Primary Care Progress

Strengthening the community at the heart of care

Prides Crossing, MA   |  http://www.primarycareprogress.org

Mission

The mission of Primary Care Progress is to strengthen the people at the heart of care through leadership development and community building. Primary Care Progress (PCP) is grounded in the belief that the future of healthcare depends on a vibrant primary care system — and on cultivating engaged and collaborative providers. Again and again, the data is clear: you can’t succeed in practice transformation without engaging constructively and collaboratively with your teams. PCP brings a fresh perspective to leadership and team building. We use a healthcare-specific Relational Leadership model to develop the mindsets, relationships, and tactical skills needed to help transform primary care.

Ruling year info

2011

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Brian Souza

President and Founder

Dr. Andrew Morris-Singer

Main address

PO. Box 156

Prides Crossing, MA 01965 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-2952793

NTEE code info

Nonprofit Management (S50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The need for thoughtful, relationship-focused leadership in healthcare is urgent. From new payment models and new technology to hospital restructuring and quality-improvement initiatives -- the amount and pace of change is dizzying. Amidst this change, the focus is usually on the technical aspect of improvements; the human component gets overlooked. But the research is clear: the clinics that are most successful at implementing and sustaining change are as attentive to the cultural and team dynamics as they are to the technical improvements. Navigating change requires careful attention to the people at the heart of that change. There is also clear evidence that team-based care leads to better health outcomes. Effective leadership and teams decrease cost, improve quality of care, and leave both patients and providers more satisfied. Although the idea of team-based care is prevalent, there is rarely guidance around the practical skills and techniques that create effective teams.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Relational Leadership Institute

The Relational Leadership Institute (RLI) is a semester-long leadership development intensive that is delivered at academic medical institutions. Participants engage in the program as an inter-professional, inter-generational cohort. Sessions are taught by members of the PCP National Team in concert with institutional leaders. The program helps people who are often isolated in their healthcare profession break down silos, connect across age and profession, and build a greater sense of community within their institution.

RLI participants develop the skills to:
- Build relationships and community between their colleagues and patients
- Advocate for change in policies and systems
- Achieve true connection, common vision, and interdependent action to impact healthcare and health

Grounded in PCP’s Relational Leadership framework, these competencies are taught through a combination of training, real-life application, coaching, and peer learning. Over the course of the institute, participants apply their new competencies to existing leadership projects or activities in which they’re already engaged, sharing their insights, experiences, and learnings with peers in their cohort. RLI is currently run at three partner sites: Oregon Health and Science University, University of North Carolina, and as the Relational Leadership Initiative at the University of Utah.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Students

PCP’s Student Action Network brings together teams of students from across the country for a 10-month program that offers leadership development, team coaching, and community building. The program offers students the opportunity to improve public health in their local community while building and practicing leadership skills. Student teams are based on the campuses of academic medical institutions, and include students from across health professions such as nursing, medicine, physical therapy, and pharmacy. Each team is guided by a local faculty advisor.

Across the year each team works to create and implement a community service project. For example, one team last year hosted a panel of experts on ways to respond to the opioid epidemic. Through the project, students learn about leadership, interprofessional teaming, and advocacy. Depending on the project focus they also learn about patient engagement, and social determinants of health.

PCP provides training in relational leadership skills, case consultations to guide student projects, and other learning opportunities. Each August students come together for a weekend-long Leadership Summit to launch their projects, participate in workshops, and build community. Students come together for two more PCP-led events throughout the year to share progress on team projects and connect with each other.

Population(s) Served

Program alumni who are interested in going deeper into Relational Leadership principles can join the Leadership Pathway. Members of the Leadership Pathway participate in intensive courses, peer-to-peer learning, social events, and program delivery. The purpose of the pathway is twofold: it supports members to practice their leadership skills and deepen their learning, and it provides a pipeline of new facilitators, coaches and trainers to support PCP programs. This model offers a way for PCP to build a national community and momentum for change, as well as sustainably grow our program offerings.

The Leadership Pathway experience is tailored to meet each individual’s level of experience and goals for personal growth. Some program alumni come back to be facilitators at our Leadership Summit; they receive training in facilitation skills ahead of the event and an opportunity to debrief with their cohort of other facilitators post-event. Other alumni opt in to our Relational Coaching Course, which allows them to coach and support student teams. PCP uses a “train-the-trainer” model, supporting more experienced senior participants and practicing clinicians to become lead trainers. The Leadership Pathway serves between 50-70 members at any given time.

Population(s) Served
Students
Students

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of healthcare students and providers served by our programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of participants across all PCP-run programs, including the Student Action Network, RLI, and the Leadership Pathway.

Number of health professions served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

PCP brings together participants from multiple health disciplines, including medicine, nursing, physical therapy, social work/behavioral health, pharmacy, dental, and more.

Number of states with a PCP presence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We know that great healthcare improves health. And we know that great leaders and teams provide great healthcare. Primary Care Progress is focused on what creates and sustains great leaders and teams. Our aim is to support the people at the heart of care who will transform care for all.

In the short-term, it is our goal to help individuals build the mindset and tactical skills needed to create strong interpersonal connections and positive team dynamics. In the long-term, we work to build leadership capacity and drive systems-level change by focusing on three fundamental things:
1. Provider wellbeing, specifically by supporting strong relationships that allow clinicians to be their full, human selves.
2. Fostering strong connections across teams, across professions, and across the wider system.
3. Supporting health professionals to have agency, voice, and power to help drive the systems-level change that healthcare needs.

Our model, Relational Leadership, is an inclusive approach to leadership, focused on consensus building, co-creation, and authentic understanding of one's own and others' experiences and values.

Our vision is to have a healthcare workforce that is connected, empowered, and well; who can provide excellent patient care and drive the positive transformation that our healthcare system so badly needs.

Primary Care Progress (PCP) is creating a more effective, connected, and relational healthcare sector. Our three cornerstone programs are the Student Action Network, the Relational Leadership Institute, and the Leadership Pathway.

Central to our work is the importance of engaging both students and practicing clinicians to create positive change now and in the future. Our programs are interprofessional, with participants representing over 15 health disciplines, including physicians, nurses, physical therapists, medical assistants, and more. Participants are from across generations and career stages, come from diverse backgrounds, and work in a range of clinical settings. The educational experiences we offer are deep and transformational; participants receiving coaching, peer-to-peer support, and ongoing learning opportunities.

PCP is committed to ongoing improvement of our programs and our organizational practices. We hold ourselves accountable in four key ways:

1. Relevance -- The healthcare landscape is continually changing, the pain points clinicians encounter in practice are changing, and the national conversation around healthcare is changing. PCP keeps on the pulse of these ongoing changes, evolving our curriculum and content to meet the needs of the moment.
2. Reach -- We seek to expand the reach of our programs, while maintaining a consistently high-quality experience for participants. In growing our reach, we are intentional about increasing the diversity of participants, geographic locations, healthcare professions, and clinical settings.
3. Response - Based on the response we receive from participants, PCP is thoughtfully iterating and improving our programs. We are continually refining our materials to ensure participants find them meaningful, engaging, and useful.
4. Impact -- We are committed to offering programs that change people’s knowledge, their behavior, and ultimately lead to improvements in performance -- individually, as a team, and as an organization.

Primary Care Progress senior leadership team includes CEO Brian Souza, Chief Program Officer, Jane Cooper-Driver, and Director of Operations, Kate Hansen-Roxas. The Board of Directors is a diverse group of leaders, with deep experience in the healthcare and nonprofit sectors. Founder and Board Chair, Andrew Morris-Singer, is an Internal Medicine physician as well as a thought leader and long-time champion of primary care.

All programs are delivered by a talented team of experienced trainers, composed of practicing healthcare professionals from across the country. Trainers reflect the diversity of background, profession, expertise, and clinical setting reflected in the greater PCP network. COVID-19 has prompted PCP to pause in-person programming and redesign how we deliver our curriculum. Creating more virtual programming will allow PCP to reach more participants at a broader range of clinics, institutions, and health systems.

Primary Care Progress was founded in 2010 by a group of students and faculty at Harvard Medical School. Within a few years the organization expanded to campuses across the country and coalesced into a national Student Action Network. Students and faculty advisors gather each summer for our Leadership Summit, a weekend of engaging workshops and community-building.

In 2017, Primary Care Progress collaborated with Oregon Health and Science University to develop the Relational Leadership Institute (RLI). Participants progress through the semester-long program as an interprofessional and inter-generational cohort of up to 40 people. Building on success and popularity, RLI launched at two new institutions: University of North Carolina and the Relational Leadership Initiative at the University of Utah. These local RLI programs are gaining traction and, based on evaluation findings, are having a significant positive impact on participants. As of 2019, a total of 221 interdisciplinary health professionals and trainees have participated in RLI.

When the global COVID-19 pandemic began, we pivoted to meet the moment. We launched the Relational Response Initiative, which offered those on the front line and others in our network actionable ways to practice Relational Leadership amidst the unfolding COVID-19 crisis. In response to a national reckoning on racism, we began to examine and evolve our curriculum to directly address issues of identity and power in a relational way.

In 2020, PCP marked our 10th anniversary, and we move forward into our next decade with great challenges and opportunities ahead. As ever, PCP is focused on the depth and quality of programming with our core partners:

Understanding that topics like health and race are intertwined, we have begun adapting our curriculum and improving internal processes with a sharper equity and inclusion lens, so that we may better support all PCP stakeholders in bringing a relational response to dialogue and action around race, identity, and power.
As telehealth expands and healthcare teams become increasingly virtual, we are building a new initiative to support now-virtual teams as they adapt to working in increasingly dispersed, remote, and matrixed teams.

Over the next three years, PCP is working to refine our Theory of Change and develop a long term strategic plan. This plan will help define organization-wide impact measures to evaluate the short-term results of our programs, along with long-term assessments of the impact of PCP on graduates’ career trajectories and team efficacy.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Like many organizations, PCP has "gone virtual" with much of our programming. We tried out a software platform to host a virtual version of our annual Student Leadership Summit. After getting overwhelming and positive feedback from participants about the experience, PCP decided to use the same platform for next year's summit in August 2021.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, We don't have the right systems or technology to aggregate feedback across all our programs,

Financials

Primary Care Progress
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Primary Care Progress

Board of directors
as of 8/24/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Andrew Morris-Singer

J. Nwando Olayiwola

The Ohio State University College of Medicine

Bryan Simmons

Arcus Foundation

Susan Kaufman

Susan L. Kaufman Consulting

Julian Harris

Deerfield

Jonathan Sugarman

Global to Local

Andrew Morris-Singer

Primary Care Progress

Victoria Sale

Ready Responders

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/20/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data