Youth Development

Allow Good

Empowering Youth to Take Action in their World

aka Allow Good

Evanston, IL

Mission

Empower youth through the tools of philanthropy to take meaningful action in their world. We envision a world with engaged youth, inclusive participation, and vibrant communities. We inspire youth to become actively engaged in addressing social challenges throughout their lives.

Ruling Year

2011

Principal Officer

Elizabeth Newton

Main Address

922 Davis Street

Evanston, IL 60201 USA

Keywords

youth, education, civic, action, philanthropy

EIN

27-2962097

 Number

1544692339

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

IRS Filing Requirement

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Programs + Results

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

School Based Program

Custom Programs

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

87% of participants are able to identify social challenges the world faces

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

School Based Program

78% of participants can identify organizations working to address those challenges

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

School Based Program

76% of participants can come up with a plan to address the challenges

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

School Based Program

82% of participants can work with others to address the challenge

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

School Based Program

Number of students in School Based Program

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

School Based Program

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

The goals of Allow Good programs are to equip youth with the knowledge, skills, and capacity to take meaningful action in their communities and to inspire youth to become actively engaged in addressing social challenges throughout their lives. This addresses a pressing need facing our society - engaging our youth in their communities for the long-term benefit of having a society of socially engaged citizens. We are particularly focused on engaging youth who are at-risk from becoming disconnected from their communities.

Through our programs, youth begin the process of engaging in their communities by first learning about and networking with a variety of community organizations and leaders. We know that when youth are equipped with, engaged in, and taking opportunities to build their own community networks and relationships (part of their “social capital"), they grow as individuals and improve their life trajectories. This social capital is key for their futures. It allows them to build interpersonal relationships, develop the networks and skills necessary to finding and keeping jobs, problem solve and improve communication skills, and they become better able to access community government and public resources.

We directly engage youth in their communities by shifting power to youth to become part of the solution to community challenges. They then broaden the representation of community members who are addressing community needs and disparities and build the capacity of the communities in which they reside.

Our school-based program educates youth in public high schools on the social challenges facing their communities, equips them with the tools to effect change, and engages them in taking action for social good. To do this, we work in a “near-peer" model, developing chapters on college campuses and training collegiate chapter members in our curriculum. We empower the collegiate students to teach our curriculum in high school classrooms on a weekly basis under the supervision of high school teachers. Our classes begin with the high school students exploring their local community and its social challenges, philanthropic theory, organizational evaluation and grantmaking. The high school students then start the process, as a group, of narrowing to a single social challenge of importance to them. Next, they research and vet organizations in their community addressing this challenge, issue an RFP, and review grant applications from local organizations. The class culminates with the high school students becoming the grantors and making a donor-funded $1,000 grant to an organization of their choosing.

We currently have three Allow Good collegiate chapters - at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University and Loyola University of Chicago. Each chapter partners with public high schools in its neighborhood. The University of Chicago chapter works with King College Prep and Hyde Park Academy, CPS schools in Chicago's Hyde Park neighborhood. The Loyola chapter works with Senn High School, a CPS school in its Edgewater neighborhood. The Northwestern chapter works with Niles North High School in Skokie and Evanston Township High School students through Youth Opportunities United (Y.O.U.).

Our reach for 2017 includes:
-45 college students and chapter leaders at our 3 collegiate partners
-415 high school students across 17 classes in 5 Chicago area public high schools who received the Allow Good curriculum
-Distribution of 17 donor-funded $1,000 grants by the high school students to local nonprofits addressing social challenges in their communities. The grantees represented a variety of social issues including: immigrant and refugee services; youth health services; safe spaces for youth after school; and local food sources for the homeless.

We survey our youth to measure their understanding and motivation in three key areas: understanding of societal challenges and the philanthropic process; ability to address societal challenges; and independent action taken. We also seek feedback from all involved Allow Good teachers (collegiate and high school), as well as the community organizations that interact with our students. As we begin to capture long-term metrics that demonstrate the effectiveness of our work, we are also continually assessing our curriculum and looking for ways to make it even stronger.

Our early results are exciting. We know the following about our 2016 pilot year youth in our school based program:

94% are able to identify social challenges the world faces
85% can identify organizations working to address those challenges
82% can come up with a plan to address the challenges
90% can work with others to address the challenge
100% took independent action following class completion

We are energized by the independent recognition and feedback we have already received. Our two Allow Good chapters recently won the Generous U competition from the Sillerman Center for the Advancement of Philanthropy at Brandeis University. And the director of a local food pantry that received a student-directed grant in 2016 stated:

“I can sense that a certain “awareness" has been instilled within the young participants…not only of themselves, but of their place as members of our community as a whole. It is encouraging to see that students are not only learning about the big picture of what philanthropy means, but are truly processing what they have learned in order to formulate plans of action. ... A number of the students have spoken with me to hear more about the Food Pantry, and have asked how to volunteer there during the summer. Some are even planning to organize more food drives when school begins next fall. Something has gone seriously right at Niles North [High School]!"

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Operations

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Sexual Orientation

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Disability

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Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity