ACTION PROGRAMS FOR ANIMALS

Helping people ... saving pets

Las Cruces, NM   |  www.apalascruces.org

Mission

Our mission is to help Dona Ana County reach our No Kill goal to eliminate the unnecessary killing of companion animals via progressive & friendly animal-welfare programs and services. Our vision is that our efforts will help transform our community to improve the quality of life for companion animals and greatly reduce the number of abandoned and homeless animals impounded and killed at our municipal shelter.

Notes from the nonprofit

APA opened a thrift store in late 2019 to help raise funds for primarily our overhead costs. Running an adoption center and caring for up to 75 animals under one roof requires more help than volunteers alone can provide. We strive to keep our costs down, and we only employ who is necessary to operate our programs and services and ensure 24/7 humane care, even for sick animals. Our adoption center is lead by our DOO and supported by part-time animal caregiving staff. Our Second Chance Thrift Store is led by our store manager and supported by part-time cashiers and drivers.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Ms. Michel Meunier

Director of Operations

Ms. Nora Insurriaga

Main address

537 N. Solano Ave.

Las Cruces, NM 88001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-0234541

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Dona Ana County is still at the top of the nation per capita when it comes to intake of unwanted, homeless, abused animals in the United States. We started our organization to help fill in areas of need and gaps in programs and services to turn our shelter and our community around. When we started in 2009, our shelter was putting down more than 80% of the animals entering the system. Today, in 2020, we are all working hard together and have reversed those numbers. Now our shelter and community save rate is more than 80%. The issue is the problem is never-ending. As soon as we save a live and open a spot, there are many animals needing that spot. Though we have increased the lifesaving rate, the intake rate has not dropped by much. We need everyone's help in our community to start making a difference on that end, the animals the shelter ends up taking in yearly. APA pulls cats and dogs continuously from the shelter and we have since 2012.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Pet Food Bank

The APA Pet Food Bank administers pet food and other supplies to low- and no-income pet guardians to help people keep their pets in times of economic stress or need.  We service about 50 families per week and distribute 10,000+ pounds of pet food per month.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

We launched this program in May 2012. Via quarantine and regular foster homes, we pull at-risk animals from our municipal shelter and offer them for adoption. We have saved more than 980 animals (from May 2012 thru May 2014). In May 2014, we also opened our first adoption and education center, which will help us increase our lifesaving rate by 50% this year.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In partnership with the Southern New Mexico Correctional Facility, we rescue more than 100 dogs per year by having them obedience trained and readied for adoption. This program also helps the inmate handlers and gives them a purpose while serving time. It helps both people and animals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

APA has run low-cost microchip and vaccination clinics in DAC since 2012. We have run more than 50 clinics and vaccinated/chipped thousands of DAC animals. We used to do them all over DAC, but now we do them monthly at our adoption center.

Population(s) Served

APA has run three dog training classes a year for the public to learn how to train their dogs like our PAWS dogs are trained in our prison program. We stared this program when we started getting requests from the public to send their dogs to our prison program. That program is only to help us rehab our rescue dogs, so this was how we decided to help the public learn to train their dogs the way our handlers do.

Population(s) Served
Health
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status
Health
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Las Cruces Bulletin's Best Cause 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health, Religious groups

Related Program

Animal Rescue and Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We rescue animals primarily from the municipal animal shelter but also work in some from the community in need, such as homeless kittens and small dogs.

Average adoption fee (in dollars) per dog adopted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status, Health

Related Program

Animal Rescue and Adoption

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our standard adoption fee for all animals is $50 and $25 for seniors. For popular small breeds, we now have a fee of $100 or $50 for seniors.

Total pounds of pet food and litter distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Social and economic status, Family relationships, Ethnic and racial groups, Health

Related Program

Pet Food Bank

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We have run the Pet Food Bank program in DAC since we were founded in 2009. It's our pilot program.

Number of pets microchipped

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

Low-Cost Microchip & Vaccination Clinics

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We microchip all our own rescue animals as well as animals from people from the public in the low-cost microchip and vaccination clinics we have been running since 2012.

Number of animals rehabilitated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Work status and occupations, Social and economic status, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships

Related Program

P.A.W.S. (Prisoners and Animals Working Toward Success)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We have rehabilitated and placed shelter dogs since 2016 via our prison dog training program. This program helps us save many more at-risk lives and enriches the lives of our inmate dog handlers.

Total dollars of operating costs per animal per day

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

Animal Rescue and Adoption

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Ever since we moved into a building, there are dogs and cats/kittens to care for 24/7. We need staff and supplies and medications to do so. The average cost per day per animal to do so is $50.

Number of veterinary field clinics held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status, Family relationships, Health

Related Program

Low-Cost Microchip & Vaccination Clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We used to run clinics in the field before we had a building. Now, we run monthly clinics for all DAC residents once a month. This was on hold 2020 because of the pandemic but will restart when able.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to lead our community to become the first in New Mexico to reach a No Kill status, which means that we are saving more than 90% of the cats and dogs which end up at our municipal shelter. We set yearly goals of direclty impacting the shelter's kill rate by increasing our rescue numbers and/or targeting the most at-risk populations (such as big dogs, shy/timid animals, and cats/kittens). We rescue our animals primarily from the municipal shelter. We also participate in other collaborative activities with organizations also working in areas of the No Kill Equation, which is the plan a community needs to comprehensively incorporate in order to reach the No Kill goal.

Our strategy is to fill in gaps in the necessary No Kill programs and services in our community. We work primarily in the area of pulling animals from the shelter which are at risk of being put down for whatever reason and also any animals they give to us to help make room for incoming animals. We often take the animals not accepted by breed-specific rescues and ones which represent the highest pet populations in our community, such as pit bull mixes, chihuhua mixes, and kittens which do not stand a good chance of survival in the sheltering environment. We are able to do this work via a growing foster network and steady, high adoption numbers We are essentially giving the shelter animals the second chance they need to find a forever home the next time around.

We grow our capabilities each year by growing the network of people in our community who stand behind the No Kill goal and are learning that we cannot reach the goal with a few supporters. For example, when we started in 2009, we had five board members and a handful of volunteers. Today ,we have a larger, more diverse board and more than 100 volunteers/foster homes who help us save more lives. It will take hundreds of people to lend a hand in any area they can. We also are growing our presence in the community by opening our first adoption and education facility at 800 W. Picacho in Las Cruces, NM, in May 2014. This location also houses our pet food bank program, which strives to keep people from feeling they have to give up their dogs to the shelter in times of economic strife/need.

Though our organization was founded in 2009, we primarily ran the pet food bank for the first couple of years. When we started getting more support for our No Kill philosophies and approaches, we were able to, in May 2012, start our direct rescue work via our Dona Ana Pets Alive! campaign. Since that time, we have rescued more than 4000 animals from our municipal shelter. Now that we have a facility which the public can visit almost daily, and we are out on the weekends at offsite locations doing adoptions, we will be able to progress to save thousands of animals a year, which will help our community reach the overall No Kill goal--our shared mission!

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve the public in many capacity, as follows: --Volunteers and Fosters --Adopters of our rescue animals --Food Bank clients --Vaccination/microchip Clinic clients --PAWS Dog Training Class clients We collect feedback in person, online from our website, or via our social media pages.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email, Web and social media,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently changed our process for adoption out very popular small dogs. We had to sit down and figure out the most equitable/fair way to choose adopters for these dogs that best serves the animal as well as the adopting family. Now we do a week or two of meets and greets with all interested parties, take notes, and at the end of the period we rank the adopters from 1-X, and we then adopt the dog out. This also gives us back-up adopters should the first family chosen not choose to keep the dog.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It helps us constantly improve and make better, fair decisions.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

ACTION PROGRAMS FOR ANIMALS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ACTION PROGRAMS FOR ANIMALS

Board of directors
as of 3/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Amanda Lopez Askin

Sharon Hartford

ACTion Programs for Animals

Denise Cooper

Mardell Esparza

ACTion Programs for Animals

Karen Mabry

ACTion Programs for Animals

Lauren Zimmerman

ACTion Programs for Animals

Lindsay Buckman

ACTion Programs for Animals

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/26/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.