PLATINUM2024

Oregon TRIO Association

Promoting educational equity, access, and opportunity for underrepresented students since 2000

Astoria, OR   |  https://oregontrio.org/

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Mission

Oregon TRIO Association’s mission is to grow and support TRIO programs, staff, and students.

Ruling year info

2011

Executive Director

Mr. Matt Bisek

Main address

1651 Lexington Ave

Astoria, OR 97103 USA

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EIN

27-2616442

NTEE code info

Music Groups, Bands, Ensembles (A6C)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Oregon's significant challenge is education equity. Although 91.5% of Oregonians have graduated high school as per American Community Survey data (2023), only 35% have a post-high school degree. It's worse for marginalized students, with National Center for Education Statistics reporting in 2023 that merely 15.2% of low-income students finish a 4-year degree within 8 years of high school graduation. With 11.2% of Oregonians living below the poverty line (U.S. Census Bureau), exceeding the national average, adverse financial circumstances limit higher education access for students, especially those identifying as BIPOC, parenting, non-cisgender, former foster youth, disabled, and first-generation. OTA and Oregon TRIO programs combat these disparities, providing academic tutoring, career guidance, financial education, and mental health counseling to empower disadvantaged students in their educational journey.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Educational Talent Search

The Educational Talent Search (ETS) program identifies and assists individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds who have the potential to succeed in higher education. ETS provides academic, career, and financial counseling to its participants and encourages them to graduate from high school and continue completing their postsecondary education. ETS publicizes the availability of financial aid and assists participants in the postsecondary education application process. ETS also encourages persons who have not completed education programs at the secondary or postsecondary level to enter or reenter and complete postsecondary education.

The goal of ETS is to increase the number of youths from disadvantaged backgrounds who complete high school to enroll in and complete their postsecondary education. OTA Talent Search projects work with 5845 students ranging from 6th through 12th grade.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Young adults
Preteens
Adolescents
Economically disadvantaged people

Upward Bound provides fundamental support to participants in their preparation for college entrance. The program provides opportunities for participants to succeed in their precollege performance and ultimately in their higher education pursuits. Upward Bound serves: high school students from low-income families; and high school students from families in which neither parent holds a bachelor's degree. The goal of Upward Bound is to increase the rate at which participants complete secondary education and enroll in and graduate from institutions of postsecondary education.

Upward Bound projects provide academic instruction in mathematics, laboratory sciences, composition, literature, and foreign languages. Tutoring, counseling, mentoring, cultural enrichment, work-study programs, education or counseling services designed to improve the financial and economic literacy of students.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
People with disabilities
Young adults

The Upward Bound Math and Science program is designed to strengthen the math and science skills of participating students. The goal of the program is to help students recognize and develop their potential to excel in math and science and to encourage them to pursue postsecondary degrees in math and science, and ultimately careers in the math and science profession.

Program services include: summer programs with intensive math and science training; year-round counseling and advisement; exposure to university faculty members who do research in mathematics and the sciences; computer training; and participant-conducted scientific research under the guidance of faculty members or graduate students, who are serving as mentors; education or counseling services designed to improve the financial and economic literacy of students.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Ethnic and racial groups
Young adults

Veterans Upward Bound is designed to motivate and assist veterans in the development of academic and other requisite skills necessary for acceptance and success in a program of postsecondary education. The program provides assessment and enhancement of basic skills through counseling, mentoring, tutoring and academic instruction in the core subject areas. The primary goal of the program is to increase the rate at which participants enroll in and complete postsecondary education programs.

All Veterans Upward Bound projects must provide instruction in mathematics through pre-calculus, laboratory science, foreign language, composition and literature. Projects may also provide short-term remedial or refresher courses for veterans who are high school graduates but have delayed pursuing postsecondary education. Projects are also expected to assist veterans in securing support services from other locally available resources.

Population(s) Served
Veterans

Student Support Services (SSS) provides opportunities for academic development, assists students with basic college requirements, and motivates students toward the successful completion of their postsecondary education. SSS projects also may provide grant aid to current SSS participants who are receiving Federal Pell Grants. The goal of SSS is to increase the college retention and graduation rates of its participants.

All SSS projects must provide: academic tutoring, which may include instruction in reading, writing, study skills, mathematics, science, and other subjects; advice and assistance in postsecondary course selection, assist student with information on both the full range of student financial aid programs, benefits and resources for locating public and private scholarships; and assistance in completing financial aid applications.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities

The Educational Opportunity Centers program provides counseling and information on college admissions to qualified adults who want to enter or continue a program of postsecondary education. The program also provides services to improve the financial and economic literacy of participants. An important objective of the program is to counsel participants on financial aid options, including basic financial planning skills, and to assist in the application process. The goal of the EOC program is to increase the number of adult participants who enroll in postsecondary education institutions.

Projects include: academic advice, personal counseling, and career workshops; information on postsecondary education opportunities and student financial assistance; help in completing applications for college admissions, testing, and financial aid; coordination with nearby postsecondary institutions; media activities designed to involve and acquaint the community with higher education opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities
Economically disadvantaged people

The McNair program prepares eligible participants for doctoral studies through involvement in research and other scholarly activities. Participants are from disadvantaged backgrounds and have demonstrated strong academic potential. Academic institutions work closely with participants as they complete their undergraduate requirements and encourage participants to enroll in graduate programs while tracking their progress through the successful completion of advanced degrees.

The goal of the McNair program is to increase the attainment of Ph.D. degrees by students from underrepresented segments of society. All McNair projects must provide the following activities: opportunities for research or other scholarly activities; summer internships; seminars and other educational activities designed to prepare students for doctoral study; tutoring; academic counseling; and activities designed to assist students participating in the project in securing admission to and financial assistance.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Students

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Academics

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

TRIO programs throughout Oregon pay a membership fee to Oregon TRIO Association to receive our services.

Number of conferences held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Academics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Oregon TRIO Association aims to hold annual professional development conferences for TRIO professionals and a yearly student conference for our TRIO students.

Number of conference attendees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Academics, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Academics, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of TRIO professionals or stakeholders who is on our email list.

Number of meetings with policymakers or candidates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Academics, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Lobbying on behalf of TRIO programs for continued support with our federal legislatures. We schedule yearly meetings with our 2 senators & 5 house reps to advocate for TRIO and our students.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Academics, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Grant Writing workshops to assist institutions in writing competitive proposals to get a new or keep an existing TRIO program in Oregon.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Academics, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Addressing an Essential Need: The Role of TRIO
In Oregon, visualize a community where every student, regardless of their socio-economic background, has equal access to quality education. At the Oregon TRIO Association (OTA), we believe that this ideal scenario should be our reality. Regrettably, for numerous students from underrepresented and low-income communities, the journey towards a higher education is often obscured by systemic and unfair barriers that require significant resources to overcome.

Recently, changing economic environments have unearthed these deeply-rooted challenges, making the path to college education and prosperous future uncertain for many of our students. Acknowledging these difficulties, OTA aims to make a strategic intervention with our TRIO programs. Through these unique initiatives, we provide comprehensive academic and career support specifically designed to help low-income, first-generation students, those residing in rural areas, BIPOC students, and students with disabilities.

A Strategy Built on Hope and Determination
We don't just believe in their dreams; we are committed to making them happen. We have mapped out three vital SMART goals that will expand our reach, amplify our impact, and create a higher success ratio among our TRIO program participants.

Our first goal is ambitious but achievable - to extend the reach of our TRIO programs, amplifying student enrollment by 20% over the next three years. We aim to do this by forging partnerships with five additional schools across diverse regions of Oregon. With these collaborations, we hope to shift the narrative and arm these students with the tools they need to carve out their own success stories.

Secondly, with a focus on the practicalities of making dreams happen, we are dedicating our efforts to enhancing the grant funding that serves as the life-force of our programs. Our target is to boost TRIO grant funding received on behalf of Oregon educational institutions and non-profit organizations by a significant 10% over the next three years. This will entail an aggressive, strategic approach, including a hefty increase in the number of grant applications submitted, along with meticulous technical reviews.

Lastly, we set our sights on the horizon - the success of our students. We're setting an ambitious benchmark, targeting an 80% graduation rate among TRIO program participants within the next five years. But we won't stop there. Our plan includes an intensive training program for TRIO professionals and a solid foundation of student success programs that cater to the whole individual, acknowledging the importance of socio-emotional well-being.

SMART Objective 1.1: Given the diverse nature of Oregon's population, OTA intends to establish partnerships with five additional schools spanning rural, urban, and suburban areas by December 2026.

SMART Objective 1.2: To address inequities in education, OTA will focus recruitment efforts on underrepresented communities with the objective of increasing their representation in TRIO program enrollment by June 2027.

SMART Objective 2.1: A key aspect of our goal is a 40% increase in the number of grant applications submitted by Oregon institutions by December 2026. This requires strategic planning and deployment of resources.

SMART Objective 2.2: OTA will review 60% of the TRIO grant applications from Oregon by the end of 2026.

SMART Objective 3.1: To better support student success, OTA plans to develop comprehensive student success program best practices that provides tailored academic, career, and personal counseling by December 2025.

SMART Objective 3.2: By December 2024, OTA aims to start a strong training program for TRIO professionals. This program will be led by experts who are knowledgeable about all parts of TRIO's support services. It will provide additional help, direction, and motivation to the staff who work towards the success of TRIO students.

Our organization is built around 55 programs focused on college access and career development. We employ over 200 professionals who help more than 11,850 students across Oregon. These professionals are our members and help us accomplish our mission. They identify what students need, and we provide the resources and opportunities that help students succeed academically. Our main role is to develop and support these programs and our members.

Our Executive Director is in charge of carrying out the main aims and plans of our organization. He handles daily tasks, helps organize everyone involved in the organization, and plans its future. He mainly manages the board, finances, our website, communications, and our events. He also works closely with current TRIO programs to offer support and help staff and students achieve their goals. Lastly, he works with external groups to find new opportunities and funding to help us fulfill our aims and find new TRIO grant opportunities for communities that need them. The Executive Director is also a non-voting member of the Northwest Association of Educational Opportunity Programs and the Council for Opportunity in Education.

The Board of Directors for OTA is currently made up of key people from different TRIO programs across Oregon. They have a few main jobs: (1) They give guidance and advice on the organization and its programs. (2) They keep track of the work of the executive director to make sure OTA is meeting its goals and following its plans. (3) They focus on making sure that everything OTA does is centered around the students and aligns with the mission of the organization. (4) They help to decide how to distribute funds for scholarships and international education, and choose the students who will participate in various programs. (5) They volunteer at the conferences that OTA organizes each year. (6) They take part in the strategic planning process to create a forward-thinking vision that meets the needs of the TRIO programs and students in Oregon. (7) They act as caretakers for the organization.

The Oregon TRIO Association was started in 2000 by leaders of TRIO programs who wanted to form a group to support TRIO students and speak to US lawmakers on their behalf. They had yearly meetings to offer help with the program, build community, share successful methods, and arrange a yearly conference for professional development for those working in Oregon's TRIO programs.

In 2011, OTA received its 501(c)(3) designation, and its board structure was designed to provide an annual professional development conference for TRIO professionals; an annual student leadership conference for TRIO students; and a framework to ensure that OTA sends advocates annually to Washington D.C. to advocate on behalf of funding and sustaining TRIO programs nationwide. Since then, OTA has expanded via enhanced TRIO Alumni benefits to our students through board positions, a fellowship program, increased student scholarship funding, networking opportunities, and a continued push to legitimize the organization. In July of 2021, OTA received a large grant from the State of Oregon to support college access for traditionally marginalized students. This funding established a full-time Executive Director position and has led to substantial changes within the organization.

Today, TRIO programs are helping over 11,850 students in Oregon, with a further 200 staff members involved. At OTA, we're focused on strengthening our organization, ensuring its future, and creating more chances for our programs, staff, and students to succeed. Our main aim is to help more students in Oregon by applying for new TRIO grants across the state. We use this grant money to run TRIO programs and provide scholarships to college students who can't get financial aid anymore (and are close to finishing their degrees). We're always looking for new projects and funding to broaden our services and opportunities for students across Oregon. We also work together with other schools, agencies, and non-profit groups to help students do well in college and their careers.

The current activities of OTA include: (1) Working across the state with non-profit groups and schools to find areas that really need TRIO programs and help them get those programs; (2) Holding a yearly conference to train and network TRIO professionals in the state. (3) Planning a yearly student leadership conference to help students develop leadership skills for their future success; (4) Offering an online network for programs and students to connect and organizing our yearly conferences online; (5) Finding out the financial needs of our TRIO programs that haven't been met.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Oregon TRIO Association
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Oregon TRIO Association

Board of directors
as of 05/14/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Naomi McCreary

Southern Oregon University

Term: 2027 - 2023

Christine Riehl

Clatsop Community College

Ashley Echang

Portland Community College

Sara Channell

Rogue Community College

Erik Ruch

Mt. Hood Community College

Amy Davila-Klautzsch

Oregon State University

Chris Solario

Western Oregon University

Naomi McCreary

Southern Oregon University

Cassie Copeland

Oregon State University Cascades

Katie Chiavarini

Chemeketa Community College

Jordan Jay

Student

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/16/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/16/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.