CAPITAL CITY VILLAGE INC

Stay Where You Live, Live Well Where You Stay

aka Capital City Village   |   Austin, TX   |  www.capitalcityvillage.org

Mission

Mission Statement
To create a community of members, volunteers and services to provide participating seniors the help and information they need to successfully age in place.

Notes from the nonprofit

Capital City Village is an Austin-based nonprofit dedicated to helping seniors stay in their homes and communities for as long as possible, a concept called aging in place and community. We achieve this mission through volunteers, providers and programs.

Member Services
The benefits of membership to Capital City Village include VOLUNTEERS, PROVIDERS AND PROGRAMS. CCV Volunteers are ready to help with transportation, errands and companionship; CCV Providers are ready to help with professional projects and services like roofing, plumbing and home healthcare–all licensed professionals who often offer discounts to CCV Members; and CCV Programs which are free or low-cost and designed to keep members connected to all Austin has to offer, from educational to cultural to healthy outings and events.

The Virtual Village and Aging in Place and Community
The members and volunteers of Capital City Village, a “virtual” village, have joined together in pursuit of a common goal – to live and comfortably in our own homes and communities while remaining healthy and active. We are building a community of helpers who aren’t necessarily your friends or relatives, whom you don’t mind calling because they are your fellow members and you’re not “putting them out.”

Why Join?
For each member, the needs are different. Some have joined to help others, and to ensure that this village will be here when they need it. Others have joined because of an immediate need for services or healthy activities. Many have joined for the social interaction that comes with coffees, cultural activities and educational programs. Read the full list of membership levels and benefits here.

Planning Ahead
Whatever you need to live independently, Capital City Village is here for you. Give your children and relatives peace of mind and join today, even if you “don’t need it yet.” Think of it as an insurance policy for your future, even if that future comes suddenly, in the form of a broken arm or unforeseen surgery. CCV will be here to drive you to the grocery store or doctor’s appointment when you can’t do it yourself. Even if you just need someone to talk to, we are here for you.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Ms. Tommi Ferguson

Main address

3710 Cedar St Ste 283

Austin, TX 78705 USA

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EIN

27-0539952

NTEE code info

Community Coalitions (S21)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Village Connections

Village Connections evolved from a model pioneered by the Capitol Hill Village in Washington, D.C. It is designed to meet the needs of our highest needs members, those that are often facing a major ongoing health issue, disability or temporary crisis. The program is launching with 12 members, and its primary goals are to:
o identify the direct services these members need (those that can be met by CCV and those that may require the resources of other agencies);
o provide one-on-one volunteer to member connection on a regular basis to combat isolation;
o provide guidance and tools so members can remain in control of their own lives.

We project that Village Connections will make a significant impact on our members’ lives, supporting our mission to assist seniors successfully age in place and community. We will track results based on program attendance, services received as noted by members and through our in-house tracking system.

The program will begin with implementation of home assessments for each client. Assessments will include a measurement tool designed to track changes over the course of the program. Sample questions include:
1) How long do you feel you will be able to stay at home?
2) How many CCV programs do you attend?
3) What barriers prevent you from attending programs?
4) What medical conditions affect your daily life?
5) What village services do you currently use?
6) What outside services do you use from any other agency, business or government provider?
7) Is service linkage required and if so, what types of services are needed?
Quantitative:
We measure the change to our members by their connection to volunteers and the goal for this is at least a weekly contact. We anticipate:
o program attendance by these members will be increased by two instances;
o service requests from members will occur in a more timely and ongoing fashion and this will be measured by calls and emails received and tracked in our database;
o high renewal rate (barring death or change in status) of these members at over 85%;
o high level of volunteer retention of the volunteers involved;
o and fewer hospital readmissions (as reported by members).

Qualitative:
With personal follow up conducted by staff to each member, we assess member satisfaction on an ongoing basis. We anticipate that Volunteer Connection members will identify that they feel more engaged and connected to the Village. We expect this program to increase the number of years members are able to remain at home and we believe members will gain a sense of control over their schedules and lives.

As this is a new program, based on an existing model, we plan to adopt the Capitol Hill Village’s report on the results of their six-month pilot period for our program goals.

While we recognize that not every member will be able to stay at home, we count as success any additional amount of time they are able to do, so as a result of membership.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To serve as many seniors as possible, especially underserved and economically disadvantaged seniors
To reach all of Austin
To increase our volunteer base in line with our member base
To increase our Amplify Austin donors and first-time donors
To increase our events and offerings in quality and quantity
To find innovative solutions to the Austin transportation problem and how it affects seniors

We send regular press releases; work hard to increase our SEO for our website and social media; conduct regular open houses around Austin to acquaint Austinites with CCV; we hold regular volunteer orientations to effectively train volunteers; we partner with other community organizations and for profit businesses to assist in referrals and provide service; we are working with the City to work on transportation solutions.

Our board, committees, staff and volunteers all offer major capabilities, skills and services and have years of experience in volunteer management, working with seniors, delivering programs and providing direct services.

We are netting 2 members per month (our goal); along with generally 4-5 volunteers per month; we have already reached 72 member service requests for just the first half of the year (compared to 62 for all of last year); and our contacts have almost doubled for the year compared to last year. We are serving more people than ever.

Financials

CAPITAL CITY VILLAGE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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CAPITAL CITY VILLAGE INC

Board of directors
as of 12/29/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Scott Blech

L. Sue Hoffman

Retired licensed clinical social worker and marriage and family therapist. Past President of the ENDRIA Board of Directors.

Doug Bell

Doug is a semi-retired civil engineer with 50 years of experience. He works part-time as an expert witness in construction law cases. His involvement in community affairs includes founder & board member of Trinity Center, a homeless shelter in downtown Austin, Vestry member at St. David’s Episcopal

Tom Knutsen

Since retiring from the Lower Colorado River Authority in the summer of 2007, he's volunteered on church missions, helped youngsters read at Blackshear Elementary School, driven regularly for Drive a Senior, and volunteered with CCV.

Barbara Epstein

Barbara is an Austin attorney who provides low-cost legal advice primarily to older adults. Her work history includes assignments at the General Land Office, Texas Railroad Commission, Texas Legal Services, and private practice.

Heather Potts

Former Marketing Director at Westminster Senior Living.

Scott Blech

Scott has led local, state and international associations during his 35-year career in association management.

Pam Farley

Pam trained and worked in Liverpool, England as an occupational therapist and was assigned through Voluntary Services Overseas to open the first occupational therapy training program in Kenya.

Gayle Hight

Her broad career experience includes marketing, sales promotion, higher education, and financial services.

Mart Hoffman

Mart has a long-term commitment to CCV and was one of the original founders. Mart's undergraduate degree is from SMU, and he has a Master's in Social Work from UT Austin and an MBA from St. Edward's University.

Dr. Tom McHorse

gastroenterologist

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes