SILVER2022

WOMENS CENTER FOR ADVANCEMENT

Stay safe, grow strong

aka WCA   |   Omaha, NE   |  www.wcaomaha.org

Mission

Assisting victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking and stalking and their children to achieve safety and empowering them to lead self-determined lives.

Ruling year info

2011

President & CEO

Jannette Taylor MOL, MSNDR

Main address

3801 Harney St.

Omaha, NE 68131 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

YWCA Omaha

EIN

27-3205476

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

National statistics show that 1 in 3 women and 1 in 7 men have experienced sexual assault, abuse, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime (CDC, National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, 2010). The frequency of violence in Douglas County reflects national statistics as seen through the over 10,000 hotline calls received, the over 9,000 police reports provided to the WCA, and the 583 hospital calls responded to by advocates at all hours of the day and night. This data clearly indicates that dedicated services for victims of these crimes is a critical need for the Omaha Metro Area.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Safety Services

Safety Services
The WCA’s Safety Services program focuses on the physical and emotional safety of victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. The umbrella of Safety Services encompasses four primary components:
1) Advocacy – The agency’s front line of client intake, advocates are responsible for lethality assessment, immediate safety planning, providing community resources and referrals, and offering ongoing support to clients.
2) Counseling – The Counseling program provides short-term therapy to victims in the immediate aftermath of trauma, as well as ongoing peer-led support groups and psychoeducational classes. In 2017, a new group called “Beyond Trauma” was developed to provide a deeper clinical focus on how to overcome trauma. The group not only takes place at the WCA, but also for incarcerated woman at the Douglas County Corrections facility. The WCA is looking to expand services within the prison system.
3) Legal – The WCA provides victims with legal services related to family law, primarily divorce, child custody, and child support. The Legal team also assists clients with protection orders. In August of 2017, a new model of service was developed with an emphasis on serving more individuals. Under the old model, full representation was the only service offered by the WCA’s legal team. Now, the legal team will provide partial representation, counsel and advice, and a legal clinic twice a month. This has increased the number of individuals receiving legal assistance from the WCA tremendously in the few months since its implementation.
4) Immigration – The WCA’s Department of Justice Representatives help undocumented victims obtain temporary legal standing. The WCA has one of four fully accredited Department of Justice Representatives in the state. A fully accredited Department of Justice Representative is able to represent an individual in all aspects of the immigration process.

Together, these four areas intertwine and overlay to create an overall safety network for clients, many of whom utilize two or more of these services, referred internally by WCA Safety Services staff. The WCA focuses on a holistic approach to care so that those who come to the agency have multiple strategies to keep themselves safe, and are then ready to address additional issues, such as homelessness, financial instability, and unemployment through our Self-Sufficiency programs.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

The WCA’s Self-Sufficiency services move beyond immediate safety to help clients work toward long-term stability, breaking their personal cycle of violence and poverty. Financial abuse is a key element of many domestic violence relationships, making financial literacy and career coaching key elements of getting away from and staying away from one’s abuser. Like the barriers to immediate safety, the WCA also seeks to alleviate these long-term barriers to self-reliance and autonomy.

The Self-Sufficiency program is two-pronged: 1) providing basic financial literacy and life skills important to becoming self-reliant and 2) providing career tools in order to obtain and sustain gainful employment. The program is designed to provide clients with the tools they need to live stable, autonomous lives – addressing a sequence of basic needs that lead to a client’s ability to obtain and sustain housing, employment and financial independence. Specific Self-Sufficiency programs include: individualized case management, the 16 week Getting Ahead cohort, Empowerment classes, and financial literacy.

The careers side of the program includes resume workshops, mock interviews, access to computers for skill building and job hunting, referrals, and career fairs, which are all important elements of the agency’s efforts in preparing clients for employment. In addition, clients have access to the agency’s clothing closet where they can get appropriate attire for interviews and work.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Separate from the direct services offered to clients, but very much entwined in the holistic mission of the WCA, is a robust Prevention and Education Program. As a primary focus of the program, the WCA has a strong presence on local university campuses, particularly Creighton, which utilizes the Green Dot bystander awareness program. The WCA Prevention and Education Manager also regularly provides tailored presentations on a variety of topics related to domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking to community organizations, corporations, small businesses, and schools. The WCA has made prevention and education a focus of its 3-year strategic plan and is looking to enhance and expand programming. These goals include increased outreach to businesses and working to increase youth programming in hope of reaching youth at even younger ages – elementary and middle school – with the idea that ending of the cycle of violence starts with developing a healthy understanding of relationship dynamics at a young age, before negative patterns and behaviors have had the chance to form.

Girls Leadership Academy
Under the umbrella of prevention and education, the WCA also offers the Girls Leadership Academy (GLA), an intensive program specifically aimed at female youth. The WCA created and launched the program in 2011 for 5th/6th grade girls living in multi-generational poverty. Many of the participants have witnessed and/or been affected by domestic violence. With the understanding that changing thoughts and patterns at a young age is the best prevention, GLA aims to empower girls to lead happy, healthy, and purposeful lives through self-reflection, leadership development, and positive relationships with professional women in the community.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Broadly, the WCA seeks to provide a safe, confidential, and trauma-informed environment for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking and stalking seeking help in the Omaha community. The overall goals of the WCA’s programs and services are to enhance the safety and self-sufficiency of those who have been affected by domestic violence and sexual assault and to provide prevention and education strategies that reduce the occurrence of these types of victimization from happening in the first place.

The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act has identified three key factors in effectively promoting the safety of domestic violence victims:
1. Victims who engage with an advocate are safer than those who do not.
2. Victims who have developed a safety plan are safer than those who have not.
3. Victims who have knowledge of community resources are safer than those who do not.

Because of this, the overarching goal of the WCA’s safety services program is to provide victims of domestic violence and sexual assault with tools and strategies to enhance their safety via individualized safety plans and an increased knowledge of community resources. This fundamental strategy guides all areas of the organization’s work.

The desired effect and corresponding strategy for each of the WCA’s primary services are as follows:

1) Advocacy: As the initial entry point for all clients, the primary goal of the advocacy program is to provide every victim seeking services with a customized safety plan and an increased knowledge of community resources, both internally via other WCA programs and externally through community partners. Advocates also provide emotional support and help guide clients throughout their journey.

2) Counseling: The primary goal of the counseling program is to provide clients with strategies to enhance their emotional safety and demonstrate a reduction in severe symptoms (acute symptomology) through short-term crisis counseling (6-8 sessions), peer-led support groups, and psychoeducational classes.

3) Legal: The primary goal of legal services is to help clients achieve legal outcomes that will enhance their safety and independence. This may be helping obtain a protection order or addressing family law issues such as child custody and divorce.

4) Immigration: The primary goal of the immigration program is to assist undocumented victims of domestic violence and sexual assault in applying for temporary legal status via a U-Visa or T-Visa (special visas for victims of violent crime) keeping families safe and together.

5) Self-Sufficiency: The primary goal of the self-sufficiency program is to move clients from financial insecurity, homelessness, and unemployment to long-term self-reliance and stability through individualized case management, life skills training, financial empowerment, career coaching, the career clothing closet, and connections to broader community resources.

6) Prevention and Education: This program works to prevent and eliminate the occurrence of domestic and sexual violence by changing social norms related to healthy relationship dynamics and creating a society-wide intolerance for victimization. Educational presentations/trainings are offered to universities, schools, community partners, law enforcement, medical professionals, businesses, and other types of community groups.

The Women’s Center for Advancement (WCA) is the designated direct service provider for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault (DVSA) in Douglas County. The agency utilizes a wrap-around model that helps those affected by DVSA out of their immediate crisis and into long-term stability. The WCA's continuum of services includes a 24 hour hotline (English and Spanish), advocacy sup-port (lethality assessment, safety planning, resource referral), crisis counseling, peer-led support groups, legal services related to family law, individual self-sufficiency case management, financial empowerment, life skills, career coaching and the career clothing boutique. All services are offered to victims completely free of charge.

2018 year end data provided the following results:
1) 97% of clients agreed or strongly agreed that, after working with a WCA advocate/safety services staff, they had a safety plan in place (ways to plan for safety). This exceeds the expected outcome of at least 80% as listed in the application.
2) 97% of clients agreed or strongly agreed that, after working with a WCA advocate/safety services staff, they had knowledge of appropriate community resources. This, too, exceeds the expected outcome of at least 80% as listed in the application.

Financials

WOMENS CENTER FOR ADVANCEMENT
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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WOMENS CENTER FOR ADVANCEMENT

Board of directors
as of 04/20/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Denise Powell

Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture

Term: 2019 -

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes