Healthy Harvest Food Bank

Your Local Farm to Food Bank

Warsaw, VA   |  www.hhfb.org

Mission

Our Mission: To provide hope in the communities we serve through the right food and education Our Vision: To create healthy, self-sufficient and thriving communities

Ruling year info

2010

President & CEO

Mr. Mark Kleinschmidt

Main address

P.O. Box 735

Warsaw, VA 22572 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-3080400

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Healthy Harvest Food Bank services are a critical component to the welfare of the communities we serve as we work with our 25 partner pantries to address the food insecurity needs in our region. After discovering the health issues our clients face, our mission grew from simply assisting with logistics and storage of food to improving the nutritional value of the food we provide to our recipients. The food bank of the future will focus on the overall health of recipients and empower them through educational programs with the goal of leading them to self-sufficiency, reducing their long-term dependency on the core food distribution program.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Agricultural Program

The agricultural program is a partnership with local farmers to grow produce and assure access to produce fields for gleaning and harvesting. At the end of FY19 the total amount of fresh produce distributed totaled 641,282 pounds, a 22% increase from the prior year.

The program impacts over 60,000 individuals each year through distribution of fresh produce, increased locally to an average of 51% to each client, the highest percentage of fresh produce distributed in the state of Virginia. Hundreds of state and local volunteers glean and harvest every Saturday from June through December each year and weekdays during the summer. Fresh produce in excess of what is distributed locally is then distributed throughout Central, Western and Southeastern Virginia, including the Eastern Shore.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The core program and basis of the operation is an important benefit we offer the food pantries in our rural area. Through free deliveries to pantries, HHFB has resolved a major challenge faced by Northern Neck and Upper Middle Peninsula food pantries, the ability to transport large quantities of food to their location. In a rural community pantries are typically run by elderly volunteers who face challenges of a lack of time, space, ability and money to serve the hungry in their area. The core program makes it possible for pantries to stretch their dollars further, where it is most needed. Without this program many pantries' only food sources are at retail prices. We deliver over 2.3 million pounds of food to families in need across our service area. We provide each client with 40% fresh produce, 40% non-perishable food items, 10% meat and 10% bakery, dairy.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Through our Backpack Buddies program, we provide students six “child friendly” meals each Friday for the weekend in Richmond, Lancaster, Middlesex, Northumberland and Westmoreland Counties.

Richmond County – 35 children served weekly

Lancaster County – 120 children served weekly

Middlesex County – 120 children served weekly

Northumberland County - 50 children served weekly

Westmoreland County – 45 children served weekly

​The program continues to grow as we address more of the need. There is still more to be done to ensure every struggling child has access to proper nutrition on the weekends. The program is an effort of cooperation involving public schools and other community partners to provide children in need with additional nutritional support by supplying a weekend’s worth of food each Friday.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The senior program is a supplemental food program for seniors 60 and above at 125% of the poverty level. Each month the food bank provides one healthy food supplement to qualified seniors through two Lancaster County pantries and one Middlesex County pantry. Residents who meet the criteria receive this food in addition to any foods they receive under their local Food Pantry and U.S.D.A. programs.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Healthy Food Pharmacy is a collaboration between Healthy Harvest Food Bank, Northern Neck-Middlesex Free Health Clinic and Virginia Cooperative Extension. The program targets individuals who struggle with obesity, diabetes, pre-diabetes, hypertension and other health related issues. The goal is to transform patient wellness by offering fresh produce, nutrition education, and hands-on cooking classes to teach them healthy eating and living as a way of combating these health issues.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Central Virginia Foodbank Partner Agency 2010

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Core Feeding Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

This metric represents the total number of individuals we serve monthly throughout the year.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Agricultural Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric represents the pounds of fresh produce that were gleaned and harvested from local farmer's fields and distributed to our clients in need.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This represents the number of partner pantries we work with through our core delivery program as well as other organizations we partner with on special programs.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals are simple and systemic. Increase the nutritional value of food provided to residents in our service area by increasing produce as a greater percentage of food and reducing the reliance on heavily processed food sources; provide delivery of necessary supplemental food free of charge to our network of 25 partner pantries; develop further awareness throughout the region of the needs of residents and the available access to nutritional food sources; develop educational programs that will address the issue of generational poverty.

We currently provide food and grocery products (40% produce, 40% non-perishable, 10% meat, 10% bakery/dairy food items) to a network of over 30 food pantries and feeding sites servicing individuals at risk and families in need of "supplemental" meals.

The agricultural program is critical to reaching our goal of increasing the nutritional value of the food we provide to our recipients. Through community outreach and online platforms, we continue to promote this program throughout our region and beyond to inform and educate. We also work with local farmers to provide fresh produce as a mainstay of food distributed to clients (approximately 40% of food distributed locally) which increases the nutritional value of food received and establishes a new normalcy for produce as an essential part of the food distribution system. We have exceeded our goal of fresh produce by 45-50% consistently since 2016.

Through the support of our local community and foundation grants we continue to provide delivery to our partner pantries free of charge. We have increased our presence in the community by engaging in speaking opportunities, community events and presentations. We will continue to increase our public appearances and advocate for the services we offer.

In 2018, we implemented Healthy Food Pharmacy. The program targets individuals who struggle with obesity, diabetes, pre-diabetes, hypertension and other health related issues. The goal is to transform patient wellness by offering fresh produce, nutrition education, and hands-on cooking classes to teach them healthy eating and living as a way of combating these issues.

We will implement a new program and innovative approach to teaching future generations sustainable, healthy food farming as funding becomes available. Healthy Harvest Fresh is a cutting-edge aquaponics educational program and future partnership with regional schools. Aquaponics is a combination of aquaculture (raising fish) and hydroponics (the soil-less growing of plants) that grows fish and plants together in one integrated system. The program is designed to expand a student’s knowledge of nature’s natural cycles, plant science, nitrification, biology and fish anatomy as well as nutrition and high-tech agriculture. The hands-on approach for students will instill a sense of responsibility and inspire creativity and excitement as they learn about healthy eating and sustainable production of healthy proteins and fresh produce.

We will continue to research the viability of additional programs that will provide healthy food options to those in need.

We have a dedicated team of professionals who work together to accomplish the goals we have set forth as well as support from the community we serve.

In 2010 Northern Neck Food Bank begins in the back of a pickup truck and later moves into a small warehouse in White Stone, VA officially representing Lancaster, Northumberland, Richmond and Middlesex Counties. Distributes 31,000 pounds of food through 4 pantries serving 700 people. In 2011 NNFB distributes 419,000 pounds of food through 8 pantries serving 1,800 people. In 2012 an online database connects NNFB to partner pantries. The Agricultural Program is developed and quickly becomes our signature program. Distributes 696,000 pounds of food through 11 pantries serving 2,500 people. In 2013 NNFB moves to a larger facility centrally located in Warsaw, VA. Distributes 1.1 million pounds of food through 14 pantries serving 3,100 people. In 2014 the organization expanded into Essex, Westmoreland and Colonial Beach. Distributes 1.2 million pounds of food through 21 pantries serving 4,200 people. In 2015 NNFB distributes 1.6 million pounds of food through 25 pantries serving 6,750 people. In 2016 planning begins for future expansion. Distributes over 1.7 million pounds of food through 27 pantries serving 8,700 people. In 2017 NNFB distributes a record 2.1 million pounds of food through 28 pantries serving 12,274 people. In 2018, based on the rate of growth and the development of new relationships throughout the region and beyond, NNFB changes its name to Healthy Harvest Food Bank to reflect the evolving focus and goal of providing healthier food options to those in need.

We have increased the number of individuals we serve by 49% in the last five years; we distributed a record 2.3 million pounds of food last year. We have increased the amount of fresh produce we distribute by 22% in the last year. We have increased the number of students we serve through the Backpack Buddies program by 50% in Lancaster County, 125% in Northumberland County and 200% in Westmoreland County in the last year.

Over 96% of the food bank's operating expenses go directly to feeding those in need in the region. The food bank has moved into a new facility designed with ample space to grow and implement new programs as well as reach those who may still struggle with food insecurity.

Financials

Healthy Harvest Food Bank
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Healthy Harvest Food Bank

Board of directors
as of 6/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Paul Sciacchitano

Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Term: 2020 - 2023


Board co-chair

Mr. Craig Giese

Dehnert, Clarke & Co.

Term: 2019 - 2022

Paul Sciacchitano

Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Craig Giese

Dehnert & Clarke & Co.

Jennifer English

Community Volunteer

Rod Parker

Parker Farms, LLC

Joe Parker

Parker Farms, LLC

Jane Crowther

Omega Protein

Dave Cryer

Hands Across Middlesex

Karen Burke

Burke Jewelers

Suzanne Novak

Erudyne, LLC

Mark Kleinschmidt

Healthy Harvest Food Bank

Stanley Lankford

Connemara Corporation

Brian Jenkins

Independent Consultant

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/02/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/21/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.