SILVER2021

Boundless Freedom Project

Lighting a path to freedom

aka BP3   |   Sacramento, CA   |  boundlessfreedom.org

Mission

OUR MISSION Lighting a path to freedom by sharing mindfulness, ethics & compassion practices with people impacted by incarceration. We continue to expand and develop our offerings of Buddhist services and mindfulness programs both for our sanghas inside prison and in support of returning citizens. We share meditation, mindfulness and movement practices, encourage healing and creativity, co-create safe and inclusive communities (sanghas), advocate for decarceration, and support artists, Buddhists, change agents, dharma practitioners, meditators, teachers, and movement facilitators interested in working in the prison system!

Ruling year info

2011

Founder

Diane Wilde

Executive Director

Ayla Benjamin

Main address

5960 South Land Park Dr #584

Sacramento, CA 95822 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Folsom Pathways Sangha

EIN

27-3086459

NTEE code info

Buddhist (X50)

Interfaith Issues (X90)

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Boundless Freedom Project aims to expand and develop offerings of Buddhist services, mindfulness programs, compassion and ethics practices, and tools for transformation both for incarcerated people and any people impacted by incarceration. Knowing that the incarerated individuals we work with will one day rejoin our communities outside of prison, we aim to equip them with practical mindfulness techniques that they can use to sustain a positive, productive and harm-free life, supported by a framework of ethical behaviors and attitudes, and rooted in an empathetic and compassionate view of themselves and others. Our current programs are successful, but our supply cannot meet the demand. So over the next five years, we hope to expand our services to every prison in California, making mindfulness meditation accessible to every incarcerated person in the state.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mindfulness meditation and Buddhist services

We have volunteers going in to prisons and jails throughout California providing mindful movement, meditation, and Buddhist teachings to people experiencing incarceration.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

We provide services to newly released group participants (formerly incarcerated/returning citizens) to support their integration back into society. We have supported with needs such as clothing, cellphones, transportation, security deposits, etc.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

We run daylong meditation retreats in various institutions. This is an immersive experience in which incarcerated participants are allowed an opportunity to take their meditation and mindfulness practices deeper. This is also a community building experience where teachers are able to spend an entire day with the group.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mindfulness meditation and Buddhist services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Training workshops and continuing ed. opportunties for volunteers

Number of program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people

Related Program

Mindfulness meditation and Buddhist services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of correctional institutions in which we are running Buddhist services and meditation programs

Number of conferences held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Newly Released Inmate (Returning Citizen) Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Annual Retreat for volunteers and returning citizens

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We plan to deepen our impact by increasing our volunteer base, and bringing our services to prisons currently lacking in rehabilitation programs. We intend to strengthen our programming by intensifying our volunteer recruitment efforts by seeking and forming partnerships with other Buddhist groups throughout California. We also intend to increase our volunteer trainings, particularly in trauma and race-sensitive mindfulness practices. In addition, we are creating a Program Evaluation with which we will be able to collect valuable data about the impact of services.

We plan to deepen our impact by increasing our volunteer base, and bringing our services to prisons currently lacking in rehabilitation programs. We intend to strengthen our programming by intensifying our volunteer recruitment efforts by seeking and forming partnerships with other Buddhist groups throughout California. We also intend to increase our volunteer trainings, particularly in trauma and race-sensitive mindfulness practices. In addition, we are creating a Program Evaluation with which we will be able to collect valuable data about the impact of services.

Our organization relies heavily on our devoted base of volunteers. With their collective expertise and training, we are able to meet our programmatic goals at every prison where we provide services. Our “onboarding” process ensures that our volunteers are proficiently qualified to work under stressful conditions within prisons and jails, with a sensitivity to the specific traumas impacting nearly 100% of the population we serve. Our working Board of Directors serve to guide our organization’s trajectory, continually generating plans to improve the work we do, both internally and in the prisons. We are currently developing partnerships with other prison program providers which will allow us to leverage our collective power into greater agency within the California prison system. Also, because our work is situated within the chaos of prison, we have recently created an Advisory Council and a Conflict Resolution Committee, both of which will allow our organization to be more responsive and supportive to our volunteers when conflictive incidents occur.

Buddhist practice is experiential, not dogmatic. It is available to everyone. Through meditation, mindfulness in daily life, and frank discussions in a safe environment, attitudes of selfishness, hatred and ignorance are seen for what they are; suffering for the individual and those with whom he/she is in contact. Thousands of men and women have taken part in Buddhist services due to the dedication of our cadred of volunteers. Inmates have had the experience of “seeing things clearly” and have disavowed gang influence, and racial biases. At the end of one of our services, a Hispanic inmate (who is now released and working with juvenile offenders) stated, “I wish I could just be with this group. All colors and religions. This is sanity.” Our long term goal is to have these teachings available to all inmates in the California prison system, regardless of spiritual tradition or lack of any spiritual tradition. As one inmate wrote to us recently, “Now that the door has been opened, I can’t go back.”

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Boundless Freedom Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Boundless Freedom Project

Board of directors
as of 11/01/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Nancy Hart

Sabrina Modelle

Heather Mackin

Haley Perkins

Maurice Kenney

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/19/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.