EQUINE AID

Respect for All Beings

aka Equine Aid Horse and Donkey Rescue   |   Monroe, WA   |  www.equineaid.org

Mission

Providing rescue and rehabilitation, placement or sanctuary for equines at risk and to serve as a voice against all abuse.

Notes from the nonprofit

We have been in operation for over twenty years. We consider our strongest quality to be our commitment to the animals we rescue for the rest of their lives. We remain in contact with adopters and provide those who surrender animals to us with whatever information they would like to have on those animals. Animals who are not adopted have lifetime sanctuary here. We respect people and animals and strive to offer our best to all.

Ruling year info

2010

president

Geri Vincent

Herd Manager

Ms. Lennis none Mullin none

Main address

(US Mail) PO Box 123

Monroe, WA 98272 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-0939854

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

Single Organization Support (D11)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

- Equine Abuse - Equine Neglect - The slaughter of America's wild and domestic horses and donkeys - Equine Care - Not breeding equines

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Equine Rescue and Rehabilitation

Neglected or abused horses, ponies and asses accepted into this program will receive prompt veterinary attention. Emergent care if needed, otherwise a health update including dental care, vaccinations, worming and hoof care. Training is provided based on what each animal needs. Ongoing health care and training is provided until adoption when adopters sign a contract to commit to that care. At any time that an adopter cannot care for an animal is is returned to Equine Aid. If an animal is not adopted, we are committed to providing care for life.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with disabilities

We are committed to every equine we accept. If they are found to not be suitable for adoption or desired by adopters, they remain with us for life. We never euthanize for convenience, only upon veterinary advice that euthanasia is in the animal's best interest.

Population(s) Served
Adults

During the spring and summer, groups of disabled adults come to Equine Aid to assist with grooming the gentle animals and helping with chores.
We also also provide volunteer and visiting opportunities for other adults and children with disabilities. With each person, their safety and abilities determine their level of participation.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries 2021

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals are to educate the public about responsibility for any animal they adopt and their commitment to protecting the voiceless. Those lessons include information on the very real risks of equines going to slaughter or negligent homes.

While several local equine rescues only accept animals from government agencies or from slaughter pens, we focus on owner surrenders. The reasoning is that we want to prevent equines from going to auction or Craigslist and being sold to anyone, no matter their intent. Desperate owners resort to those options when rescues won't accept their animals. Of course it is best that an owner maintain a lifetime steward for any animal they commit to. But life throws people curves that they can't plan for, such as divorce and illness. Our goal is to protect the animals in these situations from slaughter or neglectful homes.

We maintain a herd of, at minimum, twenty assorted equines: horses, ponies, donkeys and hinnys. A few of these animals are part of our sanctuary program, most are available for adoption. Every animal here receives all needed health care for life. Our focus is accepting at risk animals whose owners are in crisis.

I believe that 175 successful adoptions is great progress. These animals and those who love them are provided a soft landing.

We continue to share a great deal in regard to caring properly for equines at any time and with anyone.

We provide education and encourage awareness of the equine slaughter issue in the United States: what it involves, who perpetuates it, why all horses are at risk and what each of us can do to protect equines from entering the slaughter pipeline.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Typically the people we serve by accepting their surrendered animals have life-threatening health issues, age-related issues, financial or relationship issues. When these occur we try to limit their already stressful situation by providing a a safe and caring place for them to release their animals. Those who adopt the animals come from various financial, racial and gender/sexual orientation backgrounds. We are open to anyone who has compassion for our rescued animals and a desire to help.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes, discussions,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We updated our mission statement to include that we serve as a voice against all abuse. The intent is to include people in that phrase as well as animals.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Generally they feel more included in our organization when they are given a voice.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

EQUINE AID
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

EQUINE AID

Board of directors
as of 10/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Gerrone Vincent

No Affiliation

Term: 2009 - 2022

Sabato Sorice

Equine Aid

Geri Vincent

Equine Aid

Lennis Mullin

Equine Aid

Jessica Hayden

Equine Aid

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/14/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.