PLATINUM2022

EDIBLE SCHOOLYARD NYC

Supporting edible education for every child in New York City

aka Edible Schoolyard NYC   |   New York, NY   |  https://www.edibleschoolyardnyc.org/

Mission

Edible Schoolyard NYC’s mission is to support edible education for every child in New York City. We partner with New York City public schools to cultivate healthy students and communities through hands-on cooking and gardening education, transforming children’s relationship with food.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Shanon Morris

Main address

PO Box 737

New York, NY 10163 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-1237249

NTEE code info

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

Agricultural Programs (K20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our food system is failing us and holding our children back. The effects of this inequitable system are profound: nearly one in four children in New York City is food insecure, and over 50% of New York City public school children are obese or overweight. Diet-related health issues account for almost 75% of preventable deaths in the U.S. This issue has a disproportionate affect on low-income communities and communities of color. Here in New York City, obesity rates in East Harlem are three times what they are on the Upper East Side, just a few blocks away. A child born into poverty is twice as likely to be overweight than her more affluent peers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Demonstration Schools

Demonstration Schools are at the heart of Edible Schoolyard NYC programming. At these schools, Edible Schoolyard NYC builds and maintains gardens and kitchen classrooms, and has a dedicated staff including two full time kitchen teachers, two full time garden teachers and a community outreach coordinator. Every child in the school receives 1-2 garden and kitchen lessons per month, aligned with common core and relevant standards. Lessons are incorporated into the school day, making edible education a core part of the educational experience. In addition, after-school, family, and community programming are offered, including a community farmstand and regular community open days. Edible Schoolyard NYC also partners with Wellness in the Schools to bring the alternative lunch menu into the cafeteria.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Educators from NYC and beyond come to us to learn how best to implement an edible education in their own schools.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Network Schools Program brings seed-to-table education to six schools in the South Bronx and Central Brooklyn through our partnership with FoodCorps. Network Schools are in neighborhoods identified by the NYC Department of Health as having high rates of diet-related diseases and large numbers of children from low-income families. Network School communities learn to grow and manage their own edible education programs. Each school’s program is unique, based on the community’s needs, goals, and resources.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

In fall 2018, ESYNYC merged with local health and wellness organization The Bubble Foundation, bringing 14 new schools into its program. In the 2019 school year they have been adopted as ESYNYC Partner Schools, and receive support from our staff to implement edible education as best fits their unique needs. With nearly 6,000 students in the Partner Schools program spread throughout four boroughs, we see this model as a new pathway to scale our work and bring edible education to more schools across the city.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of acres of area indirectly controlled under cultivation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2010 PS 216: 18,150 sq ft; PS/MS 7 added 10k ft in 2013; Network schools: PS 109, PS 311, Evergreen MS, BK Gardens Elem. added 4620 2015-17; PS 218 adds 500 in 2018; Brighter Choice 2019 200 sq ft.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are the total number of garden, cooking class, programming event, and office volunteers we had in the school year- ie- July 2015-June 2016. Development volunteers are not included.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is how many hours were contributed by our volunteers over the course of the school year, i.e.: July 2013-June 2014.

Number of individuals applying skills learned through the organization's training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Professional Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We survey the educators who come to our PD workshops 6-12 months afterward. This is the % of follow up survey respondents that reported having used the skills and/or curricula they got from us.

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Professional Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of unique Professional Development participants we trained in our workshops over the school year (i.e.: July 2015- June 2016)

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Professional Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is how many times our free curriculum PDF has been downloaded from our website in the calendar year. During covid we launched a new webpage for lessons. 2020 amount is # unique cliques on these.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of attendees at family/community workshops/events over the course of the school year, i.e.: July 2013-June 2014. These are not unique people, some attend multiple sessions.

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of family/community events we hosted at our schools over the course of the school year, i.e.: July 2013-June 2014.

Number of facilities improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2012: PS 216 kitchen and garden; 2013-14 PS/MS 7 kitchen then garden; 2015: 4 network school gardens and kitchens; 2018 gardens and kitchens at 1 network and 3 partner schools; 2019 1 network school.

Total pounds of target crop harvested

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The amount of all the crops harvested and weighed overall at each school (excluding eggs) over the course of the school year, i.e.: July 2013-June 2014.

Total number of classes offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of garden and cooking lessons conducted during the school day in all the schools over the course of the school year, i.e.: July 2013-June 2014. This includes remote offerings during covid.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Began w/PS 216, added PS/MS 7 '13, PS 311, PS 109, MS Evergreen, and PS 55 '15. PS BK Gardens replaced PS 55 '17. Added PS 218 & 3 partner (former Bubble) schools '18. '20 no direct partner service.

Number of health outcomes improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

% of students who tried the tasting in our lessons.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

ESYNYC envisions a future where all New Yorkers are educated and empowered to make healthy food choices for themselves, their families, and their communities. The organization is working to achieve this vision through programming in Title I elementary and middle public schools in historically disadvantaged neighborhoods with high levels of diet-related diseases and little-to-no access to fresh produce, as well as through a professional development program for teachers. ESYNYC teaches experiential gardening and cooking classes in schools and offers a full range of community, family, and after-school programming. Through growing, preparing, and eating fresh, whole foods, students gain the knowledge and skills to make healthier choices, leading to better eating behaviors and, ultimately, health outcomes.

Edible Schoolyard NYC's approach is based upon proven models. Research shows that involving children in the growing and preparing of their own food can have a lasting effect on their eating habits. Students who grow and harvest their own vegetables are more likely to eat them; they also show a willingness to try new foods, which is often the first step towards developing healthier eating patterns. At a time when only 14% of American children meet their daily fruit intake and 20% meet that for vegetables, this is a critical first step. ESYNYC is dedicated to stopping the cycle of obesity and paving the way for healthier kids and communities all over New York City.

We focus on Title 1 elementary and middle Public Schools, which serve communities in diverse and historically disadvantaged neighborhoods.

Particular attention will be given to schools which:
- Are located in target neighborhoods identified by the New York City Department of Health (DPHO locations). These are areas in New York City with the highest levels of poverty and obesity, as well as areas with little to no access to fresh produce ('food deserts')
- Are led by Principals and a leadership team who express commitment to integrating an edible education for all students into their schools and are willing to allow the site to serve as a resource center for other schools.

ESYNYC has identified our niche as our ability to support low-income schools in fully utilizing garden and classroom spaces and build capacity within these schools to implement edible education programs. By integrating hands-on food education into high-need schools across New York City, ESYNYC aims to change attitudes, preferences, and behaviors around healthy eating. Staff work in schools to support garden builds and maintenance, develop and implement standards-based curriculum, and integrate garden and kitchen classes into the school day. With a goal of transforming the whole school environment, ESYNYC also conducts cafeteria tastings, works with partner organizations on improving cafeteria food, and hosts community days and family programs to involve the whole school and community in wellness education. While there are many organizations in New York City teaching kids about gardening and cooking, no other program has the integration into schools, the experiential seed-to-table approach, and the community engagement model - all backed by research - that we do. Schools have told us that often what is needed more than capital support is an extra set of hands to teach garden and kitchen classes, and with full-time staff members at school and part of the community, we provide that much-needed expert, alongside a validated, tested curricullum.

We have built a model that is effective in creating impact and a curriculum that is rigorous. A recent study found that consumption habits in the South Bronx showed no statistical change following the opening of a new fresh-foods supermarket, suggesting that providing access alone is not enough to shift preferences toward fresh, healthy foods. Clearly, the need is great for healthy food education that is joyful, thoughtful, and relies on community involvement.

Continuous feedback and improvement is part of the ESYNYC model. ESYNYC submits a comprehensive quarterly program report to its Board of Directors covering program implementation progress and outputs, and also reports quarterly to internal staff and school stakeholders on the progress against output and outcome goals. The Board of Directors is engaged and knowledgeable about our programs, goals, and progress.

Perhaps of most importance, however, is our dedicated, knowledgeable, staff who bring our curriculum to life and keep our various school communities actively engaged year-round and support our students as they learn and grow through years of our programming. Our educators come from various backgrounds and skill-sets from professional chefs to environmental science masters and together bring fun, inspiring, and rigorous programming to our 3,000+ students.

Classes have proven to be effective in changing student attitudes, preferences, and behaviors toward healthy foods. Willingness to try a new vegetable at school has increased 64% over the last 5 years. 78% of students surveyed increased their preference for vegetables after two years of our programming. In four years at Harlem, ESYNYC saw salad bar participation jump from zero to 19%, vegetable consumption rise from 14% to 41%, and fruit consumption increased from 31% to 45%. In all classes, 98% of students taste the food offered, a critical first step in developing better eating habits.

Our PD participant educator rate our workshop very highly and 99% of educators said they learned something from our professional development workshop that they would use at their own sites.


ESYNYC has also documented socio-emotional impacts. 80% of school staff reported observing students practicing working well in groups in our lessons. Said one teacher, “I love witnessing a student demonstrate mastery of skill with pride and confidence. Literacy skills are very low, so we see a lot of frustration. Getting to witness the sense of pride when they say 'I planted that,' or 'I did that,' is amazing."

Teachers tell us that special needs students often thrive in our classes. A teacher at PS 7 shared that 2 of her autistic students have learned to read a calendar by following garden & cooking reminders. “Both students do not speak very much but Andres always reminds me when he's going to cooking and comes back ready to share. This is one of the times he speaks the most."

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

EDIBLE SCHOOLYARD NYC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

EDIBLE SCHOOLYARD NYC

Board of directors
as of 09/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Jim Head


Board co-chair

Brett Williams

John Lyons

Brett Williams

Eden Werring

Amanda Fuhrman

David Maupin

Christine Muhlke

Jim Head

Mary Bernard

Alexander Smalls

Cynthia Wood

Sophie McNally

Gustavo Brillembourg

Raph Osnoss

Peter Ginsberg

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/14/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/24/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.