GOLD2022

The Center for Large Landscape Conservation

aka Center for Large Landscape Conservation   |   Bozeman, MT   |  www.largelandscapes.org

Mission

Engage, connect, and activate people and communities to protect the integrity of landscapes and ecosystems that maintain our climate and support life.

Ruling year info

2011

President

Dr. Gary Tabor

Chief Operations Officer

Kathy Perkes

Main address

PO Box 1587

Bozeman, MT 59771-1587 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-1226829

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

All over the world, human development has fractured landscapes. Habitats are isolated, roads and fence lines cut through migration routes, and rivers, forests, and food systems are suffering. As our cities and highways grow, we are losing the biodiversity that keeps our planet healthy. For most of the twentieth century, the response to these sweeping changes has been to try to offset the impacts by creating state and national parks, reserves, and other protected areas. But ecology teaches us that protected places like national parks cannot support plant and animal populations if they are surrounded by housing or cut off by highways. Development makes migration challenging, stifles genetic diversity, and limits opportunities for animals to adapt to climate change. To remain healthy, ecosystems must be connected. Species need to be able to shift and adapt in response to the changing climate, maximizing resiliency and increasing their likelihood of survival.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Resilience

Climate resilience and the restoration and protection of landscapes cannot happen without community participation. Our Community Resilience Program works in partnership with local governments, tribes, private landowners, non-profits, and faith groups to protect land and prepare for a changing climate. This program is driven by a dedication to real collaboration, environmental equity, and a desire to strengthen the work of communities by contributing science, planning, mentorship, and networking support. Within this program, we prioritize working with vulnerable and underserved communities, recognizing that the consequences of our changing planet are not equally distributed among its people.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Wildlife used to move freely across the landscape. Along the way, they made important contributions to the places they passed through—pollination, controlling pests, even shaping culture. Human development has made this movement increasingly difficult for plants and animals, just as climate change has made it more important than ever. The Corridors and Crossings Program protects critical migration routes and promotes habitat connectivity by advancing policies and projects at local, state, and federal levels that incentivize wildlife connectivity and reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions. Our inclusive approach links agencies, organizations, and communities in a shared effort to reconnect what has been fragmented.

Population(s) Served
Adults

After more than 40 collective years of protecting connectivity in North America, the Center is bringing knowledge and experience to bear on connectivity conservation issues worldwide. In the process, we serve as a hub for communities, individuals, and institutions across the globe, to develop solutions, implement projects, and achieve large-scale conservation. By engaging in conservation initiatives, including leading the Connectivity Conservation Specialist Group of the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas, our International Connectivity Program directly contributes to global efforts to connect and protect crucial habitat across terrestrial, marine, and freshwater ecosystems.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Fulbright Professional Scholar Award in Climate Change & Clean Energy 2013

Fulbright Scholar

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of publications and papers authored by staff

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For fiscal year 2018-2019

Number of conservation networks managed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fiscal Year 2018-2019

Number of communities and organizations we connected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fiscal Year 2018-2019

Number of landscape conservation partnerships we support

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In fiscal year 2018-2019, we supported 14 landscape conservation partnerships through the Catalyst Fund.

Number of internships provided for early conservation professionals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fiscal Year 2018-2019

Number of on-the-ground connectivity projects and crossing structures we provided guidance on

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fiscal Year 2018-2019

Number of federal, state, and local policies we advised on

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fiscal Year 2018-2019

Number of land management plans we advocated for wildlife corridors and habitat connectivity

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fiscal Year 2018-2019

Number of countries we advised partners about connectivity conservation and road ecology in

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fiscal Year 2018-2019

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Center for Large Landscape Conservation is a leader in the global movement to restore ecosystem health by reversing fragmentation, protecting connections, and building climate change resilience on the landscapes that sustain human and wild life. Guided by a team of specialists in everything from spatial ecology and sociology, to climate science and international law, we are defining best practices in connectivity conservation.

But it is not enough to build knowledge—power comes from using those insights to inform, connect, and empower others. So this is where we put our focus. Our technical and strategic support fortifies projects, builds and strengthens communities, and tactically connects initiatives in a way that the whole becomes more than the sum of its parts. We work at the birds-eye view so other organizations don’t have to, keeping a big- picture perspective that knits landscapes and people together, making their efforts as efficient, effective, and creative as possible.

Our mission is to protect and restore ecosystem health at local, national, and international scales by uniting and empowering conservation efforts, building climate resilience, and protecting and connecting the landscapes that sustain humans and wildlife. Our approach is three-fold:

•Provide leadership to the international conservation community by defining best practices
in connectivity conservation and acting as a hub for global initiatives

•Amplify the conservation efforts of communities, governments, and non-profits through
technical and strategic support

•Contribute to regional, national, and international conservation policy and law by educating
decision makers, providing expertise, and drafting legislation

For the networks below, we provide strategic counsel and organizational management, supporting their members and staff to focus on engaging and empowering landscape conservation projects, processes, and practitioners and worldwide.

Big environmental problems like the ones we tackle require a multi-disciplinary approach— no organization can do it alone. Our theory of change is that if each of us brings our perspectives and skills to the table, together we can create the future we want. Our work is deeply collaborative. We convene partners from across disciplines to achieve this collective vision.
We also contribute our own unique expertise through four key focus areas, which have been identified for the crucial role they play in connecting and protecting large landscapes:


•Science
•Policy
•Community Planning
•Organizational Mentorship and Networking

This approach sets us apart as leaders in the connectivity conservation movement and clearly defines the contributions we make to our partners.

As for accomplishments, we have become nationally recognized for our work in wildlife corridor and ecological connectivity conservation with awards from the Federal Highways Administration for Excellence in Environmental Sustainability 2015 and with the recognition received from Patagonia with helping to develop its Freedom to Roam campaign and the Western Governors Association's wildlife corridor initiative. With regards to large scale conservation efforts, the Center for Large Landscape Conservation is honored to be one of only four non-profits that sits on the Department of Interior's Landscape Conservation Cooperation Council. In 2016, one of our lead initiatives -- the Roundtable of the Crown of the Continent (the 18 million acre ecosystem around Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park) received the inaugural Climate Adaptation Award by the Joint Implementation Committee of the US National Fish, Wildlife and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy. In September 2016, our Center was asked to serve as home of the World Commission on Protected Areas' newly created Connectivity Conservation Specialist Group to facilitate connectivity and large scale conservation implementation globally. To connect nature, we strive to connect people.

We have not accomplished a National Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act with Congress which we have been working on since 2007 which would preserve wildlife corridors nationwide through a unified designation. We continue to strive to get State Departments of Wildlife to invest in building more wildlife crossing structures. Working at the large scale on climate adaptation is always a struggle in a resource limited environment based on state budgets. This has challenged our work on climate adaptation with local communities and tribes. In the near future we have been tasked to come up with a new global protected area designation called Areas of Connectivity Conservation. We hope that in the next 2-4 years it will become a reality.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

The Center for Large Landscape Conservation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Center for Large Landscape Conservation

Board of directors
as of 09/21/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Victoria Mars

Mars Incorporated

Term: 2022 -

Thomas McHenry

Vermont Law School

Rick Weyerhaeuser

Sonen Capital

Michael Hankin

Brown Advisory

Jason Kibbey

Sustainable Apparel Coalition

Victoria Mars

Mars, Inc.

Martin Kaplan

Retired Partner, WilmerHale

Vicky Collins

Cynthia McVay

Field Farm

Robert Kieval

Diligence Matters, LLC

Douglas Foy

Serrafix Corporation

Mary C Pearl

Macaulay Honors College

Mamie A Parker

Ma Parker and Associates

Meg O'Leary

M20 Group

Kerry Omughelli

Bain & Company

Rick West

Autry Museum of the American West

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/7/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/17/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.