Wells Bring Hope

Saving Lives with Safe Water

Los Angeles, CA   |  www.wellsbringhope.org

Mission

Wells Bring Hope is committed to drilling solar-powered, mechanized wells to bring safe water and sanitation to rural villages in Niger, West Africa - the poorest country in the world. Our vision: saving lives with safe water.

Ruling year info

2010

President

Ms. Barbara Goldberg

Main address

16563 Park Lane Cir

Los Angeles, CA 90049 USA

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EIN

27-3123341

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Niger Rural Water Project

Wells Bring Hope drills wells to bring safe water and sanitation to rural villages in Niger, West Africa, the poorest country in the world, according to the UN Development Index. Prior to drilling a well, women and girls as young as seven walk 4-6 miles a day to find water, water that often causes death and disease. After a well is drilled, child mortality is reduced by upwards of 70%, combined with the health benefits of improved sanitation, hygiene and nutrition. Girls are able to go to school and women can work and earn money. We train women to start their own small businesses via savings groups in a village. Lives are transformed for generations to come. It also funds solar-generated water projects for health clinics.

Population(s) Served
Health
Social and economic status

Where we work

Awards

Featured Charity 2011

Helpers Unite

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of wells drilled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, Muslims, Extremely poor people, Women and girls

Related Program

Niger Rural Water Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We are now only funding fully mechanized, solar-powered water systems, which are a tremendous improvement over hand pump wells. In 2021, we funded 57 taps and one complete system for a health clinic.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Simply stated, our mission is to save lives with safe water. We view the drilling of a well as the “entry point", the first step in transforming lives for generations to come. We continue working with a village for over 15 years after a well is drilled with the following objectives in mind:

1. Reduce premature deaths and the prevalence of water-borne disease
2. Improve hygienic standard and awareness among villagers
3. Ensure well sustainability
4. Expand education opportunities for girls, and empower women
5. Promote economic development by providing microfinance education for women
6. Empower villagers by giving them the tools they need to improve their quality of life and feel a sense of hope in their future

We believe that you cannot do development from a distance. You have to be community-based, and to be community-based, you have to be community paced. Ensuring sustainability is one of our primary goals, so we place a strong emphasis on engaging the community.

To ensure well longevity, villagers are taught how to maintain their well, how to handle malfunction and where to obtain replacement parts. Before a well is drilled, a committee is formed to administer the well. The government of Niger mandates that half of the members be women. The committee's sole responsibility is to maintain the well. The villagers are involved in the process of maintenance and take ownership of their well. Everyone must contribute a small amount of money to a well maintenance fund to cover the cost of repairs.
Our partner, World Vision, continues to educate the villagers and monitor the wells and pumps for an additional 15 years to ensure the sustainable management of the well and its water quality.

We aim for deep change, lasting change, generational change -- and that is harder to do with adults than with kids. Our long-term plan is to empower the local community so it will be able to identify its own challenges and opportunities, test out its own solutions and build its own local institutions to manage the change process –funded by the community with mechanisms they themselves have devised.

The actual duration of which we continue to work with a village ranges from 12 to 18 years depending on the rate of progress of the community. This time frame is long enough for school-age kids to "graduate" to adulthood and become community leaders of the next generation. This type of long-term community development cannot be achieved from a distance. The local, and consistence, presence of World Vision helps us to achieve this goal. Our community-based approach ensures the positive changes that Wells Bring Hope has brought to the community will last for generations to come.

Thanks to our partnership with World Vision, we are capable of drilling 100 wells per year in Niger.

To see the number of wells we have drilled and the lives we've transformed with safe water, visit: www.wellsbringhope.org/progress.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve the people who reside in rural villages in Niger, West Africa, those who do not have access to safe, clean water. Women and girls as young as seven, walk 4-6 miles every day to find water, water that is often contaminated. One out of seven children dies in rural Niger, from contaminated water. We serve people who face increasingly frequent famines. When a well is drilled in a village, child mortality is reduced by upwards of 70%. Girls have time to attend school and women can work and earn money. When a famine comes, the crops they grow enable them to survive.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Early on, we realized that it was not enough to give clean water; women wanted to work and earn money but needed education. We established a savings group program to accomplish this. Over time, we heard that the hand pump was laborious to use. Changing the system was economically infeasible until September 2021, when we began installing cost efficient solar-powered water systems. This crucial change has helped alleviate the daily burden of women in getting water because now they simply have to turn on a tap. In 2019, we learned that there were many health clinics in rural Niger with no access to any water. Women in labor had to carry water for their delivery. Our mission expanded to include one solar-powered water project for a health clinic a year.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback from the women and girls we serve has clearly shifted power to them. When women knew that they were heard, that they were given training to start their own small businesses, power was shifted from only men to both women and men. As women who contributed to the economic well-being of their families, they shared in decision-making regarding monetary expenditures. The village chief and elders viewed women in a different light, acknowledging their contribution to improving life in the village. Women are no longer as dependent as they once were, and they are not powerless the way they were before they began working and earning money. Men no longer “made the rules,” nor did they have all the power within the family.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Inability to visit Niger due to terrorist threats, dangerous to access remote villages & Covid-19,

Financials

Wells Bring Hope
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Wells Bring Hope

Board of directors
as of 03/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Barbara Goldberg

Wells Bring Hope

Barbara Goldberg

Wells Bring Hope and Salon Forum

Lawrence Johnson

LR Johnson Associates LLC

Ida Harding

Retired

Patricia Vick

Retired

Marsha Hierbaum

DML Marketing Group

Dhivya Sridhar

MBA student

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability