Elephant Aid International

One World, One Elephant At A Time

aka Elephant Refuge North America   |   Attapulgus, GA   |  www.elephantaidinternational.org

Mission

Elephant Aid International (EAI)’s mission is to end the worldwide suffering of elephants by creating innovative approaches to the care and management of elephants in captivity. EAI gives hands-on assistance to improve standards of care; teaches humane methods of training and handling; raises public awareness of the lives and needs of elephants; models new standards of care at its Elephant Refuge North America, where elephants can retire, recover and thrive.

Ruling year info

2011

Founder and CEO

Carol Buckley

Main address

PO Box 283

Attapulgus, GA 39815 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

International Elephant Aid

EIN

27-2243265

NTEE code info

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Elephants suffer from the moment they are captured from the wild and in the case of captive born, when they take their first breath. Providing a suitable environment for this mega vertebrate in a captive setting has proven to be a challenge near impossible to meet. In our effort to make captive life humane for elephants EAI is helping to change how the public relates to elephants; how elephant owners view their elephants; how mahouts (elephant handlers) and elephant caregivers train elephants; and how captive elephants are cared for worldwide. By providing education and hands-on assistance, EAI is working to end the worldwide suffering of elephants…one elephant at a time.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Chain Free Elephant Corral - Pilot Project

In 2013 eight-year-old, Sweetie Kali, captive born at the National Trust for Nature Conservation's Biodiversity Conservation Center, Sauraha, Nepal, was the first recipient of our chain-free corral project; a first of its kind in Asia. This never before considered option allows Sweetie Kali to permanently shed the leg chains she has worn since she was a baby. The project proved successful. Experiencing autonomy in the form of physical freedom and self determination resulted in the extinguishing of the stress induced stereotypical behavior that she engaged in every hour of the day. The project also enabled us to begin mahout (elephant keeper) training, teaching the mahouts a kinder, gentler, more humane form of elephant management.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

Following the grand success of our chain-free pilot program at National Trust for Nature Conservation, Chitwan, Nepal, EAI responded to a request from the Nepali government to create solar powered chain free corrals for all of their 64 working elephants. making Nepal government the first in Asia to go chain-free for captive elephants. Our goal to create chain-free corrals for all of the governments captive-held elephants who live and work in Nepal was realized in 2015 when EAI, working collaboratively with Nepal's Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation, build multi-acre solar powered electric fence corrals to replace the tradition of chaining an elephants' legs to a stout wooded post in the ground. By erecting chain-free corrals (power fencing) we are able to safely and securely contain elephants without the need to chain. Over the next several years we built the first chain free corrals at The Elephant Hospital and Boon Lott's Elephant Sanctuary in Thailand; At the Bannerghatta Biological Park in India; And at Tiger Tops Elephant Camp in Nepal. In conjunction with the Chain Free Corral project we trained mahouts in Compassionate Elephant Care, a system that utilizes the understanding of elephant biology, psychology and culture in managing elephants to ensure their welfare. Additionally we have consulted with the governemnt of Sri Lanka to redesign both the elephant orphanage and the zoo in order to improve elephant welfare.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

Over the past decade we have provided free, bi-annual elephant foot care and training for mahouts, owners, veterinarians and vet techs for over 300 captive-held elephants and they carers in Nepal, Thailand, India, Vietnam and Indonesia. We provide foot trimming services, teach foot trimming skills, oversee the development of in-house foot care programs, offer remote foot trimming and train elephant caregivers in foot health evaluation, provide foot care to promote overall health and prevent the onset of osteomyelitis, and provide the tools and equipment needed to maintain proper foot health.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Adults

Employ a wildlife veterinarian in Sauraha, Chitwan National Park, Nepal, to monitor elephant foot health and provide scientific data to address the issues that led to poor foot health, lameness and the development of osteomyilitis in captive-held elephants.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Academics

provide an opportunity for the community to become involved in the preparation of Elephant Refuge North America in the US; help to erect chain free corrals in Asia; and to learn foot trimming skills to benefit captive-held elephants in Asia.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Caregivers

A certified program for elephant foot care including classroom and practical requirements resulting in certification.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

An 850 natural-habitat refuge for retired captive-held elephants, providing an atmosphere of autonomy, community with compatible elephants, a non breeding, non exhibit, non commercial use facility.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Students

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries Provisional Certification 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal clinics/shelters improved as a direct result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Elephant Foot Care Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

EAI provides direct support to 37 shelters of privately owned shelters and 9 government owned shelters for captive-held elephants.

Number of captive animals released

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Elephant Foot Care Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Captive-held elephants are not allowed to be released into the wild. These elephants are provided with bi-annual pedicures, food and their carers trained in compassionate care, health and nutrition.

Number of animals with freedom from discomfort

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Elephant Foot Care Project

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

we provide hands on assistance with food, foot care, pedicures, mahout training, facility design, behavior evaluation and rehabilitation to improve captive held elephants lives.

Number of animals with freedom from pain

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Elephant Foot Care Project

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

all of these elephant experience reduced levels of pain due to mahout education, improved diet, foot care, and in some cases retirement.

Number of animals with freedom to express normal behavior

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Elephant Foot Care Project

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All of the elephants are free to express normal behavior for a few hours each day, some more than others because they remain captive-held.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

EAI aims to educate the public in an effort to raise human consciousness regarding elephants and the negative impact captive life has on them. We are engaged in multiple project aimed at helping elephant experience less suffering and more autonomy in their day to day life.

Our strategies include education programs for mahouts and elephant caregiver (https://elephantaidinternational.org/projects/mahout-elephant-training-initiative/); foot trimming programs (https://elephantaidinternational.org/projects/elephant-foot-care/) to benefit elephants worldwide; chain free corral construction (https://elephantaidinternational.org/projects/chain-free-means-pain-free/) to change the brutal practice of chaining elephants to contain them; volunteer programs (https://elephantaidinternational.org/support/volunteer-opportunities/) to educate the public about elephants and how we can better serve them.

EAI has provided theses services and engaged in our programs for a decade with great success. Creating Asia's first chain free corral; followed by collaboration with Nepal's Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation to create chain free corrals for all of the governments 64 elephants; Our volunteer programs have assisted in building chain free corrals in Nepal and Thailand; Our foot care workshops attracted people from around the world and include mahouts from Nepal, India and Thailand.

To date EAI has freed 117 elephants from a life in chains by building solar powered chain free corrals in Southeast Asia. These corrals are design for installation in the remotest of locations, where National Park anti poaching patrol elephants live and work. Additionally EAI has conducted foot trimming workshops and provided pedicures for elephants across Asia, servicing hundreds of elephants on a bi-annual basis. Our Mahout training program has provided education and training to more than 500 traditional mahouts who otherwise would never be exposed to a more humane approach to elephant training and management. Our volunteer program continues to educate hundreds each year, in Asia and the US, about the plight of captive-held elephants.

Benefiting from what has been learned about captive elephant care over the past several decades we have created Elephant Refuge North America, in Attapulgus GA.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

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  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Elephant Aid International
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Elephant Aid International

Board of directors
as of 2/10/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Leslie Schreiber

NA

Term: 2011 -

A. Christy Williams

World Wildlife Fund

Leslie Schreiber

NA

Carol Buckley

Elephant Aid International

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data