PLATINUM2023

City Teaching Alliance

Empowering Educators, Transforming Futures

aka City Teaching Alliance   |   Baltimore, MD   |  www.cityteachingalliance.org

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Mission

At City Teaching Alliance (formerly Urban Teachers), our mission is to improve educational and life outcomes of children in urban schools by preparing culturally responsive, effective career educators who accelerate student achievement and disrupt systems of racial and socioeconomic inequity.

Ruling year info

2010

CEO

Mr. Peter Shulman

Main address

8 Market Place Suite 410

Baltimore, MD 21202 USA

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Formerly known as

Urban Teacher Center

EIN

27-0989006

NTEE code info

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

All students can learn at high levels and achieve strong outcomes when they have access to an excellent education, regardless of background or past barriers. Still, we have yet to ensure that our students of color and those living in poverty are consistently taught by highly qualified and committed educators. The education debt (NEPC, 2018) that historically underserved students have inherited is particularly stark in urban schools, where underprepared teachers and chronic turnover often result in precious instructional time lost. The difference in opportunity is reflected in disparities in academic outcomes, graduation rates and college enrollment. Thus, City Teaching Alliance is addressing two of the most pressing problems facing urban school districts today: the need for a pipeline of highly qualified, effective teachers who are retained year to year, and the need to provide students with empowering educational experiences so that they can become agents of change.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

City Teaching Alliance

At City Teaching Alliance, we recruit, prepare, develop, and support teachers to be highly effective, culturally responsive educators who empower every child through learning and stay in our classrooms over time. Our program participants become effective career educators committed to equity and inclusivity through a comprehensive four-year model specific to urban schools and communities, including a yearlong classroom residency prior to the first year of teaching, two years of master’s degree coursework leading to dual certification in a content area and special education, three years of personalized coaching, a minimum three-year post-residency teaching commitment, and full licensure conferred only after multiple years of demonstrated success.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of recruits who are of color

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

City Teaching Alliance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Current goal: 50% of the incoming resident group will identify as people of color; Data Collected at Selection, stored in the Urban Teachers Data Portal

Minimum average undergraduate GPA of incoming residents

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

City Teaching Alliance

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Current goal: Average undergraduate GPA of incoming residents will be at least 3.3; Data collected at Application, stored in the Urban Teachers Data Portal

Percentage of fall residents that will successfully complete the residency and begin their first year of teaching

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

City Teaching Alliance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Current goal: 80% of fall residents will successfully complete the residency and begin their first year of teaching

Percentage of program completers that will continue on as teachers or teacher leaders in the U.S.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

City Teaching Alliance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Current goal: At least 75% of the most recent class of 4-year program completers will continue on as teachers or teacher leaders in any location

Percentage of first year teachers rated as prepared by surveyed principals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

City Teaching Alliance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Current goal: At least 90% of first year teachers will be rated as prepared by surveyed principals

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At City Teaching Alliance, we seek to end educational disparities for underserved students to give them a level playing field and enhance their life outcomes. Our vision is that every student in the United States is taught by committed, well-prepared, culturally competent teachers.

We accomplish our mission by recruiting exceptional, equity-minded college graduates and equipping them with intensive, culturally relevant coursework, three years of coaching and ample practical experience in the classroom. We implement a four-year model with a 14-month residency to develop teachers who are deeply invested in the communities they serve and who stay in the classroom for the long term. City Teaching Alliance is recognized as a high-quality teacher preparation provider and an essential talent pipeline because we deliver teachers who empower students through learning and who help students become change agents in their communities.

Looking ahead, City Teaching Alliance’s strategic goals at the national level include the following:
- To nearly double our number of residents in the next 5 years
- To reduce reliance on philanthropy to <20% within the same timeframe
- To invest in research & development, data, and continuous improvement
- To explore opportunities for geographic and/or program expansion
- To establish City Teaching Alliance as a proof of concept that deeper, more rigorous clinical preparation is essential for the transformation of the profession and student outcomes

The most powerful school improvement mechanism is a talent pipeline of highly effective teachers. At City Teaching Alliance, we believe great teachers are the key to combating racial and socioeconomic inequality and educational disparities. Therefore, City Teaching Alliance is transforming learning for students in underserved communities by preparing accountable and effective teachers for students who need them most. Our teachers are culturally competent, prepared to work from an asset-based mindset to build on the strengths that all students bring to the classroom in order to remove systemic barriers to achievement and promote positive life outcomes for all learners.

Grounded in the assertion that preparation of effective career teachers takes many years, our program model is distinct. Our program is one of the most thorough teacher preparation programs in the nation, with a particularly substantial pre-service experience requirement and deep coaching and wrap-around support spanning teachers’ early years in the classroom. Our educators – and their students – benefit from a longer clinical residency, a more in-depth and holistic clinical graduate program, more side-by-side in-person coaching, dual certification in general and special education (with an additional certification for ESOL in Texas), and a longer commitment to our schools. We cultivate teachers who aspire to make teaching their long-term profession, so we prepare and support them to fulfill that dream.

In addition, knowing that recent research indicates that Black students who are taught by a Black teacher are more likely to graduate from high school and more likely to enroll in college than their peers who are not taught by a Black teacher (Gershenson et al., 2018), Urban Teachers is committed to increasing the diversity of the teacher workforce, with special emphasis on recruitment and preparation of teachers who identify as Black and/or Latinx.

City Teaching Alliance has grown significantly since our launch ten years ago– in staff, geographic locations, number of program participants, and number of students served. In SY2022-23, City Teaching Alliance welcomed and prepared 155 new resident teachers, and continued to support an additional 628 educators in varying states of program completion.

Throughout our post-pandemic stages of growth and refinement, City Teaching Alliance has continued to recruit a diverse cohort of teachers who are more reflective of the student populations we serve.

In our first year of operation, City Teaching Alliance placed participants in five public and charter schools in Baltimore City and five charter schools in Washington, DC. In 2019-20, City Teaching Alliance’s residents, teachers and alumni served in 285 schools across Baltimore, Washington, DC, and Dallas.

In April 2019, City Teaching Alliance underwent a comprehensive program review by a highly-regarded external organization, the Teacher Preparation Inspectorate (TPI-US). Over the course of a week, TPI inspectors spoke with 55 team members in 21 individual and group interviews, visited 14 participant classrooms, observed 14 coursework sessions, and met with three participant focus groups — all in addition to reviewing hundreds of pieces of program documents including output and outcome data. At the end of the inspection, City Teaching Alliance received a near-perfect score of 15 out of 16 across four domains, which include (1) Selection of Candidates, (2) Preparation in Content Knowledge and Teaching Methods, (3) Quality of Clinical Placement, and (4) Strength of Program Performance Management. Our “Strong” rating in three of the four domains is an accomplishment shared by only 5% or fewer of the 120+ evaluated programs nationally.

In May 2019, City Teaching Alliance secured a $25 million grant from Ballmer Group to recruit and retain 1,000 Black educators in our three regions over the next five residency classes. This gift is the foundation for City Teaching Alliance's Black Educator Initiative (BEI), which builds upon our decade-long track record of developing highly-qualified, diverse teachers for urban public schools. The majority of the funding will be used for scholarships (contingent on program and teaching milestones) going directly to our educators, with a small portion covering general core program operations. The grant, perhaps the largest of its kind, is specifically designed to increase the number of Black educators to become teachers through our program. This gift has the potential for transformational impact on the majority-black student populations of our partner cities — we know students taught by teachers that look like them (and all students) benefit from more diversity in teaching. It validates City Teaching Alliance as a leader nationally in addressing the crisis of teacher diversity in urban public schools.

Scale
Since beginning in 2009, City Teaching Alliance has reached 351,000 students with 2,400 exceptional educators. The organization’s residents, teachers and alumni are serving in 346 public and charter schools across three regions. City Teaching Alliance is now the single largest novice teacher provider of our kind in Washington, DC.

Teacher Effectiveness
In all three cities, our first-year teachers are demonstrating exemplary instructional practice and effectiveness with students. For example:

- Baltimore: Most recent available data from SY18-19 indicate that nearly all second-year teachers from Urban Teachers were rated as Effective or Highly Effective, outpacing all other second-year teachers in City Schools by more than 10 percentage points.

- Dallas: In SY2017-18, nearly double the percentage of City Teaching Alliance first year teachers were rated Proficient - the highest ranking available to first year teachers - compared to other Dallas ISD teacher pipelines.

Stakeholder survey results further confirm our participants’ preparation, with 96% of host teachers agreeing that residents provide additional value to student learning and 91% of participants agreeing or strongly agreeing that City Teaching Alliance training gave them the knowledge and skills needed to be effective in the classroom.

Teacher Retention
Of our most recent class of 4-year program completers, 92% are still working as a teacher or teacher leader, in any location.

Support for School Turnaround
City Teaching Alliance supports school turnaround in each of our three districts. City Teaching Alliance Dallas is an essential partner in the highly successful Accelerating Campus Excellence (ACE) school turnaround program. We now have residents at 11 of the ACE campuses that are currently assessed as highest needs (Tier 2.0 and 3.0 schools). In Baltimore, 62 residents are placed in either Comprehensive Support and Improvement Schools (Baltimore’s lowest-performing schools) or newly named Literacy Intensive Title I schools. In DC, we have finalized a new initiative to strategically place 16 SY19-20 residents in 8 high-need schools identified for intensive turnaround support (in addition to numerous other DCPS placements across the city and 53% of Ward 8 schools).

TPI-US
Since the inspection in April 2019, TPI-US has highlighted City Teaching Alliance for two promising practices in teacher preparation that they have encountered through their inspection work. TPIUS has featured the two practices - Admissions Process and Quality of Program Performance Management - on their website in order to help other programs around the country while giving credit to programs like ours that have developed and implemented the practices.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome

Financials

City Teaching Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

City Teaching Alliance

Board of directors
as of 09/05/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Sekou Biddle

Vice President, Advocacy and Student Professional Development Programs, UNCF

Term: 2021 -

Sekou Biddle

Vice President of Advocacy, UNCF

Adrienne Williams

Urban Teachers alumna; Director, Student Achievement Partners

Peter Shulman

CEO, Urban Teachers

Dianne Houghton

Director of Strategic Planning, Library of Congress

Ben Fenton

Chief Officer, Growth & Partnership Delivery, Instruction Partners

Gordon Johnson

Sr. VP, Commercial Operations Manager, M&T Bank

Gary Geisel

(Emeritus & Interim Finance Committee Chair) CEO, Provident Bankshares Corp. (Retired)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/18/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/17/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.