HORSE HERITAGE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

Valley, WA   |  www.horseheritage.org

Mission

Enhancing the lives of youth and families through the use of horses, community and nature while teaching confidence, responsibility, and respect.

Ruling year info

2012

Director

Elissa Wellhausen

Main address

P.O. Box 48

Valley, WA 99181 USA

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EIN

27-1806905

NTEE code info

Agricultural, Youth Development (O52)

Patient Services - Entertainment, Recreation (E86)

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Life is hard and humans are faced with stresses and lifestyles that are not conducive to health. At horse heritage our goal is to increase quality of life for all of our participants and volunteers and that starts with better health. Working with horses is a multifaceted activity that has benefits for participants in many ways. Studies conducted by Washington State University and the National Institute of Health have shown that there is a large magnetic field surrounding the horse due to his large heart size. When humans are within this field, their heart rate decreases, blood pressure reduces and there is a significant decrease in the stress hormone, cortisol. Benefits of being with horses last beyond the time in direct contact and continue throughout the day. Children with higher base levels of cortisol are considered potentially at risk for development of psychopathology.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Therapeutic Horseback Riding

Therapeutic riding uses equine-assisted activities to achieve psychological and educational goals for people with physical, mental and psychologicalimpairments as well as provide the individual with skills in the sport of riding. The emphasis is to incorporate cognitive, behavioral, psychological and physical goals into the program plan while teaching adapted riding. The horse is a strong motivator for accomplishing these goals. People with physical, mental and psychological impairments may use equine activities, adapted as needed, as a recreation and leisure experience. The emphasis is on an enjoyable and relaxing experience that provides additional therapeutic benefits in the area of socialization, posture, mobility, and an overall improved quality of life. Individuals may participate in horse-related activities to their maximumability in an atmosphere of support, structure and socialization for the primary purpose of the intrinsic enjoyment of the activity.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with disabilities

Horses act as both teachers and friends for their riders. Involvement with these magnificent creatures has proven to be a catalyst to help students learn about themselves and others and to foster relationships and bonding. Communication and problem solving are key to being a successful rider. Riders work through fear and develop confidence as they worktoward their goals and strive for victories. Experiencing the natural high of their achievement will lead riders to look for this natural high in other areas oftheir life, leading them away from negative influences.  Equine-facilitated learning (EFL) experiences are carefully created equine-assisted activities that promote human development. EFL is an experiential approach to personal growth and learning. Experiential learning refers to a style of learning often described as “learning by doing” that occurs when a person is interacting with their environment. Participants commonly experience improvements in mentaland physical health while learning about horses and themselves, and building skills that are carried into their lives. EFL is therapeutic by adding emotional and cognitive aspects of helping the whole person in a multi-dimensional way.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
People with disabilities

Equine-assisted therapy (EAT) is treatment that incorporates equine activities with rehabilitative goals related to the patient’s needs. A physical, occupational or speech therapy treatment strategy that utilizes the movement of the horse to address impairments, functional limitations and disabilities in patients with neuromotor and sensory dysfunction, hippotherapy is effectivein improving the quality of life for individuals with disabilities.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Where we work

Accreditations

North American Riding for the Handicapped Association - Accreditation 2011

Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International 2015

Affiliations & memberships

Horse Powered Reading 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of riders served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens, People with disabilities, Families

Related Program

Therapeutic Horseback Riding

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Documenting the number of riders that participate in our Adapted Horseback Riding program.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Families

Related Program

Therapeutic Horseback Riding

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Documenting the hours that are volunteered during sessions that directly benefits the riders that are being served within the program.

Number of Riders

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Preteens, Adolescents, People with disabilities

Related Program

Equine Assisted Learning Workshops

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Documenting the number of riders that participate in our Equine Assisted Learning programs

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Horse Heritage is a community based organization that provides a positive outlet for people interested in horse, environmental, and leadership related activities. Our vision is to become a year round program offering therapeutic riding, hippotherapy, and equine facilitate learning to members of our community.

Every portion of our community will be invited to participate in activities and programs offered by Horse Heritage. We will target youth 5-15 years of age and special needs individuals. Participation in Horse Heritage is not limited to the above groups. By encouraging the entire community to become involved through partnership and civic engagement, we are strengthening bonds within the community and creating mutually beneficial relationships with other community groups.

Horse Heritage is in a unique position to ensure the safety of our participants by using good horses to create a great experience. All of our animals go through a rigorous screening process which allows us to see how they react to stress. With this knowledge we are able to customize our training program for each horse and help them overcome their fears and relax during stressful situations. By changing a horse's environment, they stay interested in their jobs, and look forward to new challenges.

Every year we have seen between 10-40% increase in participation from the previous year. However our impact is more personal to each individual, which is where we are able to chart the most drastic growth. Our participants report significant increases in personal development, physical capabilities and emotional stability.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Horse Heritage serves youth and families. Our main focus is on personal development of all individuals.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have altered our available lesson times to coincide with times that parents and caregivers would like to participate. Due to the scheduling of family vacations and events, our surveys indicated that parents would like to change the available riding times to during the week rather than on Fridays.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It keeps our minds open to other possibilities of serving our riders.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people,

Financials

HORSE HERITAGE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HORSE HERITAGE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

Board of directors
as of 3/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ryan Wellhausen

Ryan Wellhausen

Linda McCanna

Melissa Scott

Heather Hulett

Susan England

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/14/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/14/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.