WOMEN AND CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTRE

Accelerating social innovators.

aka Loom International   |   Portland, OR   |  www.loominternational.org

Mission

Loom International brings people, resources, training and information together for the benefit of women and children at risk. We are committed to bring change by working together in hope and interdependence.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Colleen Milstein

Main address

14504 NE Fremont Ct,

Portland, OR 97232 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-2924621

NTEE code info

International Relief (Q33)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Loom International was founded in 2007 by Janna Moats. She had spent time traveling and meeting extensively with local practitioners around the world who were doing great work serving the vulnerable in their communities. Soon she noticed a disturbing trend. Their projects were failing at high rates even though they were passionate and committed. Staff were burnt out and discouraged, programs were falling apart, resources were scarce. After much research, asking questions and listening, Janna discovered time and again that what these local social innovators lacked were relationships, resources, training and connections. Loom was birthed in response to this need—an organization that would come alongside, champion and empower social innovators bringing hope and future to the most vulnerable around the world.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Vuka

Small Business Start-Up Training: A Six-month cohort program training Social Innovators in the basics of starting a small-scale social enterprise.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Social and economic status
Sexual identity

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of educators who have opportunities to attend programs offered by professional organizations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships, Teachers, Economically disadvantaged people, People of African descent

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All educators are teachers, social workers, and other vetted leaders in their communities. The programs are being multiplied by equipping these leaders to facilitate and train their communities.

Number of children who are benefiting from teachers having received further education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships, Social and economic status, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of stakeholders that report that our organization helped improve their knowledge of child care issues in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Loom emerged from the belief that social innovators are the local experts – the ones who know their communities best. Our goal is to strategically build their capacity for greater effectiveness and accelerate their growth towards sustainability. To do this, we focus on ten strategic ingredients to sustainable, thriving communities:
Education
Family
Health
Jobs
Agriculture
Environment
Culture
Energy
Housing
Faith

These elements are critical to create sustainable, thriving communities – to see parents be able to provide for their families; children have the opportunity of education; young women have the choice of work with dignity; pregnant women and their children have adequate nutrition and medical care; the elderly cared for; and space for all the creativity and culture that is part of a full and rich life.

Local social innovators we partner with are starting schools, clinics, school sponsorship, after-school programs, parenting classes, vocational schools and social enterprise. Loom accelerates these local leaders to expand their impact and work towards sustainable change in which everyone can thrive. Together, we believe that investing wisely in children, families, and their communities means the following generation will contribute much more through their healthy and productive lives.

Loom International believes sustainable social change comes through investing in local people working with the most vulnerable in their communities. Local social innovators work with integrity and passion, bringing hope and change in their community—the place they know best. What they lack are resources, training and relationships with people who believe in them and give them tools to succeed on a much bigger scale.

Loom has identified the biggest roadblocks to success are:

a lack of training
a lack of financial sustainability
a lack of access to reliable infrastructure, such as energy, water, or clinics.

To address these problems, Loom offers tailor-made solutions through capacity building and connections. Our greatest hope is that soon they have everything they need to successfully work without us.

Some of our capacity building solutions include:
Targeting training for those working with children at risk through Loom’s Celebrating Children Workshop
Small business and social enterprise start-up through Vuka Small Business Training and grants
Coalitions among like-minded local innovators for greater efficacy, such as the East Africa Education Alliance
Consultation gatherings of social innovators in a region to share information, strategize on how to move forward and encourage each other
One-on-one coaching with a trained coach
Connection to expertise, training, and funding that Loom cannot provide

With more than 30 years of experience in global development work, Loom’s leadership is obsessed with sustainability. Our founder and executive director have extensive connections and experience throughout the regions of East Africa in which Loom currently works. Our Board of Directors has a diverse range of experience in business, government, NGO, leadership, and financial oversight.

From South Africa to New Zealand to Cameroon, our diverse team brings a wealth of expertise in coaching, international training, best practices among children at risk, and more. Our flagship training, the Celebrating Children Workshop, has been multiplied on four continents and translated into multiple languages, and is now the launching-off point for new capacity building training and initiatives.

Lastly, Loom is only as strong as the strength and integrity of our partners. We are committed to building trusted relationships with grassroots leaders. Once a genuine two-way trust relationship is in place, we do a thorough assessment of leadership, structure, and organization potential, and invest in skill sharpening and capacity building. Initially this relational investment seems time consuming, but it is essential for true exponential growth. Loom’s partners are selected based on their unique ideas, demonstrated commitment, and track record; after which an intentional, customized investment is made to maximize their intervention for long term sustainability.

Ten years after Loom began…

31 pre and primary schools are part of the East African Education Alliance, with planning in place for the next 10 years as we seek to secure funding for 100 new pre/primary schools and 22 secondary/tertiary schools – changing the futures of an entire generation.

3 health clinics and many medical camps
mean fewer children die from preventable diseases, pregnant mothers have a safe place to give birth, and children with disabilities are cared for.

27 small businesses launched a new movement of income generation for the most vulnerable.

Over 65 trainings on 4 continents
transformed hundreds of thousands of lives around the world.

4 agriculture projects steward the environment and train a new generation in effective models of food production.

4 biogas digesters and 40 Biogas Bootcamp students are providing green solutions for Africa’s energy and health crisis.

45 participants of our most recent Trauma Competent Care training
are going on to impact the lives of over 17,400 community members across East Africa.

Since October 2020, 16 facilitators have successfully launched 28 Celebrating Children Workshops in various locations in East Africa. These 16 facilitators have trained 1311 beneficiaries which resulted in approximately 26,649 children being directly impacted.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Loom works from the conviction that when the smallest and weakest in society are cared for, everyone benefits. In every country and community, that is the child. Child well-being and development is the foundation for community and economic development, as capable children become the foundation for a healthy, prosperous and sustainable community. It is our belief that everyone from the Global Church, Governments, International Corporations, NGO’s, the community, the church and families are responsible to acknowledge and work toward each child thriving. When we invest wisely in children and families, the following generation will contribute much more through their healthy and productive lives. Local Experts are starting schools, clinics, school sponsorship, after-school programs, parenting

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We believe that monitoring and evaluation is key to the success of our programs, so we constantly ask for feedback. Here is a list of a few of the changes we have made; changing curriculum, changing information delivery protocols, refocusing priorities, changing feedback questions and modes.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Loom is convinced that the Local Expert knows more about their own context than we do. We accelerate them, because we believe in their ability to transform their community in lasting ways. Our greatest hope is that they have everything they need to successfully work without us. That is the heart of capacity-building.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

WOMEN AND CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTRE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WOMEN AND CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTRE

Board of directors
as of 7/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. David Boyd

Newdea Inc.

Term: 2022 - 2016

Doug De Vries

Host1Help1.com

Lionel Thompson

Charity Director

Colleen Milstein

Loom International

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/07/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White South African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/07/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.