buying materials and supplies to build a school or playground in a Guatemalan village. Students visit the community to participate in the actual construction process and complete in time to join the dedication ceremony.

Each group that travels completes 1 new school building during their journey of discovery. We also believe cultural exposure and understanding is an important part of our program. During their trip, students experience the wonders of the Mayan world, visit the Spanish colonial city of Antigua, climb the active Pecaya volcano, explore a local coffee farm and barter in the largest open air market in Central America.

During their trip, our student travelers begin to open their eyes and minds to the deep, complicated causes underlying poverty and gender discrimination prevalent in the rural villages. They also walk away with first hand insights to economic realities that force mothers and fathers to send their young children across our treacherous borders. More importantly, they experience the power and influence of education in ordinary people’s lives.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

We take success very seriously. That is why we measure student achievement in the most reliable way possible, through testing at our schools and at similarly situated control schools. We test at the beginning of the teacher training program, again at the end of the first year, and again at the end of the second year of teacher training. After just one year, our schools are outperforming the control schools in both reading and math.

But we use test results for a lot more than that. We analyze the results to look for patterns – patterns that often tells us about how kids, teachers and schools are performing and sometimes even why. We take these learnings and optimize our program so we are continuously improving and creating positive change.

6,464 students enrolled!

We recognize there is a gap between girls and boys when it comes to access and expectations.

Giving girls access to education is the first of many steps essential to reducing gender discrimination and breaking down gender barriers. It is not uncommon to see families send only their sons to school, leaving the girls to domestic duties and childrearing. As a result, girls are more susceptible to be left behind in poverty and continue to be dependent on their families for support. Providing access to education allows girls to have the skills they need to negotiate key life decisions and to have the license to seek lifestyles and choices that are not bound by prescribed gender roles.

We have high expectations for our girls and expect the same from our students and their families. Our program reinforces girls' commitment to their own education, works with girls to develop essential life skills and increases support for girls’ education among their parents, school staff, and communities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of teachers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Quality Learning

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Virtual Teacher Training Program during COVID-19 school closures.

Number of parents/guardians engaged in student activities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Local Support

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Quality Learning

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of schools built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Build Schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to provide access for quality education to those living in the rural villages of Central America. Together with local governments, our partners and deeply engaged parents, we provide young children living in the poorest communities the opportunity to learn so that they can work towards a brighter future.

Founded in 2009, School the World broke ground at its first school in Guatemala. Since then, we have built 53 primary schools, trained 255 teachers and enrolled 6,464 students in Honduras and Guatemala.

We are one of the first NGOs to mandate community partnership. We require municipality to contribute 50% of the costs and the community must contribute land and unskilled labor. We also require the parents to participate in parent education programs; even our supply chain of books and supplies depend on partial parental contribution.

School the World transforms lives by working to make quality education accessible to all children and families living in rural villages of Central America.

We believe education is a vital component to alleviating poverty, increasing gender equality and promoting economic sustainability.

Our work is built on the belief that lasting change can only happen by:

creating a safe place for children to learn and thrive
securing physical and financial commitment from local government
deeply engaging parents through mandatory parent education classes
providing on-going training for teachers
supplying much needed books and learning materials
constantly measuring for improvement and success
nurturing global leaders through our Student Service Learning Program

School the World hires seasoned non-profit leaders from within the countries that we work to lead our extensive programs (listed on this page). We hire local staff to train the parents within the local community on the education we will be providing their children and how the experience will benefit them. We hire local Universities and/or experienced trainers to lead our teacher training programs to ensure our schools provide a quality and fair education. Finally we hire local architects and engineers to manage the construction of our schools and playgrounds in Guatemala and Honduras aligning with our mission to support and improve the local community.

School the world, thus far, has built 75 schools, enrolled 8,195 students, trained 323 teachers, built 31 playgrounds, built 349 classroom libraries, and trained 4,908 parents. From our first cohorts, the data shows an increase in first grade passing rates, a dramatic reduction in drop out rates, and an increase in completion rates of school. Our surveys demonstrate improved morale among stakeholders, parent understanding of and compliance with the school schedule, and teacher sense of accountability. Going forward School the World in on track to build 100 schools serving 10,000 children by 2020, through an increase in charitable giving. We are also conducting research currently to incorporate another country into our program. We plan to be established in our third country by the end of 2019.

Financials

School the World, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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School the World, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 2/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cindy Clemson

Eaton Vance

Merrily Bodell

IvyWise LLC

Keith Clausen

Envisage International Corporation

Joseph Cronin

International Travel Insurance Group

Kate Curran

School the World

Cynthia del Aguila

Foundation of the Universidad de Valle de Guatemala

Linda Delaney

Delaney McKinney LLC

Claudia Pinto

Investor, Former EU & Portuguese Foreign Service

Andy Sears

Investor

Ellen McDonnell Stevens

Ellen McDonnell Consulting LLC

Nicole Sahin

Globalization Partners

Vicki Costa

Talbots

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/11/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/19/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.