PLATINUM2023

WOMEN, FOOD AND AGRICULTURE NETWORK

Growing Together

aka WFAN   |   Ames, IA   |  www.wfan.org

Mission

Our mission is to engage women in building an ecological and just food and agricultural system through individual and community power.

Notes from the nonprofit

Since its inception, Women, Food and Agriculture Network has been considered a network-based membership organization. We had operated on the idea that everyone who has impacted—or has been impacted by—our work, either as a participant in one of our workshops or learning circles, or as a donor was a “member” of WFAN. Then, prior to the pandemic, we briefly moved to a tiered, dues-based membership model. After careful consideration during the pandemic, we are seeking to return to our roots and expand our community of supporters through an inclusive donation-based membership model that is rooted in intentional alignment and engagement with WFAN. Thus, if you gift WFAN with your time, talent, or treasure in support of our mission, values and vision, we are thrilled to include you in the WFAN member community.

Ruling year info

2011

Executive Director

Ms. Juliann Salinas

Main address

PO Box 611

Ames, IA 50010 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-0897403

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (K01)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Women's Rights (R24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

WFAN's strategic plan seeks to incorporate evaluation of our evolution since WFAN’s non-profit establishment in 1997, as well as our aspirations and intentions for the next three years. The goals are ambitious, but requisite to meet the moment in which we find ourselves. Incremental changes are not adequately responsive to the exponentially worsening climate crisis, deepening racial and gender inequities, public health uncertainties, and nationwide food insecurities compounded by rising costs and unprecedented income disparities. Additionally, we know that it is critical to continue to identify, address and resist the extractive monoculture practices we see in the Midwest and throughout the country. We will continue to include and fight for rural women and non-binary folx in agriculture, building upon decades of activism and leadership development, while working to expand our membership and build solidarity with those in urban areas.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Women Caring for the Land

We provide women landowners with current information on best practices for improving soil and water quality on their farmland. We hold peer-to-peer women-only meetings with landowner and conservation professionals, provide written information and a website for further resources.

Population(s) Served
Low-income people
Farmers
Women
Transgender people
Activists

We provide aspiring and beginning women farmers with on- and off-farm mentorships, business training, and structured networking opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Working poor
Low-income people
Transgender people
Women
Farmers

Providing leadership development to women engaged in healthy food and farming.

Population(s) Served
Activists
Farmers
Low-income people
Women
Transgender people

Launched as a pilot project in 2020, initially in response to the COVID-19 crisis, and then pivoting to respond to the murder of George Floyd and the subsequent racial reckoning, GCR creates space for our members to gather and address current events impacting them, their families, and their communities. Anticipated GCR activities and events in 2022-2025 include hosting and facilitating conversations and events that address relevant issues including equitable land access for beginning and young farmers; education on and exploration of alternative, collective and progressive land ownership and stewardship models; education and conversation centered on BIPOC stewardship of, and access to, land past and present; and uplifting LGBTQ+ voices in food and agriculture.

Population(s) Served

WFAN conferences – even virtually - always offer the approximate 300 farmers, food producers, advocates, educators, and students who attend a chance to share the good work that they do, to gain inspiration from one another, and to refresh and ignite their spirits, passions, and friendships. The annual conference is also our opportunity to learn from our peers, build a stronger network, and foster connections for long-lasting change.
Our conference will:
Build and strengthen anti-oppression knowledge, initiatives, and action through training, reflection, and collaboration.
Provide practical farm-based educational opportunities for beginning through seasoned agrarians, landowners, and food systems advocates.
Increase our capacity as land caretakers to define, create, and implement practices rooted in ecological justice.
Offer intentional spaces for critical dialogue, networking, coalition building, and story-sharing.
The full workshop agenda typically covers topics such as regenerative a

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
LGBTQ people
Activists
Farmers
Students
Women and girls
LGBTQ people
Activists
Farmers
Students

Where we work

Awards

Iowa Environmental Excellence Award 2013

Iowa Governor's Office

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Farmers, Women and girls

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These include programs, conferences, workshops. These are aggregate numbers and there may be some duplication in participants across offerings

Number of conference attendees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Farmers, Women and girls, Intersex people, Lesbians, Transgender people

Related Program

WFAN Annual Conference

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The pandemic decreased total conference attendance, which went virtual in 2020 in response to the pandemic. We anticipate numbers to increase again once in-person or hybrid offerings are available.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

WFAN's goal is to empower women to build a world in which food systems and communities are healthy, just, sustainable, and promote environmental integrity.

We achieve our goals by having our values guide all that we do, including:

Ecological Relationship with the Land
-WFAN values human and non-human species diversity, habitat restoration, and ecosystem-centric approaches to land use.
-WFAN believes in the core restorative and agricultural principles of soil building, natural habitat revival, and holistic land stewardship approaches grounded in respect for natural systems and cycles.
Interconnectedness
-WFAN values the interconnection of ecological justice and gender equity and believes that we cannot address one without addressing the other.
-WFAN values relationship building over transactional partnerships.

Storytelling
-WFAN values the power of story as a means of connection, communication and knowledge sharing.
-WFAN values diverse ways of learning and information exchange which are critical to shifting the dominant narratives in food and agriculture systems.

Ecofeminism
-WFAN values an ecofeminist approach to inclusive community (plant, animal, human, soil, water, air) regeneration which grows from a space beyond gender-normed definitions.
-WFAN values a relationship with ecological systems that is rooted in reciprocity and compassion.

Justice
-WFAN values an anti-racist approach to food and agriculture systems from the ground up, including food and land reparations.
-WFAN supports policies that are drafted and implemented by, for and with Black, Indigenous, and People Of Color (BIPOC) communities.
-WFAN believes that a relationship with healthy food and clean water is a right, not a privilege.
-WFAN believes equity is requisite to creating a respectful, responsive, and inclusive approach to food systems.
-WFAN values ensuring animal welfare as an intrinsic part of a just and healthy food system.

We will provide networking, education, and leadership development opportunities to women engaged in healthy food and farming. Some examples include a resource-rich website, periodic publications, and local, regional and national meetings for women on topics including farming, land management, and leadership development.

Our staff and board are composed of women with a great deal of passion for and experience in developing healthy localized food systems, and working toward gender equity for women. We work with our funding partners to provide programming to achieve our goals.

We have built the network from fewer than 300 members, allies and co-conspirators in 1997 to more than 9,000 in 2022. We have increased our budget from $30,000 in 2008 to $487,061 in 2022. We have increased from one to four staff members. We have attracted investments for program funding from a variety of foundations, as well as state and federal agencies. Evaluations of our programs from our constituents continue to be positive, and we have been able to respond to emerging concerns and areas of interest.

Perhaps most importantly, we have codified our values, clarified our vision, and strengthened our resolve to our mission, moving forward as a progressive, inclusively feminist, anti-racist organization committed to building just and ecological food and agricultural systems.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Women and non-binary people in agriculture and food systems.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In 2020 we started a conversation convening series, Growing Community Resilience, initially in response to COVID-19. However, with the murder of George Floyd, and the feedback of our members and affiliates, we pivoted to intentional anti-racism work and discussions and how racial discrimination shows up in agriculture and food systems. This is now the lens through which we are viewing all WFAN programming.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has helped us evolve from a Midwest (regional) organization to a national organization, with the broadening of our network

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

WOMEN, FOOD AND AGRICULTURE NETWORK
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WOMEN, FOOD AND AGRICULTURE NETWORK

Board of directors
as of 01/27/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Maritza Pierre

Doctoral Candidate

Term: 2020 - 2023


Board co-chair

Ms. Celize Christy

Practical Farmers of IA

Term: 2020 - 2023

Hannah Breckbill

Humble Hands Farms

Angie Carter

Michigan Tech University

Ahna Kruzic

Pesticide Action Network

Diahann Lohr

Adunate Word and Design

Erin Meyer

UC Merced

Carly Nichols

University of IA

Kelly Nuckolls

National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition

Corbin Scholz

Rainbow Roots Farm

Jennifer Taylor

Organic Farmer

Elizabeth Hayes

Director, Cloud Mountain Farm Center

Lijing Gao

PhD Candidate, IA State University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/13/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.