PLATINUM2023

The CLEO Institute Inc

More Climate Crisis, Less Florida

MIAMI, FL   |  http://www.cleoinstitute.org

Mission

TO EDUCATE & EMPOWER COMMUNITIES TO DEMAND CLIMATE ACTION, ENSURING A SAFE, JUST & HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT FOR ALL.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Yoca Arditi-Rocha

Main address

2103 CORAL WAY 2ND FLOOR

MIAMI, FL 33145 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-3185735

NTEE code info

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Founded in 2010, The CLEO Institute (CLEO) is the only women-led nonprofit dedicated to combating the climate crisis in Florida. The devastating hurricanes, increased flooding, and rising temperatures that Floridians regularly experience underscore the need for CLEO's work a need that is magnified in Floridas frontline and BIPOC communities. The majority of residents CLEO serves are vulnerable to climate change impacts due to age, race, gender, and income. Over the past 13 years, CLEO has made significant contributions to statewide climate literacy, engagement, and advocacy in Florida, particularly for economically vulnerable and BIPOC communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CLEO Speakers Network

The goal of the CLEO Speakers Network (CSN) is to build individuals’ speaking capacity to simplify climate science, its seriousness and solutions for the general public. The CSN provides participants training and support. They use credible science to shape their own climate messages and take on as much or as little content as they wish when designing the scope of the presentation they plan to make.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Florida is on the frontlines of climate impacts because of sea-level rise, extreme weather events, and more, climate education is integral to our resilience. Miami-Dade County is the 4th largest school district in the US. Our Climate Resilient Schools program supports climate literacy through a variety of initiatives in Miami-Dade, Orlando, and Tallahassee. By helping our youth understand the science, the impacts, and the solutions they will be better prepared to deal with the climate crisis and advocate for mitigation and adaptation policies at a local and state level. As part of the program, we also host teacher workshops to help teachers teach climate across the curriculum regardless of the subject they teach. We offer schools an afterschool program called CLIP (Climate Leadership Information Program) that trains students to become climate speakers so they can do peer-to-peer lectures to other students in their schools, in addition to doing a school campaign to raise awareness of the climate crisis.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Program for women to connect the dots between the climate crisis and health risks, emergency preparedness, civic engagement, and leadership. Studies show women are more likely than men to be affected during a climate disaster. As first responders in crises or decision-makers at home, women are great agents of change. Provides a much-needed space to support and strengthen women’s leadership in communities through mentorship. Our program aims to help women understand how the climate crisis impacts their community with a focus on women’s health, how to be hurricane-ready, and prepare their household financially ahead of extreme weather events. Lastly, how to use the power of their voice to communicate with elected officials and lift up their community.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Engages and empowers youth to take climate action. Our GenCLEO movement increases our youths' climate literacy and practices youth activism. We provide access opportunities that build their capacity as community leaders like speaking at commission meetings, launching public service announcements, and hosting youth climate strikes.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adolescents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of stories successfully placed in the media

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate civic participation skills (e.g., compromise, perspective-taking)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

genCLEO Youth Empowerment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of training events conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of advocacy contacts with government leaders

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of teachers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Climate Resilient Schools

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goal 1: Make climate a top voting priority in Florida. In order for us to achieve our mission, we need to build an informed community that will demand climate action.

Goal 2: Broaden & scale youth participation in climate movement by allocating additional resources to educate & engage middle/high school & college-aged youth on climate change causes, impacts, & policies.

Goal 3: Collaborate with regional partners with particular emphasis on institutions, utility companies, corporations, and governments to do more on climate policy.

CLEOs diverse team lives and works in the communities it serves; staff is fluent in six local languages. CLEO addresses the intersectionalities of climate issues and social justice by illuminating often-overlooked factors in local climate policy such as marginalization, redlining, and resource exploitation. CLEOs bottom-up and top-down approach bridges the gap between communities, local government, and academia, ensuring community voices are included in climate research and decision-making to foster a more equitable climate response.

CLEOs community programs inspire action, improve climate literacy, build community resilience, and promote equity in climate policy with the aim of shaping a sustainable and secure future for all. Through listening sessions, town halls, advocacy, and programming, CLEO prioritizes the experiences of those most affected by the climate crisis, placing their needs at the forefront of climate policy reform. These efforts have brought residents and decision-makers together, resulting in community-driven solutions that address environmental disparities experienced by low-income residents of color.

CLEO believes that community members should be positioned as experts and that their lived experiences are vital to informing decision-making; this belief begins with our staff. CLEOs staff consists of scientists, K-12 and college educators, social justice and equity professionals, and community organizers, several of whom have public health backgrounds, and all of whom hold steadfast to CLEOs mission and values. Additionally, all of our staff live and work in the communities we serve, with several members having been recruited directly from the communities we serve, and others who are past CLEO program participants.

Additionally, CLEO is viewed by regional governments, organizations, and academic institutions as the go-to credible source for vetted climate science, community justice, and outreach expertise, allowing us to serve in an advisory capacity on initiatives such as climate and health, education, energy justice, and mitigation/adaptation. The deep community relationships weve built in Florida position us as an ally and convener who brings marginalized voices to the forefront of local climate planning and policy development.

CLEOs 13-year track record providing community outreach and climate education includes listening sessions, climate workshops, and town halls; we began these efforts in underserved neighborhoods in Miami, such as Little River, Liberty City, Little Haiti, and Overtown, and have since expanded our reach across the state. In 2023, we reached 18,000 residents across Florida with science-based information through workshops and trainings.

Our recent advocacy work to push for protections for South Floridians from rising temperatures resulted in Florida Power & Light (FPL) changing its policy for disconnecting customers with overdue bills during heat waves. Now, FPL will avoid shutoffs whenever its hotter than 95 degrees outside or if the National Weather Service issues a heat advisory.

In 2022-23, CLEO worked with the City of Tampa to develop their Climate Action & Equity Plan, ensuring vulnerable communities were at the center of planning conversations. The plan was unveiled in June 2023.

Additionally, CLEO trained over 2,000 Students through in-classroom trainings, reached more than 800 teachers, and trained 95 people to be CLEO Climate Speakers.

CLEO also engaged 260 Elected Officials through over 40 advocacy events across Florida and nationwide.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

The CLEO Institute Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The CLEO Institute Inc

Board of directors
as of 01/10/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Daniel Dietch

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/5/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/05/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.