Educational Institutions

HINDU CHARITIES FOR AMERICA

Give in spirit of "Live Here, Give Here"

aka HC4A

Cedar Park, TX

Mission

HC4A mission is: " Bridge Income Disparity Through Education". To this end, HC4A has two programs: 1. Annual donation of school supplies homeless children (join project with ShalomAustin) in Austin, TX 2. Vocational training scholarships for those living below poverty line in Austin TX and now in Los Angeles, CA. The school supply program helps shift some of the financial burden from the parents experiencing homelessness. The vocational scholarships is key to leading to jobs that pay at or above living wages. Vocational training takes 6 mos. to 24 mos., cost at fraction of degree courses. Students learn hands on skills. With these skills, those students with entrepreneurial spirit can even start a business!

Ruling Year

2010

President

Harish Kotecha

Director of Scholarships

Dinesh Vakharia

Main Address

c/o Kotecha 3803 Winchester Dr.

Cedar Park, TX 78613 USA

Keywords

donation of school supplies, scholarship awards, vocational scholarship awards

EIN

27-2362869

 Number

7963552732

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (B12)

Vocational Rehabilitation (includes Job Training and Employment for Disabled and Elderly) (J30)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

The income disparity in the USA is getting wider. We have 40 million or so Americans live in poverty. Hindu Charities for America (HC4A) aims to help bring this population out of poverty. HC4A annually provides basic supplies for children experiencing homelessness. Additionally, HC4A provides vocational training scholarships to those high school graduates and adults. These scholarships will help them to get better paying jobs and raise a family that they can in turn help educate.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

1 4 8 10 17

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

School Supplies Project

Vocational Training Tuition Scholarships

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of homeless students served with school supplies

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

K-12 (5-19 years)

Related program

School Supplies Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

The quantity of school supplies per child has increased. In reality, the dollar amount has been in rise since we started this program.

Number of scholarships awarded to economically disadvantaged students ($500 or $1000)

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Vocational Training Tuition Scholarships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

The scholarships have been in denomination of $500 or $1,00 upto 2018. Thereafter, we the amount has been increased to minimum of $1,000 per semester. In some cases it has been $2,000.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

We hope that the financial burden on the families experiencing homelessness is reduces with schooling needs. Secondly, the vocational scholarships will help high school graduates and adults get training in relatively short time and jobs that pay better than living wages. This will enable the families to also educate their children as they grow up since they have experienced the value of educaiton.

We have developed four prong approach: 1. Effective governance 2. Identification of the population to serve and their needs 3. Funder and donor development 4. Fundraising and execution of events For each, some plans are in place and others are being developed now that we have crossed 10 years of 100x growth. To take it forward so we can be more impactful, we are looking at more meaningful programs where there is a void, partnering with organizations who are willing to change.

Having served for over 10 years, we have non-paid board and volunteers who help with various functions required to raise the funds and execute the programs. We have now built a reputation and have chapters in various cities. Our donor base has increased and also, we are developing programs that will attract corporate grants and sponsors.

We measure our success based on: 1. Filling needs where there are voids 2. Working with organizations who we provide scholarship and getting reports on how their earning have increased.

We have served over 10,000 children experiencing homelessness and provided over 440 scholarships. One organization reports: Graduates and Career Placement: Capital IDEA students achieve significantly higher earnings upon graduation and placement then when they first enter the program. Hindu Charities has supported 39 graduates since 2014, 73% of whom are Registered Nurses; these graduates are earning an average of $24.04 an hour, or $50,003 annually. Compared to average annual earnings of $12,813 at program entry for the same students, this represents an increase of nearly 300%. Graduates have started careers locally with employers such as Ascension Seton, St. David’s HealthCare, Regency Integrated Healthcare, State of Texas, MGA Homecare, Veracyte, Texas Lottery Commission, Austin Independent School District, and Pflugerville Independent School District.

External Reviews

Awards

Outstanding Community Charity 2018

Greater Austin Asian American Chamber of Commerce

Photos

Financials

HINDU CHARITIES FOR AMERICA

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2015
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2015
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Not Applicable

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Not Applicable

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/24/2020

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender Identity
Male
Sexual Orientation
Decline to state
Disability Status
Decline to state

Race & Ethnicity

No data

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 06/24/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Policies and processes

done
We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
done
We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
done
We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
done
We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
done
We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
done
We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.