PLATINUM2024

Little Angels Service Dogs

"Changing lives...one dog at a time."


Learn how to support this organization

Mission

To maximize the innate ability of dogs to give the gift of independence to individuals regardless of disability or age.

Ruling year info

2011

Executive Director

Katie Gonzalez

Main address

PO BOX 219

Jamul, CA 91935 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-3515067

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2019.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

People living with disabilities are not able to be as independent as their peers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Little Angels Service Dogs

Little Angels Service Dogs is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with an Assistance Dog International (ADI) accreditation. We provide highly trained service dogs to help children and adults living with disabilities to live more independent lives. We live by the motto Changing Lives.One Dog at a Time. Changing lives of individuals living with disabilities is our mission, our passion, and the core reason of why we do what we do.

We specialize in training service dogs for individuals requiring mobility assistance, diabetic alert, seizure alert, hearing alert, psychiatric assistance and autism assistance. It is through these specialties that we are able to service hundreds of individuals to help them live more independently.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Little Angels Service Dogs is forever grateful to have a major prison program as part of our dog training process. We call it our PUPS (Puppies Uplifting Prisoners Spirits) Program. We are thankful for the relationship we have with each of our correctional facilities. Our program would not be as successful as we are without the help of each of these facilities, and the staff and residents within. The residents train our dogs to a capacity that none of us would ever be capable of. We also love to hear the stories from residents about how each of these dogs have touched their lives and given them purpose each day.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
People with disabilities

We reach out into the community to gather volunteer fosters to help train and house our dogs to give them realistic training scenarios. Our fosters receive a private instructional class with each new dog or puppy taken into their care. Most of our dogs graduate as working assistance dogs because they receive a broad range of socialization by living with many different fosters in varying home environments and are able to visit new public locations regularly. Our fosters receive skilled education and continuous support which allows our dogs to be successful.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Veterans

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Assistance Dogs International 2012

International Association of Canine Professionals 2024

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of service dogs trained and placed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Little Angels Service Dogs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number reflects the number of assistance dog teams that are certified for public access. NOTE: 2020 placements were affected by Covid19 and public access restrictions during the pandemic.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our vision is that every individual living with disabilities who needs a service dog is able to obtain a service dog.

At Little Angels we are working to accomplish this by placing service dogs for mobility assistance, autism assistance, hearing assistance, diabetic alert, seizure alert and psychiatric assistance for civilians and veterans.

Little Angels has a deliberate and purposeful process to ensure the highest quality of service dogs that are placed with our recipients:

Step 1: Puppy Whelping and development
Our breeding dogs live with staff or breeding fosters that care for them until it is time to whelp. Litters are whelped at our Breeding and Puppy Development Center in NH or in the homes of fosters. Development training starts within days of birth.

Step 2: Prison and Foster Programs
Between 8-12 weeks our puppies will continue their training in either our prison program or enter one of our foster family homes. In our prison program, our puppies are taught basic commands with some advanced tasks while changing the lives of their inmate trainers. Our foster families focus on socialization in public, basic commands and good manners.

Step 3: Trainers Implement Advanced Tasks
At one year, puppies return to our ranches to get reacquainted with trainers and begin their advanced task training. Here they work toward the ultimate goal of graduating and placement with their disabled recipient.

Step 4: Matched, Placed and Handler Training
Dogs typically finish their training between 18-36 months. Once matched with their disabled recipient, the two become a team and Handler Training begins. During this time, the lifelong bond between the highly trained service dog and their recipient begins and the two start their lives as a working team.

Little Angels has a volunteer base of 47 individuals. By utilizing a collaboration of master trainers and volunteers, we strive to change the lives of the individuals we serve. Little Angels has a strong donor base that expands as more dogs are placed with their recipients.

The demand for service dogs is much greater than the supply. Little Angels has found the key to success is to ensure the placement of highly skilled and qualified service dogs with recipients living with a disability. We specialize in training service dogs for individuals requiring mobility assistance, diabetic alert, seizure alert, hearing alert, psychiatric assistance and autism assistance. It is through these specialties that we are able to service hundreds of individuals to help them live more independently.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Little Angels Service Dogs
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Little Angels Service Dogs

Board of directors
as of 05/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Katie Gonzalez

Stephanie Marlowe

Gary Leventhal

Steve Zurell

Justine Fierman

Janice Hardy

Candy Levy

Linda Liliquist

Christina Rezek

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/4/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/04/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.