PLATINUM2023

DEVELOPMENTAL ENRICHMENT CENTERS

A Community of Friendship and Acceptance

Glendale, AZ   |  www.dec-az.org

Mission

Developmental Enrichment Centers endeavors to reflect God's love for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families through service, by providing a community to nurture the spiritual, emotional, and physical growth of all those we serve.

Ruling year info

2010

President & CEO

Mrs. Nancy Ruth Younger

Main address

16809 N 53rd Avenue Suite 2

Glendale, AZ 85306 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Developmental Enrichment Centers, LLC

EIN

27-1569526

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

Single Organization Support (S11)

Autism (G84)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As the parent of a child with severe medical and developmental disabilities, the founder of DEC felt called to develop and offer a supportive and enriching community for individuals like her son. An additional need she observed, was the lack of special support services within the faith community for these same individuals. To that end, Developmental Enrichment Centers was formed. A careful and detailed study of market competitors revealed a duplication of direct program services for the mild to moderately disabled adult community, while leaving the market wide open for services to the severely disabled and/or medically fragile community. Additionally, there was a noted shortage of agencies providing after school and summer program services for school age children. DEC is unique within the provider community as a faith-based organization and fills a specific niche market in the west valley.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adult Day Treatment and Training Program

Our Adult Day Program provides a caring and supportive environment for individuals with developmental disabilities and senior adults with Dementia and related disorders. Individuals are encouraged to participate in both small and large group activities that increase or reinforce daily living skills, encourage personal growth, improve socialization, and offer volunteer opportunities. Some individuals may also elect to participate in opportunities for spiritual enrichment through Bible study and musical expression.   A rich variety of weekly outings serve to support community integration

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
Adults

Our Children Afterschool and Summer programs provide specialized sensory-motor, cognitive, communicative, social, interaction and behavioral training for children with developmental disabilities. We also provide before/after hours respite services to accommodate family work schedules.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
Children and youth

All of our center based programs provide pick-up and drop off transportation service for those individuals residing at home. These fully equipped wheelchair accessible vans are also utilized for weekly outings into the community.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
Adults

Habilitation:
Provision of interventions that support developmental skills, behavior intervention, and sensory motor development and are designed to maximize the functional skills of the individual served.

 

Respite:

As part of our home based service, respite provides short-term care to relieve the un-

paid caregiver, and includes: supervision of the individual while metting thier social,

emotional and physical needs.  Services provided may consist of assistnace with

prescribed medications, providing necessary first-aid, meal preparation, and

transportation support. 

 

Attendant Care:

Assists the individual to attain or maintain safe and sanitary living conditions and/or

maintian personal cleanliness and activities of daily living.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

Private family homes which provide support to up to three adults who have a developmental disability and need some level of support. Each home is licensed through the state and given oversight and administrative support from the DEC leadership team

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Special Congressional Recognition 2022

United States Congress

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of personal development plans in place

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Every member served through our organization receives a personalized development plan that is updated quarterly as needed.

Number of adults engaging in regular physical activity

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, People with disabilities

Related Program

Adult Day Treatment and Training Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

To encourage wellness, DEC provides our members with daily activity that rotates between cardiovascular, aerobic, strength, conditioning, coordination & flexibility.

Number of children who have the ability to use eye-hand coordination, strength, and motor control to use age-appropriate tools and utensils effectively

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with disabilities

Related Program

Children After-School and Summer Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The majority of children served in our day programs lack basic social skills and the ability to properly regulate behavior. Physical limitations are not the main area of need.

Number of children able to exercise appropriate control in independent and group activities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with disabilities

Related Program

Children After-School and Summer Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2022, as a continued result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we did not provide either an afterschool program or a children's summer program. As a result, metrics are down.

Number of children who have the ability to seek help from and respond appropriately to adults

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with intellectual disabilities, People with learning disabilities

Related Program

Children After-School and Summer Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2022, as a continued result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we did not provide either an afterschool program or a children's summer program. As a result, metrics are down.

Number of adults engaging in regular recreational activity.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with disabilities, People with intellectual disabilities

Related Program

Adult Day Treatment and Training Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

A significant aspect to the adult day program is encouraging participation and daily recreational activities. Our members have a wide range of activities to choose from which encourages participation

Number of adults demonstrating the ability to exercise self-contol and appropriately interact with others.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with disabilities, People with intellectual disabilities

Related Program

Adult Day Treatment and Training Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Many of the adult members served fluctuate significantly in their ability to self-regulate and were not reflected as achieved.

Average percent achievement in annual life skill goals for members served in the adult day program.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with disabilities, People with intellectual disabilities

Related Program

Adult Day Treatment and Training Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

DEC works closely with both the member and their guardian to identity appropriate annual life skill goals leading towards greater independence.

Average annual percent achievement in life skill goals for members served in the children's after school and summer programs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with disabilities, People with intellectual disabilities

Related Program

Children After-School and Summer Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

DEC works closely with the member's family to identify appropriate annual life skill goals to increase social skills, and ultimately lead toward greater independence.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

DEC programs provide specialized sensory-motor, cognitive, and communicative development, as well as social interaction and behavioral training. Personalized goals and skill sets are developed and expanded upon by activities, classes, and community outings. For our young clients, we also provide center based respite services that accommodate early release and special school holidays. Our experienced staff support each client's individual growth and goals in a safe and loving environment, working in close coordination with the primary caregiver. The Adult Day Program (DTA) serves aged 18 years and above, with specialized programming for senior adults over the age of 65. Our Afterschool and Summer Programs (DTT/DTS) are designed for children aged 7 through 17.

The DTA focuses on meaningful social/recreational activities to improve self-esteem, self-advocacy, self-care, and community integration activities; with a strong emphasis on creative expression through the arts for adults with severely challenging disabilities. DEC also provides activities specifically designed for the frail elderly including adult education classes, music, and support groups for participants and care providers. Our DTT and DTS programs provide specialized sensory-motor, cognitive, communication, social interaction, and behavioral training for children with developmental disabilities. We also provide center based respite services to accommodate early release and special school holidays. All of our center-based programs provide pickup and drop-off transportation services for those individuals residing in the family home. These fully equipped, wheelchair-accessible vans are also utilized for weekly outings into the community.

In addition to our center-based programs, DEC offers in-home care services of habilitation, attendant care, and respite (which provides relief to primary caregivers). These services are provided on a prescheduled basis throughout the week and on weekends as needed. The focus of all of services is to enhance the personal life skills of each individual and provide opportunities to explore pre-vocational training, with essential emphasis on training in self-advocacy, social integration, and greater independence with personal care needs. We offer opportunities for individuals to explore new interests and rekindle former hobbies all in a caring and supportive program, home, and/or community environments.

The ultimate goal of our programs and home care based services is to help all individuals reach their highest potential and personal independence.

During a client's annual Individual Service Plan (ISP) meeting, new outcomes (or goals) are discussed and agreed upon by the client, guardian/family, group home manager, (if applicable), the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) Support Coordinator, and DEC management. These outcomes are then outlined in the current ISP document and individual outcome data collection sheets are created. Each Outcomes Sheet states the ISP outcome, proposed teaching methods, and developmental area addressed by the specific outcome (safety, social skills, communication skills, etc.).

Clients are placed in groups accordingly to age, cognitive development, and interests. Each group moves throughout the facility based on a highly structured schedule that provides time for both large and small group activities, personal choice, lunch, and personal care. A team of skilled staff are assigned to work with each client group providing any and all support and care required.

Participation in small and large group activities allow each client to develop individual outcomes and skills and provide personal enrichment. Small group activities focus on more personalized outcome areas such as sensory processing, social etiquette, communication, self-help, conversation; and cognitive development. Large group activities such as physical or adaptive recreation can help a client achieve their social skills outcome through interaction with a more diverse group of peers. Community outings provided an opportunity to practice safety awareness and compliance, and enhance social skills. Staff utilize a combination of modeling, hand over hand, lecturing, and verbal redirection to accomplish teaching objectives. The majority of client outcomes focus on four key areas: communication skills, social skills, health and hygiene, personal safety.

The DEC training facility currently provides over 9600 sq. ft. of diverse programing room. Each area is designed to create a warm homelike environment while providing appropriate resources to address the individual needs of the clients served. The present location is equipped to serve up to 70 clients (children & adults in separate areas) and 30 staff. Regular day program services are enhanced by the fully equipped handicap-accessible kitchen, indoor recreation space, and adjacent shaded lawn areas to allow for recreational games. The facility is also designed to meet the needs of the medically fragile disabled with related equipment and supplies to ensure safety and well-being. Ample parking with specifically identified handicap parking provides ease of access and safety when loading and unloading client transport vehicles.

Developmental Enrichment Centers desires to partner with individuals that share our vision and take seriously the importance of offering skilled and compassionate care while encouraging our clients to grow and develop to their highest potential. With a mission founded upon the God- given belief that every person is a person of worth and dignity, we seek individuals who recognize the unique abilities of every individual and the versatility required to find just the right approach that will bring out the amazing potential waiting to be discovered in each one.

The administration of DEC consists of individuals committed to the long range vision of DEC and accepting their role as “ministers called to serve". Specific functions include serving as educators, champions, and motivators to all our customers; whether clients, their family, community members, or fellow staff. Administrative staffing needs address financial management, human resources, and marketing. Many of the positions require cross training and job sharing minimizing administrative overhead expense. Additional positions are filled as need is identified.

The Direct Care Provider staff are committed para-professionals who proudly maintain the highest level of care giver training and certification. Candidates for the role of DSP come from numerous walks of life, including: college nursing programs, behavioral health, special education, recreational and music therapy, and even homemakers. We also provide opportunity for young adults exploring various career paths to intern or work as program aides, learning first-hand the rewards of working with the disabled.

Based on strict licensing guidelines, the direct care workforce must adhere to specific client to staff ratios. We maintain a minimum of one staff for every four clients in the day program setting. However, a number of the clients served require more extensive levels of care which can increase care to a direct one-to-one ratio. In-home services are always provided at a one-to-one ratio.

DEC experienced a better than anticipated enrollment increase for both DTA and DTT programs and corresponding adult TRA services. The majority of new clients were the result of referral from both DDD Support Coordination, families and care providers. Others indicated interest as the result of our improved website presence. While actual enrollment numbers for 2016 increased, the number of billable units was significantly below projection. This was primarily due to the higher percentage of absences tied directly the high percentage of severely medically challenged clients. Another contributing factor was the inconsistency in arrival and drop-off times for individuals residing in state funded housing. DEC management addressed the issue with leadership of the other agencies, but saw little effort to correct the problem. State regulations prohibited billing for lost hours, while requiring agency to fully staff in anticipation of client arrival. To compensate, assigned direct care staff were sent home early and methods were employed to significantly reduce overhead expenses.

Day program clients successfully mastered 26% of their identified goals. During the previous year, ISP teams placed great emphasis on designing and establishing goals that offered the client greater challenge. However, based on results, it would appear expectations were set far above reasonable achievement. The Operations Manager will be challenged to address the performance expectation of each goal during the annual ISP meeting to resolve the problem. All goals should be written in a manner that allows for potential achievement within a yearly timeframe. In addition, the number of individual goals is excessive and should be reduced to no more than five goals per client. As an example, many of the children attending the summer program had an average of six (6) goals. With only 8 weeks to address goals, it was highly unlikely total success would be achieved. Counseling with the family and support coordination regarding this issue, prior to enrollment would be strongly advised.

The majority of home care client goals focus on personal hygiene and social skills. However, this year functional/self-help skills in motor movement and sensory processing were added significantly. Most progress was achieved in functional/self-help skills of motor movement, i.e. learning how to manipulate objects like a toothbrush. Other added goals were designed to assist with sensory processing by providing opportunities for exposure to crowds and load noises while in the community. Families were further encouraged to reinforce individual client goals between visits by the trained DEC provider, although some clients were more apt to respond positively to the DEC provider. During quarterly home visits, the majority of the families expressed satisfaction with their providers and felt satisfactory progress was achieved with the client's individual goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

DEVELOPMENTAL ENRICHMENT CENTERS
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

DEVELOPMENTAL ENRICHMENT CENTERS

Board of directors
as of 10/23/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Stephen Younger

Desert Sky Engineering

Term: 2014 - 2017

Stephen Younger

Developmental Enrichment Centers

Bryan Younger

Developmental Enrichment Centers

Nancy Younger

Developmental Enrichment Centers

Jeff Nagy

Nile Graphics

Theresa Kresge

No Affiliation

Mary Kay Rewald

Unexpected Treasures

Scott Eveland

Paper Machinery Corp

Joan Eveland

Eveland Properties

Lorane Coats

No Affiliation

Ernest LaMertha, ThD

Banner Health

Chris Caspers

Nile Graphics

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/18/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.