SILVER2022

Children of Conservation Inc

Protecting African Wildlife by Strengthening Communities

aka CHILDREN OF CONSERVATION   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.childrenofconservation.org

Mission

Many iconic African animals will become extinct within our lifetimes. The primary threats are hunting, habitat loss and disease. Chimpanzees and gorillas are hunted as a source of meat. In addition, entire families are killed to satisfy an ever-growing foreign pet trade. Elephants and rhinos are killed for their tusks and horns. Deforestation by foreign investors results in habitat loss for all these animals. Children of Conservation is dedicated to the conservation and protection of endangered species through education, habitat preservation and wildlife sanctuary and conservation worker support.

Ruling year info

2011

Board chair and co-founder

Michele Stumpe

Board Member

Lorna Campbell

Main address

PO Box 412470

Los Angeles, CA 90041 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-0454243

NTEE code info

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Economic Development (S30)

International Educational Development (Q34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We aim to address human impact on endangered and vulnerable wildlife in Africa. We also aim to elevate the status of conservation jobs in African communities through community support and capacity building, to demonstrate the importance of wildlife conservation. We aim to provided education where there is none available and assist communities in becoming sustainable, environmentally aware, and promoting equality.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Scholarships

Our scholarship program has been running since 2009. In that time, we've made it possible for more than 900 children across five African countries to go to school.

The children we support are the kids of wildlife conservation workers. Their parents make a very modest salary and because they live in countries where education is not free, they often can't afford the school fees, uniforms, books and sometimes even boarding costs.

This means that children are growing up without opportunities.

Our scholarship program allows them to attend the best school in their area and there are eleven criteria that help us calculate the amount they receive. Kids can earn bonuses for consistently great grades and taking part in extra-curricular conservation activities.

We work directly with the sanctuaries or local authorities to distribute the funds directly to the schools.

We currently support the children of workers at Sweetwaters Chimpanzee Sanctuary (Kenya), Limbe Wildlife Center (Cameroon), Ape Action Africa (Cameroon), Chimp Eden (South Africa) and Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary (Uganda).

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adolescents

KENYA
For the past four years, Children of Conservation has partnered with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust to spearhead an anti-poaching initiative in villages surrounding the Tsavo National Parks.

In an effort to mitigate human impact on animals and to encourage communities to voluntarily cease the poaching of elephants for ivory, bushmeat or trade, we have been entering into agreements with village leaders. The purpose of this program is to create a buffer-zone around the national park , where the animals are not officially protected, by engaging local communities to participate in conservation.

The communities in and around this large park are primarily supported by pastoralism and other agriculture with few opportunities for new livelihood options. Hunting of elephants for profit is an ongoing and growing threat. It has been found that money from poaching was often used to pay school fees, pay for uniforms, transport and books for their brightest children to attend secondary school.

Children of Conservation is working with on-the-ground-partner, David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, in communities around Tsavo National Park with a history of elephant hunting but who now agree to cease elephant poaching activities in exchange for scholarships, administered carefully by CofC, for their top two students. Children of Conservation’s Anti-Poaching Initiative is designed to eliminate poaching and hunting for bush meat in and around the park. Our scholarships are the consideration given in exchange for a binding agreement with a village chief to ban poaching and promote wildlife conservation.

UGANDA
We are partnering with Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) to create a buffer-zone around Kidepo National Park, outside the area where the animals are officially protected, by engaging local communities to participate in conservation.

The volunteer Community Wildlife Scouts of the Kidepo Valley wildlife corridor have been recruited from communities surrounding the park border by Uganda Wildlife Authority community liaison staff and the Community Conservation Warden. In an effort to mitigate the human impact on the environment and for communities to continue to benefit from eco-tourism of visitors brought to the area by the national park, teams of scouts have been established. They are currently effectively managing human-wildlife conflict and anti-poaching in the large wildlife dispersal area of more than 580 square miles. However, the scouts, who are not armed, are facing threats from high level poachers who have much better technology and resources than they do.

The Uganda Wildlife Authority supports these scouts and trains them to arrest and detain poachers, collect evidence and then appear in court during proceedings to prosecute ivory traffickers. The scout patrols often spend multiple days away from home while patrolling a vast area of northern Uganda, rich with roaming elephants.

We aim to provide these teams with basic supplies to aid their work and technology to allow them to continue their great work to stop ivory hunters and to improve their ability to report, track and identify poachers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

We are taking on a new incredibly impactful pilot project; transforming a poverty-stricken fishing village in Uganda with no access to formal education or healthcare, no running water or electricity, poor sanitation, limited clean water and no opportunity for skills development into a model conservation community that can be replicated across the continent.

This project is the collective vision of the community’s 22 leaders, the local and national governments, the Uganda Wildlife Authority and our partner sanctuary – Chimpanzee Sanctuary and Wildlife Conservation Trust. Together, we are developing a holistic approach to conservation through community empowerment, a focus on the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals, alignment with Uganda’s Vision 2040 for Prosperity and a commitment to utilizing methodologies designed to reverse global warming and minimize climate change. This community will serve as a roadmap for Uganda in similar impoverished areas, as a pilot for similar projects throughout Africa, and as a showcase for the world to see opportunities for synergy between people, planet and prosperity.

The community chosen is the Myende fishing village off the coast of Entebbe in Uganda’s Lake Victoria, just minutes away from the Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary and home to a biodiverse population of birds, many of which are unique to this area. Like most rural but environmentally important villages, Lake Victoria’s fishing villages are the most under-served communities in the country due to their remoteness and comparatively low population densities. Myende has a direct impact on the neighboring Chimpanzee Sanctuary, and is comparatively accessible. It is also located in an extremely biodiverse country that struggles to balance the immediate benefits of environmentally degrading investments in oil, minerals and agriculture with the long-term potential revenue stream from eco-tourism. For these reasons, it is an ideal pilot and model project.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

We are partnering with the Uganda Wildlife Authority to create the Fund for Fallen Heroes.

This fund will support the families of wildlife rangers killed in the line of duty. In the past five years, more than 20 wildlife workers in Uganda have lost their lives while protecting some of the world's most endangered and threatened animals. These heroes leave behind children and partners that often find themselves destitute without their main breadwinner's income.

Education is not free in Uganda and the children of these fallen fighters will grow up without an education unless we help them. Please give what you can today to help us show some compassion for these families.

Uganda Wildlife Authority employs some of the best respected conservationists in Africa and they deserve our support. Just last year, a UWA ranger was awarded the prestigious Tusk Award, presented by HRH Prince William. He is credited with increasing the lion population in Murchison Falls National Park from 200 to 1600. You can read more about that here: Wildlife Ranger Wins Award

UWA currently employs approximately 1,500 rangers to cover about 71,000 square kilometres of protected area.
World Ranger Day, which is marked on July 31, is held in remembrance of rangers who died in the line of duty.
According to International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), rangers in Uganda, DR Congo and Rwanda have been directly responsible for an increase in the number of mountain gorillas, risking their lives to ensure the survival of this critically endangered species.
In northern Uganda, human impact on the land means that native animals can only be found in national parks such as Kidepo National Park. Here, the conflict between humans and wildlife is a constant battle for park rangers. They often find themselves in dangerous situations as a result of poachers entering the park.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of academic scholarships awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Adolescents, Children, Infants and toddlers, Preteens

Related Program

Scholarships

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Many schools were disrupted as a result of COVID-19 and therefore scholarships awarded to school age children were fewer. We added 6 university scholarships for graduates in Kenya.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are developing a holistic approach to conservation through community empowerment, a focus on the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals, alignment with Uganda’s Vision 2040 for Prosperity and a commitment to utilizing methodologies designed to reverse global warming and minimize climate change. This community we are assisting in rural Uganda will serve as a roadmap for similar impoverished areas, as a pilot for similar projects throughout Africa, and as a showcase for the world to see opportunities for synergy between people, planet and prosperity.

SCHOLARSHIPS
Since 2009 we have been providing scholarships to the children of conservation and wildlife protection workers. Many of these workers are based at PASA-accredited sanctuaries. We've given 900 children the chance to go to school in that time and many have gone on to graduate from university. We continue to expand this program every year and currently support children of workers at Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, Ngamba Island in Uganda, Ape Action Africa and Limbe Wildlife Center in Cameroon and Chimp Eden in South Africa. We also have a school lunch program at a school we built in Zambia for the children of workers at Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage.

INFRASTRUCTURE
We are currently working on Myende Conservation Community in Uganda. This community will feature a school, vocational skills center and hospital, designed with sustainability and the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals in mind. This community will be a model for future communities in Africa and will benefit hundreds of people living in a remote fishing community in Uganda. They are the nearest neighbor of the Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary and a community farm in Myende will provide food for the chimps and people on Ngamba.

FALLEN HEROES WILDLIFE FUND
This collaboration between Children of Conservation and the Uganda Wildlife Authority, provides support to the families of rangers killed in the line of duty. The rangers of the UWA risk their lives every day for the world's most endangered and threatened animals. If something happens to them, we make sure their family receives support and will sponsor their children's education.

ANTI-POACHING INITIATIVES - KENYA AND UGANDA
In Kenya, we partner with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust to negotiate contracts with villages around the outskirts of Tsavo East and West National Parks. These contracts are a deal between Children of Conservation and communities that would poach elephants. In exchange for scholarships for their brightest kids to attend national boarding school, they commit to cease all elephant hunting. This program has successfully operated in Kenya for four years.

In Uganda, we support Community Wildlife Scouts on the edges of Kidepo National Park. They ensure that even when the elephants stray outside the protected area of the national park, poachers who kill them for ivory are deterred, caught and prosecuted. However, they have no uniforms, boots, meals or other tech items that would make their job more achievable.

KEEPERS FOR KEEPERS
We facilitate long term relationships between African conservation workers in sanctuaries and their counterparts in the US and Europe. We ask that the US or European wildlife worker or zoo or sanctuary keeper donates a small amount every month to assist their African colleagues with basic necessities not normally afforded on their modest salaries, ie, food, medicine, clothing.

Working from the principles that we are empowering people, protecting the planet and building prosperity, we’ve tackled multiple problems in a variety of ways.

We have a proven track record of partnering with local communities to build community grown projects that benefit and empower people but highlight the synergy between conservation and prosperity.

Our initial work provided education scholarships for the children of sanctuary and conservation workers. This endeavor elevated the status of conservation jobs in their community and encouraged community members to value the lives of the animals. We expanded into anti-poaching initiatives in Kenya in association with David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, and in Ugada with the Uganda Wildlife Authority. We also have an initiative with the Uganda Wildlife Authority to provide support for the families of fallen wildlife rangers.

In 2017 we completed the construction of a high school in Zambia for the community surrounding the Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage. It is now successfully run by the government and overseen by the management of the sanctuary. It is completely self-sustaining and we currently fund only the school lunch program. It was during the construction of this school that we conceived the idea to holistically design a model conservation community to serve, not just the immediate community chosen, but to provide a blueprint for many other communities, districts and NGOs throughout Africa.

Children of Conservation’s successes have come as a result of taking a different approach to easing the negative impact of human expansion on wildlife. We have sought to understand the ‘why’, instead of just solving the ‘what’.
This has allowed us to investigate the root of the problem. Our flexibility and ability to pivot for each community’s needs has allowed us to maximize the impact of our work for conservation.

Our philosophy is simple. We work on an intimate level with communities that impact conservation to identify the root of why they are engaging in activities that damage habitats. By having the philosophy of seeking first to understand, we can try to solve the problems, while being consistent with and respectful of their culture. The results of programs built on this solid foundation speak for themselves. It means that our programs are successful, strong, sustainable and impactful.
We are taking on a new incredibly impactful pilot project; transforming a poverty-stricken fishing village in Uganda with no access to formal education or healthcare, no running water or electricity, poor sanitation, limited clean water and no opportunity for skills development into a model conservation community that can be replicated across the continent. This project is the collective vision of the community’s 22 leaders, the local and national governments, the Uganda Wildlife Authority and our partner sanctuary – Chimpanzee Sanctuary and Wildlife Conservation Trust. Together, we are developing a holistic approach to conservation through community empowerment, a focus on the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable
Development Goals, alignment with Uganda’s Vision 2040 for Prosperity and a commitment to utilizing methodologies designed to reverse global warming and minimize climate change. This community will serve as a roadmap for Uganda in similar impoverished areas, as a pilot for similar projects throughout Africa, and as a showcase for the world to see opportunities for synergy between people, planet and prosperity.

The community chosen is the Myende fishing village off the coast of Entebbe in Uganda’s Lake Victoria, just minutes away from the Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary and home to a biodiverse population of birds, many of which are unique to this area. Like most rural but environmentally important villages, Lake Victoria’s fishing villages are the most under-served communities in the country due to their remoteness and comparatively low population
densities. Myende has a direct impact on the neighboring Chimpanzee Sanctuary, is safe and comparatively accessible. It is also located in an extremely biodiverse country that struggles to balance the immediate benefits of environmentally degrading investments in oil, minerals and agriculture with the long-term potential revenue stream from eco-tourism. For these reasons, it is an ideal pilot and model project.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Children of Conservation Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Children of Conservation Inc

Board of directors
as of 08/04/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Michele Stumpe

Kerry Stumpe

Myrna Antar

Dennis Dean

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/28/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.