VETERANS REBUILDING LIFE

For Veterans by Veterans

aka VRL   |   Astoria, NY   |  https://www.veteransrebuildinglife.org/

Mission

Veterans Rebuilding Life® is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides humanitarian services to veterans and victims of war and disaster. Instead of replicating services already available, VRL targets areas that lack support and provides comprehensive, customizable solutions that have a proven record of success. All contributions made to VRL directly support the mission. No profit is made by our volunteer staff, and all donations are tax-deductible.

Notes from the nonprofit

For veterans, by veterans: VRLNYC.ORG

Ruling year info

2011

Founder, Executive Officer

Mr. Dre Popow

Operations Officer

Major Marikay Satryano Mrs.

Main address

38-01 23rd Avenue, Suite 414,

Astoria, NY 11105 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

VETERANS REBUILDING IRAQ CORP

EIN

27-3586224

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the Dept. of Veteran Affairs OIF/OEF report, the total number of American veteran suicides exceeded the casualty rate in the Global War on Terror. Despite existing programs, the suicide rate increases yearly among young veterans. In fact, as per Stars & Stripes, 29 per 100,000 active-duty troops died by suicide in 2020, up from 26 in 2019 and 25 in 2018. On average, 20 veterans die by suicide every day in the United States. In response to this continuing crisis, VRL's mission remains focused on developing holistic treatment solutions, implemented through a peer-to-peer model developed by combat veterans, designed to target and address the specific needs of this generation's veterans and the families that love them.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

PROJECT 360º

Full Scope Veterans Program:

PHASE 01.
Veteran candidates are assigned a mentor, who provides guidance and support for the duration of the program. Candidates engage in group mediation sessions, to assist military families process the emotional trauma of having a loved-one return from war, as a changed person. Those in-need of PTSD treatment, are provided holistic alternatives to effectively manage their symptoms without reliance on prescription medications.

PHASE 02.
Mentors ascertain the candidates' education and vocational goals. They will assist vets to apply for educational benefits, help identify military-friendly schools, and provide access to accredited training programs. Candidates attend job interviews scheduled through VRL’s network of supporting employers, who offer on-job-training and employment opportunities.

PHASE 03.
Candidates are given the option of volunteering for a humanitarian mission, helping innocent children that were wounded in the crossfire of war. Alternatively, they can choose to become a trained mentor. By recruiting candidates, VRL maintains self-sufficiency with a diverse team of committed members, who not only understand the program’s purpose, but are uniquely capable of achieving it.

MEASURED IMPACT.
Upon completion, candidates participate in a post-evaluation and exit-interview. By documenting milestones and setbacks, the data is utilized to strengthen the program, and provides donors with accurate and credible reporting.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Children and youth
People with disabilities
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people

On October 23rd, 2010, Marine Corporal Juan Dominguez slid down a small embankment during a foot patrol and landed on a buried bomb. The explosion that followed sent a shockwave that was both felt and heard for miles. Both of Juan’s legs were severed right above his knee and his right arm was mangled, the bones shattered in several places.

Juan’s body went into shock and put him into a coma, as fellow Marines from his platoon raced to save his life. A dust-off (helicopter medical evacuation team) flew Juan to safety. When he awoke in the medical tent, Juan said "The Taliban failed, I survived.” But he did far more than just survive. After sustaining catastrophic injuries and undergoing multiple complex surgeries, Juan’s determination is an inspiration to his fellow injured servicemen and women.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Children and youth

Brendan Marrocco entered the U.S. Army in 2008 at the age of 21. On Easter Sunday, Brendan’s vehicle sustained a direct hit by an explosive-fired projectile. One soldier was killed and two others seriously injured. Brendan became the first veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to lose both arms and legs, and live. VRL hosted the Cars and Cocktails Event in Bedford, NY.

The event successfully raised thousands of dollars to be placed in the Brendan Marrocco Trust, to be used in the construction of a spec-house in his native home of Staten Island, NY. VRL also participated in the Tunnels to Towers annual event, in support of Brendan. 100% of the donations raised by VRL directly aided in the building of a new home for Brendan, completed in the summer of 2013.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel

Corporal Todd Nicely, a native of Arnold, Missouri found his calling as a mentor for junior Marines. At the ripe old age of 26, he earned the title of "Old Man Marine.” Todd met his wife, Crystal, also a Marine, at the age of 24. The couple were stationed at different bases, but within proximity of one another in North Carolina. They married on February 20, 2009 in Jacksonville, North Carolina. Todd had already served a tour of duty in Iraq in 2008 before re-deploying to Afghanistan in 2009, where he was directly responsible for the lives of 12 junior Marines in 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines.

Corporal Nicely was leading 1st Squad back from a security patrol when he stepped on a pressure-activated land mine. After receiving emergency medical help from his platoon and a medic in a nearby platoon, Nicely was transported to the military hospital in Landstuhl, Germany and then flown to Washington, DC to Walter Reed’s Military Advanced Training Center, where amputees get physical and occupational therapy.

Todd had lost all his limbs on that battlefield. His recovery depended on spirit and grueling therapy. Amazingly, dramatic improvement followed, to the extent that he even mastered to drive a specially equipped automobile! Todd’s comment regarding his condition would humble any of us: "I consider myself pretty lucky. I wake up every morning and figure I have a second chance at life, so I get up and go.”

Todd and Crystal Nicely have learned together what it means to embody the Marine motto, Semper Fidelis. In a recent interview, Crystal mentioned how blessed she feels when she thinks of growing old with Todd and watching their grandchildren together. VRL was honored to participate in the 2011 Tunnels to Towers Fundraising event to raise the cost of construction to build Todd and Crystal’s new spec–home by a lake in the Ozarks, Missouri. A home that represents our gratitude for their sacrifice.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel

Yousif’s leg was crushed by shrapnel in the war-torn nation of Iraq. He had endured multiple surgeries in what’s left of Iraq’s medical infrastructure. Because of limited supplies and personnel, Yousif’s surgeries were unsuccessful and left his legs uneven, making it extremely difficult and painful to walk. As he grew, so would do his medical problems. Left untreated, he would have lost his leg by age twelve after suffering years of chronic pain with every step.

Yousif’s story is all too common in today’s Iraq, where violence has increased since the U.S. withdrawal of military forces. The life expectancy of Iraq’s children has dramatically declined in recent years, according to the BBC world news report. Iraq’s adult population was decimated after ten years of war. Children now make up 56% of Iraq’s total population of 33 million.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Victims and oppressed people

A five-year-old boy from the plains of Nineveh, Iraq was diagnosed with congenital heart disease. He was brought to Amman, Jordan through VRL’s joint humanitarian partnerships, and the University of Indiana's: Pediatric Cardiac Team. A thorough medical evaluation was completed in Amman, by VRL partner: Dr. Salaymeh, MD, who determined that the medical defect required an emergency open-heart surgical procedure. The patient underwent a complex but successful medical surgery. David recovered in Amman for the following week, before departing home to his grateful family.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Victims and oppressed people

Mahaba Has Three Strikes Against Her: 1) She’s Kurdish, which means she was persecuted under Saddam Hussein’s regime. 2) She’s a girl and as such, of secondary importance within the regime. 3) Her severe spine curvature has progressed beyond the medical capabilities of a war-ravaged Iraq. Three strikes for Mahhaba.

Her condition was labeled progressive, meaning her spine curvature would continue to increase until the physical constriction made it impossible for her to breathe. Like any family, Mahaba’s mother and father refused to accept the death of their child. Despite the language barrier and lack of resources, they made contact with VRL. With help from our friends at the Shriners Hospital for Children, medical costs would be taken care of, leaving only the cost of travel for Mahaba to get to the hospital.

The $2,400 travel expense was a blow to the family, as they lived in one of the poorest war–torn regions of Iraq. But thanks to donations provided by VRL members, Mahaba’s travel costs were successfully met on time for her surgery, which was performed successfully on March 12, 2012.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Victims and oppressed people

OPERATION: TABAREK

The undersupplied medical staff of war–torn Iraq were unable to treat Tabarek’s leg properly, leading to an infection that could turn lethal if not treated.

Eight–year–old Tabarek entered the hospital dragging her leg through the hallways of the children’s surgery wing. She was the victim of the Iraq War, caught in the crossfire of combat. Tabarek underwent two surgeries to remove a cyst, followed by a bone-graft to enhance the healing. The operations failed. Tabarek developed a condition called pseudo arthrosis, which left her unable to walk. VRL’s partner, The Shriners at Boston Children’s Hospital, agreed to waive the medical cost of treating her, provided VRL would pay for Tabarek’s travel expenses from Iraq to the United States. VRL requested photos of Tabarek in order to develop an online advertising campaign to cover the cost of her travel expenses. For every contribution over $25.00 we offered donors a VRL T-shirt and dog-tag necklace. Working around the clock, we made the deadline, exceeding our goal of $2,500.00 to $2,650.00.

Tabarek received her round–trip ticket, making it possible to undergo the multiple surgeries that led to a successful recovery. Seen above is Tabarek just days after her final operation, is capable of walking with the assistance of a temporary medical boot. Seen here with representatives from the Shriners Children Hospital, a VRL humanitarian partnership that is responsible for providing the medical facility to successfully complete Tabarek’s surgery. On August 27th, 2010, she returned home with her grandmother, where they were received by a grateful family. Tabarek was VRL’s first humanitarian project and led to the development of VRL’s One Mission–One Life strategy utilized today.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Victims and oppressed people

On the morning of January 10th, 2018, Mrs. Jum Sim Yim, the loving mother of a Marine Corps veteran, was tragically killed by a reckless driver in a shocking hit-and-run as she was returning home from morning church services in Queens, NY. She was seventy-seven years of age. A devoted mother and grandmother, Mrs. Yim was known for her profound daily commitment and service to her spiritual faith, church, community, and family.
-
The brutal injustice of her abrupt passing left her loved-ones devastated by grief, and burdened with loss. Mrs. Yim was survived by her three children, including her youngest son: Jae Yim, a Marine Corps veteran of the Iraq War, who later re-enlisted as a member of the Army National Guard, 10th Mountain Division located in New York City. Dedicated to a life of service, Jae is employed as an Emergency Medical Technician, (EMT) for the Fire Department of New York, (FDNY).

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Victims and oppressed people

Her parents gave her this name because they wanted to provide happiness and hoped for love in return. But fate gave her a congenital defect that became a mechanically faulty heart. As if this were not enough, Marah was born in a refugee camp in Jordan, in a tiny room illuminated by a single light bulb, a one-burner gas stove for cooking, no furniture, no heat, and very little to hope for in a region crowded with refugees. “An operation?” asked her father incredulously, Marah’s family had spent more than a year in that room. Every morning, the father routinely went looking for work, knowing there was none.

A volunteer medical physician examined Marah, and made the determination that the complexities involved in her case, were well beyond the medical capabilities of the camp’s clinic. However, Marah’s diagnosis was positive, provided she underwent surgery as soon as possible. And that was the fortuitous day when they contacted us.

We visited the family, decided to act, and went looking for funds. Soon we had managed to get transport and food, and then a hospital and a surgeon who volunteered his services. Marah’s operation was successful and the photo shows her getting a follow-up echocardiogram soon after. Today, Marah is ten years old. Both she and her family are joyful.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with physical disabilities

Where we work

Accreditations

Emergency First Aid, AED, EPI, Staff Training Certifications 2020

Workplace Safety Staff Training Certifications 2020

Adult and Infant CPR Staff Training Certifications 2019

Military Family Mediation Training Certifications 2016

Licensed Automotive Insurance Adjuster Training Certifications 2022

Awards

Top-Rated Nonprofit Award 2021

Great Nonprofits

Veterans Hall of Fame Award 2019

New York State Senate

Top-Rated Nonprofit Award 2019

Great Nonprofits

Community Impact Award 2018

Times Ledger

Top-Rated Nonprofit Award 2018

Great Nonprofits

Conspicuous Service Star 2017

NYS State Governors Office

State Medal of Merit 2016

Office of the Adjunct General

Top-Rated Nonprofit Award 2017

Great Nonprofits

Top-Rated Nonprofit Award 2020

Great nonprofits

Top-Rated Nonprofit Award 2022

Great nonprofits

Affiliations & memberships

American Red Cross 2020

Occupational Safety and Health Administration 2020

American Heart Association 2019

Community Mediation Center 2016

New York State Senate 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

SERVICES: education/healthcare registration, accredited training, employment, peer mentorship, family mediation, legal support, counseling, disaster relief. NOTE: 2020 increase due to pandemic-mission

Number of clients still working after 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Those in-need of developing professional skills, select from a variety of state-approved trainings, that lead to professional certifications upon completion. (2020 numbers reflect COVID-19 pandemic)

Number of computer literacy/skills/technology courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people, People with disabilities

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

FY2021-2022 Metric for Quarters 1&2. Continued development of community partnerships with local businesses increases training and employment opportunities annually.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

VRL's network of supporting employers provide on-job training, and full-time employment opportunities at living-wage standards, to all program graduates. (2020 N/A due to COVID-19 pandemic

Number of clients who have access to insurance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

VRL partners with law firms who provide administrative and legal services, to secure healthcare benefits for clients in-need of insurance.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people, People with disabilities

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

VRL operates with an all-volunteer staff. No salaries are paid to any member of the organization. (Note: 2020 uptick in volunteer-hours due to COVID-19 Pandemic)

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Trainings Include: Digital Resume Development, Microsoft & Adobe Software Courses, OSHA-10 & OSHA-30 Certifications, Red Cross First-Aid, CPR, AED Training, ESL Tutoring.

Number of employer partners offering jobs to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Employers seeking to hire veterans through VRL must be capable of providing full-time employment positions at living-wage standards, with room for professional growth.

Number of clients still enrolled after the first week of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Metric analysis indicates retention increase is the result of increased training options, provided through new community partnerships. (2020 N/A due to COVID-19 pandemic)

Average hourly wage of clients who became employed after job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All VRL supporting employers must provide on-job-training services, that will lead to employment opportunities at a living wage, in accordance with the cost-of-living for NYS.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

VRL mentors register vets for education benefits, identify military friendly schools & provide access to trainings where they utilize online platforms to expand their professional network capacity.

Hours of mentoring

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

VRL utilizes a mentorship approach that targets the mental and emotional factors, having the highest impact on successful transitions from military to civilian life.

Number of veterans with PTSD served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, People with disabilities, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

PROJECT 360º

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Veterans medically diagnosed with service related PTSD symptoms are the target demographic assisted by the organization.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

VRL aims to decrease the number of veteran suicides and lessen the harms of war by filling the gaps in existing support services. We first identify the specific concerns of each veteran and then provide individualized support services that address their needs for health, security, and purpose/meaning.

These services include holistic PTSD treatment, family mediation & counseling, certified training courses relevant to the current job market, registration support for education and healthcare benefits, full-time employment opportunities that pay living wages, legal services for victims of predatory practices, and community service/ humanitarian medical missions that engage veterans in their local communities and help them to create meaning after service.

These direct-impact solutions are provided by fellow veterans using a peer-to-peer model and focus on using holistic treatment alternatives instead of prescription medication. To learn more about this evidence-based approach, visit www.VeteransRebuildingLife.org.

VETERAN PROJECTS:

Pro Bono mediation services for military families struggling with the emotional and reintegration difficulties that returning veterans face. Fellow veterans - professionally trained to assist families in setting tangible goals and achieving measurable outcomes-provide all direct services.

Legal services are provided to veterans fighting to receive healthcare and GI–Bill educational benefits.

Administrative assistance for those seeking employment, assisting vets with job placement through VRL's network of supporting employers.

Individualized tutoring services are provided to vets using their education benefits.

Fundraisers are supporting the development of intelligent homes designed to address the medical needs of disabled American veterans through partnerships with organizations that share VRL's mission focus.

CHILD PROJECTS:

In addition to veteran services, VRL assists the child victims of war by providing the cost of transportation for innocent children who need life-saving surgeries that are unavailable overseas.

Child patients are security screened before acceptance for care and transported from their home to the U.S., where volunteer medical staff will address the patient's needs.

VRL secures temp-housing for the child patients for the duration of the medical procedure.

All child patients return home upon completion of their procedure.

Veterans Rebuilding Life has shown steady increases in all growth areas since our inception. In 2011, VRL comprised three members hoping to accomplish a single humanitarian mission. Today, Veterans Rebuilding Life has a board of directors and advisers, a team of project managers, and essential volunteers. They all play a role in the success of the ongoing child and veteran missions we accomplish. 100% of all donations directly support this humanitarian mission.

MEASURED IMPACT
VRL maintains an organized project archive that provides details on each veteran and patient we help, including patient status reports updated as they become available. This archive is available online at www.VeteransRebuildingLife.org.

24/7 AVAILABILITY
VRL provides individual donors with a direct contact line available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for donors to call with any questions or concerns they have regarding the specific patient or veteran that their donation went to help.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The mission of Veterans Rebuilding Life has a dual objective: 1. To help the victims of war to rebuild their lives. This includes innocent children and disabled veterans that have been injured by global conflict. 2. Respond to humanitarian crises by providing emergency support services, and direct-aid to communities in crisis.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Client exit interviews are documented to ensure all concerns have been properly addressed.,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Veterans Rebuilding Life encourages the communities we serve, to provide critical feedback on every aspect of the support services we provide. This unfiltered feedback is utilized to strategically revise all existing programs and services.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By maintaining open lines of communication with the communities Veterans Rebuilding Life serves, we not only receive the feedback necessary to improve our programs and services, we also develop long term partnerships with those we serve. These partnerships create opportunities to recruit volunteers, and expand our support network to include local businesses and community centers, seeking to collaborate on projects that are beneficial to the community as a whole.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

VETERANS REBUILDING LIFE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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VETERANS REBUILDING LIFE

Board of directors
as of 11/15/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Christian Zamora

Veterans Rebuilding Life

Term: 2011 -


Board co-chair

Ms. Damia December

Veterans Rebuilding Life

Term: 2018 -

Marikay Satryano

Veterans Rebuilding Life

Christian Zamora

Veterans Rebuilding Life

Gerald Koval

Veterans Rebuilding Life

Damia December

Veterans Rebuilding Life

William Vallely

Veterans Rebuilding Life

Natasha Ryder

Veterans Rebuilding Life

George Hlynsky

Veterans Rebuilding Life

Louis Costa

Veterans Rebuilding Life

Muna Fadhil

Veterans Rebuilding Life

Vanessa Janes

Veterans Rebuilding Life

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/15/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/15/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.