Programa Velasco

Educate and Empower in El Salvador

Downers Grove, IL   |  www.programavelasco.org

Mission

Programa Velasco's mission is to educate and empower children and entrepreneurial women in El Salvador to build strong families and create better futures.

Ruling year info

2011

Executive Director

Ms. Annie Boyd-Ramirez

Main address

PO Box 601

Downers Grove, IL 60515 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-2851786

NTEE code info

Kindergarten, Nursery Schools, Preschool, Early Admissions (B21)

Economic Development (S30)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

PV seeks to address the lack of women-specific opportunities in Salvadoran society and confront the patriarchal structure that upholds unbalanced systems of power and limits women’s potential. Working almost entirely in the informal sector, women are often at will to the ebb and flow of customers and the inconsistencies of the economy, which commonly means having unreliable income. This leaves many women poor and powerless in their roles as business owners, mothers and community members. In this position of powerlessness, women can become subject to violence and oppression, which further prevents their emergence from poverty in Salvadoran society. Currently, there is no other nonprofit organization or government agency that provides these women with business training, opportunities for personal development or mental health services, like PV does. Additionally, there is a lack of financial support and mental health services among early education programs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Women's Empowerment Project

Since 2014, PV’s core service has been the Women’s Empowerment Project (WEP), a two-year comprehensive training program that interrupts cycles of gender inequity and intergenerational poverty by empowering entrepreneurs to confront and overcome the emotional, technical, and social barriers that can limit their economic mobility and personal growth.

The 2021-2022 cohort of an estimated 40 entrepreneurs will participate in workshops, tutoring, mentorship, and counseling services. The WEP trains them to identify their strengths, gain business and financial skills and build greater self confidence to make their own decisions. The overall outcome is for 75% of entrepreneurs to earn enough income from their small business to cover at least 50% or more of their families’ budget.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adults

Since 2007, PV has partnered with ANADES, a local nonprofit to financially support initiatives that increase access to its early child development center and mental health services for families who are impacted by poverty and violence.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Women's Empowerment Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of businesses developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Women's Empowerment Project

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women

Related Program

Women's Empowerment Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In essence, what we are trying to accomplish is our mission: to educate and empower children and families to crate social change in El Salvador.

Our vision is: Families that thrive; educated and emboldened to interrupt generational cycles of poverty and build peaceful community.

For our main programs, these are our recent goals:

Goals for Early Childhood Education:
1) Improve the quality of education and instruction at the child development center.

Goals for Family Support Services:
1) Improve the quality of social services
2) Expand access to social support services

Goals for Women's Economic Empowerment:
1) Build the Women's Empowerment Project into a replicable project model with proven success.
2) Improve the retention rate of WEP participants and their continued engagement with the project.
3) Ensure the WEP can operate independently of grant funding.

Strategies for Early Childhood Education:

1) Edit the curriculum to include research-based programming on social-emotional development and language acquisition.
2) Fund a teacher's salary
3) Edit the curriculum and the center's protocol to reflect a trauma informed approach.
4) Increase the teachers' and staff members' knowledge and capacity to implement the curriculum by hosting quarterly trainings.

Strategies for Family Support Services:

1) Systemize the social support services into evidence-based clinical intervention models informed by an appropriate theoretical focus (trauma-informed care, social-emotional learning, etc.) as well as best practices from the field.
2) Compliment current services with adult literacy classes and instruction on financial literacy.
3) Include funding for a second social worker/family support specialist to assist with social service programs.
4) Implement an engagement program for children and families who once were enrolled in the center so they can continue participating in certain activities.
5) Lower barriers to participation. This will help prevent families from “falling through the cracks" and allow families who are genuinely interested in taking advantage of the opportunities available to overcome logistical barriers that limit them from participating.
6) Two Parent workshops for families enrolled in CDIAA and San Ramon: Expand parent support workshops to include families whose children are not enrolled in center; a total of two groups will be held – one with families of children enrolled in the center and one with families whose children aren't.

Strategies for Women's Economic Empowerment
1) Contract a single individual or group of individuals with expertise in economic empowerment and small businesses to implement the entire economic empowerment course.
2) Develop an in-house curriculum for course content based on skills to be acquired by participants at specific stages within the project.
3) Synchronize the economic empowerment course objectives and desired skill set with the mentorship component of the project.
4) Integrate a comprehensive focus on health into the project.
5) Lower barriers to participation in the project. This will help prevent women from “falling through the cracks" in the project, allowing women who are genuinely interested in taking advantage of the opportunities available within the project to overcome logistical barriers that limit their success.
6) Differentiate the WEP experience for first and second year participants.
7) Strengthen the savings and lending group.
8) Hold quarterly gatherings for WEP graduates
9) Include WEP graduates in a twice yearly evaluation process.
10) Create a sponsorship program for women in the program.

The capabilities for meeting our goals include the following:

1) Committed staff and board of directors to invest in human and monetary resources to implementing this strategic plan

2) Much of the ground work is already in place, the goals we have identified are improving the quality of our programs and expanding access to them. To do this, we will seek additional funding from a variety of sources.

3) Our team has the background in program management to implement necessary changes.

Our early childhood education program has provided over 341 scholarships, supported over 292 families with social work and counseling services and has invested over $11,200 into women owned businesses.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently,

Financials

Programa Velasco
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Programa Velasco

Board of directors
as of 9/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Juan Velasco

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data