PLATINUM2023

Mitchell Swaback Charities, Inc. DBA Harvest Compassion Center

#Feed1Love1

aka Harvest Compassion Centers   |   Phoenix, AZ   |  www.harvestcompassioncenter.org

Mission

Our mission is to provide food and clothing in a hope-filled environment to the underserved in the greater Phoenix area.

Ruling year info

2010

CEO/Executive Director

Mrs. Nicolee Thompson

Main address

4744 E. Thunderbird Road Ste. 9

Phoenix, AZ 85032 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-0250769

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since Mitchell Swaback Charities opened the first Harvest Compassion Center (HCC) in 2011, we immediately began impacting the lives of single moms, veterans, seniors, the working poor, and the homeless. With 1 in 4 children and 1 in 5 adults going hungry in Arizona, our mission at our now, two Harvest Compassion Centers is to provide food and clothing in a hope-filled environment to the under served in the greater Phoenix area. In 2018, over 7,000 families and 6,100 children (36,180 individuals) were served in the two most underserved zip codes in Maricopa County. The original Phoenix location (85032) assists a population that is mostly Hispanic (51.2%) with a 4.75% unemployment rate. Our newest Maryvale (85033) location services an area with high violent and property crime rates. Unfortunately, in Maryvale, almost half of the population lives below the poverty line and only 55% of children graduate from high school. HCC is their lifeline. Our services are 100% FREE.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Harvest Compassion Centers

Mitchell Swaback Charities, Inc. (MSC) continues to work tirelessly to improve the quality of life for children, women and minorities in the state of Arizona. This is why in 2011 MSC opened the first Harvest Compassion Center (HCC) to immediately serve the needs of children, single moms and those living in poverty. We continue to feed, clothe and improve the quality of life for women, children, and families in the Valley. HCC provides services free of charge, is open to anyone living in Arizona and is 100% funded by grants, corporate partners, and individuals. No government money and/or food product is requested or received. HCC outreach centers are located in North Phoenix, West Phoenix and the Maryvale community.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Family relationships
Social and economic status
Health

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits 2018

Arizona Food Bank Network 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of bibles requested and distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status

Related Program

Harvest Compassion Centers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

HCCs offer free Bibles to all clients, currently in English, Spanish, Burmese, Farsi, Persian, Russian, Polish, and Swahili.

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Parents, Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth, Adults

Related Program

Harvest Compassion Centers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provide free food, clothing, hygiene and baby items to any community member. 2018-2019 reflect families served at HCC North/Maryvale 2020-2021 are numbers reflecting HCC North/Maryvale/West

Pounds of Food Distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Parents, Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Harvest Compassion Centers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Full grocery shopping trips are offered for every HCC client.

Pieces of Clothing Distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Harvest Compassion Centers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All HCC clients shop freely for clothing in our Boutiques.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Harvest Compassion Centers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

HCC's centers are run by volunteers!

Diapers Distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Caregivers, Families, Parents

Related Program

Harvest Compassion Centers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

HCCs offer free diapers and wipes to all clients who have a baby/toddler.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

With the state of the economy in flux and COVID-19 recovery in full swing our concerns for our clients grow more stressful each day that our community's basic needs aren't being met. At Harvest Compassion Centers, we impact the lives of single parents, out of work veterans, seniors living on fixed incomes, immigrants, and generational working families existing at the poverty line, and many homeless men and women - all, who are food insecure. Half of HCCs clients are children, we aim to create great movement within the top underserved communities in our state making sure kids have at least three meals a day.
Our number one goal is to treat every client with the love, dignity and respect. We aim to show the same love of Jesus, to everyone to is humbled enough to ask us for help. We aim to make friends every day we are open, creating relationships that will last a lifetime enabling real change to take place.

HCC is 100% funded through contributions from grants, private foundations, corporations, and individuals… we do not request nor receive local, state or federal funding. Moreover, our ongoing fundraising activities like the FEED 1 Program ($28/month fills one large recyclable grocery bag with food and hygiene items to FEED 1 Family/month), the Walk/Run 5K, and Striking Out Hunger bowling event plus the many activities put on by our youth through the Serving S.P.R.O.U.T.S (Small People Reaching Out Unselfishly To Serve) program, all raise monies to restock food, diapers and hygiene products for both locations.

Thanks to our continued relationships with our community partners, HCC stretches every dollar so we can buy more. From diapers purchased thru the Diaper Bank of Central Arizona, to shelf-stable foods bought in bulk from our largest food partner, St. Mary’s Food Bank, these partnerships and others make it possible to extend each dollar collected to help boost more family shortages.

With an HCC army of over 2,000 volunteers annually serving their community and a small staff of dedicated employees, HCC continues to make major impact in the greater Phoenix area. HCC's board of directors as well as, their advisory board are very involved in developing successful fundraising campaigns, events and outreach programs.

2022 Impact Numbers: HCC North Phoenix, HCC Maryvale, and HCC West Phoenix Locations:
13,411 Families Served - Approximately 45,597 Individuals (FREE food, clothing, hygiene and baby items)
341,462 Pounds of Food Distributed
79,840 Pieces of Clothing Distributed
93,375 Diapers Distributed
4,469 Bibles and Children's Bedtime Books Distributed
13,761 Volunteer Hours Served

2021 Impact Numbers: HCC North Phoenix, HCC Maryvale and HCC West Phoenix Locations:
13,076 Families Served - Approximately 45,510 Individuals (FREE food, clothing, hygiene and baby items)
377,895 Pounds of Food Distributed
57,411 Pieces of Clothing Distributed
86,000 Diapers Distributed
4,469 Bibles and Children's Bedtime Books Distributed
12,005 Volunteer Hours Served

2020 Impact Numbers: HCC North Phoenix, HCC Maryvale and HCC West Phoenix Locations:
8,776 Families Served - Approximately 29,000 Individuals (FREE food, clothing, hygiene and baby items)
286,956 Pounds of Food Distributed
43,431 Pieces of Clothing Distributed
29,572 Diapers Distributed
3,015 Bibles and Children's Bedtime Books Distributed
8,836 Volunteer Hours Served

2019 Impact Numbers: HCC North Phoenix and HCC Maryvale Locations:
9,235 Families Served - Approximately 30,000 Individuals
294,721 Pounds of Food Distributed
47,874 Pieces of Clothing Distributed
29,617 Diapers Distributed
2,215 Bibles and Children's Bedtime Books Distributed
8,610 Volunteer Hours Served

2018 Impact Numbers: HCC North Phoenix and HCC Maryvale Locations:
7,235 Families Served - Approximately 28,050 individuals
149,850 Pounds of Food Distributed
32,660 Pieces of Clothing Distributed
1,579 Bibles and Children's Bedtime Books Distributed
6,102 Volunteer Hours Served

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    HCCs serve individuals living in the top undeserved zip codes. North Phoenix (85032) 30% of households are working poor, living on wages that barely cover housing, earning $30,000/year. Only 51% of the population has a high school degree and 29.2% are not in the labor force. Maryvale community, second top underserved zip (85033), residents live below the poverty line, making $24,000/year, experience crime rates that are almost triple compared to state averages, unemployment rates 26% higher and have the highest number of children on free/reduced meals (almost 100%). West Phoenix (85017), is a generationally poor community where median income is less than $25,000/year, over 39% report no earnings at all, only 49% have a high school diploma and over 95% of kids receive free/reduced meals.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email, Complaint logs,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Recently HCC had a client who felt she was misunderstood when it came to the number of clothing items her family was welcome to shop for. This client felt a volunteer was rude to her and felt that her voice was not heard during her shopping trip. This client called and complained about her experience. Immediately HCC director called her E.D. to discuss the client situation. HCC's E.D. spent an hour on the phone with this client, followed by an in-person meeting with the volunteer and center director to calmly discuss all sides, feelings and facts of the situation. The in-person meeting was a success. All sides felt their voices were heard, the client felt all of her concerns were noted and action was taken. This client feels very comfortable shopping with HCC again next month.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback allows HCC to strengthen client and partner relationships on an ongoing basis. HCC invites over 2,000 volunteers in annually to serve during client shopping hours. Welcoming client as well as, volunteer feedback, allows HCC to sharpen our customer service skills and truly meet the needs of each client we serve. HCC is always looking to enhance and add value to the overall client experience.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Mitchell Swaback Charities, Inc. DBA Harvest Compassion Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Mitchell Swaback Charities, Inc. DBA Harvest Compassion Center

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Bob Swaback

Just Rite Acoustics, Inc.

Term: 2021 - 2024

Brad Sawback

Just Rite Acoustics, Inc.

Gaye Swaback

Mitchell Swaback Charities, Inc.

Kim Fleming

BASICS Schools

Yadira Davis

Crisis Preparation and Recovery

Walt Rhode

Arizona Limousines

David Mitroff

Retired Real Estate Developer

Jim Friedkin

Grand Plaza Penthouse Inc.

Dr. Shawna Martino

Grand Canyon University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/9/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/20/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.