NO MORE EMPTY POTS

We fight poverty.

aka No More Empty Pots   |   Omaha, NE   |  www.nmepomaha.org

Mission

No More Empty Pots' mission is to serve as a conduit connecting individuals and groups to improve self-sufficiency of people and economic resilience of local urban and rural communities through advocacy and action. No More Empty Pots' vision is to support communities in becoming self-sufficient and food secure through collaboration and adhering to our core values.

Our core values are:
Education: Consumers, Producers and Our Youth
Stewardship: Land Use and Community Resources
Sustainability: Triple Bottom Line - People, Planet, Profit

Ruling year info

2010

President/CEO

Nancy Williams

Main address

8511 North 30th ST

Omaha, NE 68112 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-2427728

NTEE code info

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the Landscape Report, 9% of individuals living in the Omaha-Council Bluffs metro area live in food deserts, compared to 4% nationwide. This is especially prevalent in northeast Omaha, where there is a high concentration of poverty and high unemployment rate. Those living in poverty are three times more likely to be unable to access fresh, affordable food than higher income areas. North Omaha has a high concentration of African Americans, who are 23% more likely to be obese and 72% more likely to have diabetes than their Caucasian counterparts. (https://familiesusa.org/product/african-american-health-disparities-compared-to-non-hispanic-whites). These health disparities are paralleled when comparing African American and Caucasian youth. African American children are 56% more likely to be obese. Access to fresh, nutritious produce as well as nutritional, culinary, and gardening education provide the opportunity to combat and prevent diet-related health conditions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Collaborative Community Centered Food Hub

The Collaborative Community Centered Food Hub is a part of an overall vision for food aggregation, entrepreneurship and training hub that connects multiple sectors of the food system. This project addresses the needs of the most vulnerable community residents: 1) Creating employment opportunities; 2) Filling gaps in the food system and employabe skills development; and 3) Connecting people and resources to an integrated food system. Hub activities will generate recurring revenue.

Population(s) Served

This program improves community food-related knowledge and self-sufficiency by providing healthy prepared meals, fresh local produce, and educational resources and activities. The program reduces food waste and expands markets for local producers by transforming gleaned and rescued food into meals and purchasing local produce from farmers.

Population(s) Served

No More Empty Pots 15-week Culinary Workforce Training Program prepares individuals to enter the workplace as a well-rounded employee and equips them with skills to succeed in a career in the food and beverage industry. Students will develop job and culinary skills while supporting the local economy and combating food waste.

Population(s) Served

Hands-on food nutrition, growing and cooking education programming using local, seasonal and affordable foods while integrating STEAM components (science, technology, engineering, art, and math).

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Chamber of Commerce 2016

Nonprofit Association of the Midlands (NAM) 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Collaborative Community Centered Food Hub

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of youth, adults and seniors served in program activities

Number of jobs created and maintained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Collaborative Community Centered Food Hub

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Included full time, part-time and 1099 contractors for all programs and services in organization

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Hands-on food nutrition, growing and cooking education programming using local, seasonal and affordable foods while integrating STEAM components (science, technology, engineering, art, and math).

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

NMEP serves as a catalyst for identifying individuals and groups to address challenges to improve self-sufficiency in urban and rural communities. Accomplishing those goals will move us closer to fulfilling our overall desire to link local and regional individuals and groups working to promote local sustainable business and improve self-sufficiency.

Goal 1: Transition to a more traditional organizational structure and build Food Hub to expand organizational capacity and respond to growing numbers of community requests for support for local food and sustainable urban ag education projects.

Goal 2: To engage in collective impact initiatives with diverse individuals and groups, for profit and nonprofit, that supports our mission of developing self-sufficient, economically resilient communities through expansion of food system educational, training and business development programs.

Goal 3: To fundraise for and renovate structures for food hub construction as NMEP continues to seek out cooperative opportunities for providing intergenerational, hands-on, applied STEM educational activities with a focus on food.

No More Empty Pots develops and delivers inter-generational programs in food access, nutrition education, workforce readiness and business development. With positive outcomes over the past three years and the completion of the kids kitchen, NMEP is expanding its youth program activities with components in food production, career exploration, technology integration and food preparation. Healthy local food access and education programs include local fresh food distribution, cooking demonstrations, and community garden development with collaborating organizations.

1. Develop collaborative partnerships that deliver effective results
2. Maximize resources by analyzing data and determining best course of action
3. Engage community stakeholders in activities that address systemic root causes of poverty on families, youth and seniors through education, training, finance, and business development while building leadership capacity of residents and communities

NMEP continues to expand collaborative education opportunities with partnering organizations in for profit, nonprofit and governmental sectors. From leading youth and sustainable gardening and healthy eating education for area urban youth to launching the intergenerational projects in a newly renovated food hub. With NMEP there is a mutually beneficial relationship that positively impacts the desired long term community educational and self-sufficiency outcomes.

In addition No More Empty Pots' leadership team is comprised of professionals, many with graduate degrees, with over 100 years combined experience in food systems, agriculture, recycling, youth development, training and professional development, project management, technology, and education.

Goal 1: Capacity building: Organized program activities into two major areas based on data and stakeholder feedback: community education and culinary operations then hired director of culinary operations to provide management for culinary operations; CEO completed intensive leadership training series and incorporated training into staff development; reorganized staff to support program restructuring; enhanced staff development plans with specific funding allocation per staff member. The organization and staff were recognized for eight leadership and community awards in 2018.

Goal 2: Expand community engagement: increased number of staff engaged in collaborative community projects engaged in food systems and poverty alleviation including United Way of the Midlands, Douglas County Health Department, Center for Rural Affairs, Center for Holistic Development, First National Bank, Heartland Family Service, Nebraska Enterprise Fund, Empowerment Network, NorthStar Foundation and MAPA; engaged four interns and three service-learning classes from three post-secondary educational institutions.

Goal 3: Food Hub Construction – completed renovation of two hundred year old buildings into food hub with a $4M capital campaign; adapting and integrating existing programs to fill program service needs in the food hub after construction; engaging partners in planning services and activities for multiple community stakeholder groups; securing funding to complete construction.

Financials

NO MORE EMPTY POTS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

NO MORE EMPTY POTS

Board of directors
as of 3/13/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jennifer Katz

Edgar Hicks

CFO Systems, LLC

Donna Polk

Nebraska Urban Indian Health Coalition

Jennifer Katz

Midland University

Carolyn Anderson

Community Volunteer

Elizabeth Sarno

Organic Farmer

Anthony Cerasoli

First National Bank

Marilyn Ross

Community Volunteer

Maria Malnack

NorthStar Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes