GOLD2022

CHESTER COUNTY FOOD BANK

Beyond Hunger

Exton, PA   |  www.chestercountyfoodbank.org

Mission

We mobilize our community to ensure access to real, healthy food.

Ruling year info

2009

CEO

Ms. Andrea Youndt

Main address

650 Pennsylvania Drive

Exton, PA 19341 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-0887311

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Those who are food insecure are not only hungry but also lack the quality and diversity of nutritious foods needed to sustain a healthy lifestyle. The experience of food insecure households in Chester County is often masked by high median incomes and favorable health statistics. However, what cannot be seen with surface level statistics are the many residents who struggle, burdened by financial hardships and high cost of living. According to the United Way’s ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) report, a family of four paying for childcare needs an annual income of $78,720 to pay for the basic living costs in Chester County. Based on these estimations, 1 in 4 households or about 51,000 total households struggle to make ends meet. These estimations were established prior to COVID. Based on our observations and connections in the community, we know that there are now more families who need emergency food assistance.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Distribution

Thank you for the opportunity to share with you the mission and programs of Chester County Food Bank. For over a decade, CCFB has delivered on our mission to mobilize our community to ensure access to real, healthy food. Rooted in community as the central hunger relief organization in Chester County, we work side by side with over 160 network partner agencies to address hunger and food insecurity. Those we serve are feeling the vast impact of COVID-19 and now more than ever, we see families unable to put food on the table. We know those who are food insecure are not only hungry, but also lacking the quality and diversity of nutritious foods needed to sustain a healthy lifestyle, leaving them at elevated risk for stress and chronic diseases. We provide individualized food deliveries to 160 community partners including food pantries, hot meal sites, shelters, schools, senior centers based on the unique cultural needs of each organization. Focusing on fresh and local food is a priority, 43% of the food the CCFB distributes is fresh vegetables, fruit and dairy. At the pantry level, we utilize our Best Choices program to help expand capacity for providing nutritious foods.

Along with critically needed food distribution the Chester County Food Bank has developed focused programing in education, nutrition, workforce development and agriculture. We feel that these programs are what will move our neighbors BEYOND HUNGER.

We know that for some time to come our neighbors will feel the effects of this unprecedented moment in time. We affirm our dedication to dignified access to food, equitable distribution with an emphasis on addressing the root causes of hunger.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

In addition to our general distribution to food pantries, we provide specialized boxes for high-risk populations (seniors, children, and pregnant mothers) based on their unique preferences and nutritional needs:

Senior Box Program – Seniors receive monthly boxes from a senior center or their living facility. This program also provides the opportunity to engage with seniors with newsletters and recipes.
Backpack Program – In partnership with schools, Head Start, and after-school programs, students take home a biweekly package of food for their weekend meals. We also assist schools who are transitioning to a School Food Pantry as well as provide popup markets for students. Additionally, we work with school districts to fill food gaps resulting from COVID-19.
Prenatal Box Program – Pregnant moms who screen positive for food insecurity receive a box of food at their prenatal appointments.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Children and youth

Fresh2You (F2Y) travels throughout Chester County providing fresh, high-quality foods from local farmers paired with education on healthy cooking and local agriculture. To make fresh local food accessible to all members of our communities, F2Y accepts all forms of payment including SNAP and Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program (FMNP). Purchases made with SNAP or FMNP vouchers are matched with Veggie Bucks, which can be used on future purchases of fruits and vegetables. F2Y makes real, healthy food a reality in the county’s most food insecure areas. In response to COVID-19, shopping is now available through pre-order with contactless pickup for seniors and other high-risk individuals. Featuring items grown at CCFB’s farm sites, customers have the option to purchase a pre-packed recipe box with 5-7 seasonal items. Fresh2You continues to partner with six health clinics to provide Fruit and Vegetable Prescriptions (FVRx) to underinsured individuals screening positive for food insecurity by their healthcare providers. These prescriptions can be redeemed at any Fresh2You mobile market location. We consistently see improvements in participants’ biometric data and other health indicators after participating in the program.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

EatFresh is a bilingual series cooking classes that emphasizes whole foods, local produce, navigating your food environment, and cultural traditions. Eat Fresh participants receive a bag of fresh produce with each class. In response to COVID-19 classes are now pre-recorded with digital meetings so participants can stay connected. Produce boxes are picked up at their normal pick-up location. In response to COVID-19, the class is now recorded and available through live zoom meetings and the shares of produce can be picked up at their regular locations. Our produce shares continue to be all Pennsylvania grown with 60% coming from our own Chester County Food Bank farm sites. The new class structure has allowed participants to stay connected and has sparked creativity in our passionate staff. They provide fun and interactive ways to keep participants engaged with the program. Last month’s virtual class provided the opportunity for viewers to “vote” on which fresh ingredients to use while the instructor was cooking live. Our participants have been enjoying the classes and are excited to have the flexibility to watch at home with their families in a way that aligns with their schedules. Because of the virtual format, we have been able to add many more participants then we have ever had previously. To view an EatFresh class please visit: https://vimeo.com/channels/EatFreshccfb

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Raised Bed Garden Program provides support in building and maintaining 87 of Chester County’s raised bed gardens. The program provided nearly 57,000 seedlings to partner gardens to help grow about 35,000 lbs of produce. The produce from these gardens is donated back to our network of food cupboards, meal sites and social service organizations in addition to being used in classroom education. We will be piloting a virtual round of the gardening class series Seed to Supper to provide a safe learning experience for participants. Developed by Oregon Food Bank and Oregon State University Extension Service, Seed to Supper is a beginning gardening course that teaches participants how to grow a portion of their own food on a limited budget. The course highlights practical, low-cost techniques for planning and maintaining a successful vegetable garden.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

FRESHSTART Kitchen™ is a culinary arts workforce development training program providing opportunities to those with employment barriers and powering local economic growth. The program has a fully certified production kitchen and a uniquely qualified staff. Designed to help individuals with limited work experience, academic skills and personal challenges, the program provides life skills to address challenges entering the workforce. COVID-19 has had major impacts on the lives of former graduates. Our FRESHSTART team has assisted graduates with obtaining emergency food and SNAP, applying for unemployment after restaurant closures, and providing consistent emotional support while navigating difficult times. With the guidance of industry experts, the classroom structure is being reimagined to encompass virtual and hybrid learning. As the employment landscape shifts for the restaurant industry, our team is diligently researching new models that include social enterprise as a central focus of instruction. Incorporating social enterprise helps students to be better equipped for pursuing additional avenues of employment and opportunities to run their own businesses.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Our culinary team develops nutritional and delicious meals for homebound seniors. They are available as daily hot meals or frozen in bulk.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For every 12 lbs of food distributed, it provides 10 meals to those in need. CCFB distributed 3.2 million lbs of food in 2019.

Pounds of produce distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our programs and services are designed with a holistic approach to go beyond hunger and alleviate the complex issues related to food insecurity.

To mobilize our community.

The agricultural bounty of our area, coupled with volunteers, funders and partners has enabled us to evolve as we address hunger and food insecurity.

From the onset, improving access to nutritious foods was a strategy accomplished through strategic food production, processing, and provisioning. After establishing ourselves as the central hunger-relief organization in the county, we built upon our existing opportunities for education, health, and wellness to expand our reach and provide even more depth in our programs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Anyone in Chester County experiencing food insecurity.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We added Community Food Advocates - people who live in the communities we serve - to market our programs and collect knowledge about needs. We also strive to distribute culturally sensitive foods.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

CHESTER COUNTY FOOD BANK
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CHESTER COUNTY FOOD BANK

Board of directors
as of 03/01/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Robert McNeil

Kevin McDermott

Delphi Wealth Management Group

Anand Solanki

Citadel Federal Credit Union

Kate Sheehan

QVC

Patrick Ward

WSFS Bank

Joe Riper

Brad Dyer

Yvonne Bartlett

Jennifer Simpson

Ryan Walter

Ruthie Kranz-Carl

Ed Breiner

Miguel Alban

Customers Bank

Jennifer Simpson

Florence Zheng

Urias Cole

Robert McNeil

Melinda McCann

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/22/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/08/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.