AFRICAN MISSION HEALTHCARE

Life-Changing Medical Care for the Hurting & Forgotten

Pueblo, CA   |  www.africanmissionhealthcare.org

Mission

At AMH, we envision an African continent filled with enduring & improving health systems where everyone has access to quality, compassionate healthcare. Our Mission is to strengthen African mission hospitals to aid those in greatest need.

Notes from the nonprofit

Medical missionary, Dr. Jon Fielder, co-founded AMH in 2010 with good friend Mark Gerson, a Jewish entrepreneur, investor and philanthropist who saw the incredible value of Christian medical missionaries and mission hospitals. The two had collaborated to improve health care for the African poor since Jon completed training at Johns Hopkins Hospital and first went to Africa in 2002. Mark, his wife Erica, and Jon perceived that filling the gap and investing in medical missionaries and mission hospitals in Africa would further their goal of substantial change to the quality of lives through improved access to quality, compassionate healthcare. This led them to launch African Mission Healthcare. Since formation, AMH has invested more than $30 million in training, clinical care, and infrastructure projects with more than 45 mission hospital partners. These investments have supported direct care for more than 670,000 patients.

Ruling year info

2011

Co-Founder & Chief Executive

Dr. Jon Fielder M.D.

Main address

PO BOX 8598

Pueblo, CA 81008-9589 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-3663856

NTEE code info

International Relief (Q33)

Hospitals and Primary Medical Care Facilities (E20)

Rehabilitative Medical Services (E50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Tanzania pediatric surgery

Support for curative and rehabilitative surgery at Arusha Lutheran Medical Center in Tanzania. Children with disabilities, injuries, and congenital abnormalities receive free surgical and rehabilitative care.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Tanzania only has one doctor per 100,000 people. Rural areas lack adequate health providers. The Assistant Medical Officer training program at Arusha Lutheran Medical Center upgrades the skills of physician assstants to become junior doctors.

Population(s) Served
Adults

HIV care is a rapidly changing and sophisticated field. Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death among those with HIV in Africa. Most training programs only focus on lectures. The clinical mentorship program operated by Hospital Support Organization (Kenya) places learners in the clinic to acquire skills.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Safe surgery requires safe anesthesia. By 2012, South Sudan only had four trained anesthetists in the entire country. In conjunction with Kijabe Hospital, Kenya, AMH sponsors South Sudanese nurses to train in safe anesthesia at a noted mission hospital.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Malawi has a high rate of HIV infection. Partners in Hope is one of the largest providers of HIV/AIDS care in the country. AMH provides support for staff, community outreach, medicines, and supplies.

Population(s) Served
Families

Malawi has few quality rural health clinics. Poverty means it is nearly impossible to provide care based only on patient fees. Katawa Clinic is a program of Kindle Orphan Outreach, located near Lake Malawi. The compassionate staff and adequate medicine supply mean patients travel from up to 100 kilometers away for primary care, malaria treatment, and HIV care.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Excellence in Giving 2020

Awards

The Aurora Prize for Awakening Humanity with Dr. Tom Catena 2017

Aurora Humanitarian Initiative

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of patient visits supported annually

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes direct funding to sites to support clinical operations, and visits made possible by supporting infrastructure.

African healthcare workers supported in degree-granting programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with diseases and illnesses

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Includes sponsorship of surgeons, doctors, nurses, physician assistants, HIV care providers, anesthetists, lab and pharmacy workers.

Number of corrective procedures supported

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

General surgeries, pediatric surgeries, cataract removal, clubfeet repaired

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

African Mission Healthcare (AMH) strengthens African mission hospitals to serve people in greatest need. While Christian medical missionaries and mission hospitals in Africa have proven very effective, support from their traditional sources has been waning. These Christian missionary physicians commit their entire careers towards treating patients, training African colleagues, creating systems and building institutions in very difficult conditions throughout sub-Saharan Africa. They routinely do what their colleagues in the United States regard as impossible when they learn about it. We believe that they provide an excellent foundation to build upon and warrant more support and investment. AMH provides them with much-needed resources, enabling these missionary physicians, their African colleagues, and the mission hospitals they serve, to provide quality and compassionate care for the African poor.

We take a proven approach that is effectively tailored to the African context. We believe that our approach is unique. We don’t offer a standard, easily repeatable solution; we spend time and resources identifying what is truly needed. AMH invests with trusted hospital partners, measuring the return in lives saved and changed.

We carefully select the hospitals with which we work, spend the time to understand and build relationships, and truly partner—not prescribing answers but together developing solutions. And we make decisions leveraging five distinctive values that maximize our impact in the African context:

We Listen: Guided by our mission hospital partners, we take the time to understand what’s needed and bring together resources to get the work done;
We’re Hands On: We work alongside our mission hospital partners, rolling up our sleeves to help provide life-changing care;
We Train: We multiply our impact by promoting leadership and developing the next generation of African healthcare professionals;
We See It Through: We address urgent needs while remaining committed to improving health systems for the long haul; and
We Get Results: We hold ourselves accountable to make decisions that transform lives every day and achieve lasting impact.

AMH Executive Director and co-founder Dr. Jon Fielder has served as a medical missionary in Kenya and Malawi since 2002. His clinical practice has included adult and pediatric medicine, consultation to surgeons, and oversight of HIV and tuberculosis care programs. He has traveled widely to teach. AMH VP of Operations Dr. Jonathan Mwiindi has a background in pharmacy, health program management, and public health. He was instrumental to the scale-up of HIV care in Kenya through the mission health sector. Together, Dr. Fielder and Mr. Mwiindi have two decades of experience within the African mission health sector. Scott Marcello currently serves as the President of African Mission Healthcare. He first met Dr. Jon Fielder, AMH Chief Executive and Co-founder, in 2006 and Jonathan Mwiindi, AMH Executive Vice President, in 2007 while they were both serving at Kijabe Hospital in Kenya. This began a long-term relationship which led to Scott joining the AMH Board in 2011 and, ultimately, joining the leadership team.AMH's programs in sub-Saharan Africa are supported in collaboration with African Mission Healthcare-Kenya, an audited implementing and monitoring non-governmental organization which also works closely with the faith-based health sector.

At AMH we believe that mission hospitals are a very important part of the solution in Africa.
African mission hospitals are well-positioned to improve clinical health systems on the continent. They already provide one-third of the medical care in sub-Saharan Africa and arguably a higher percentage of quality medical care. They are also training centers, producing qualified nurses, physician assistants and, increasingly, doctors and specialists. Mission hospitals have long, deep roots in the local communities they serve, having survived wars, famine, epidemics, and poverty—earning the trust of the people in those communities.

As investors, we choose our partners and investments carefully and then we cultivate and monitor progress to help them reach their full potential. Of course, we’re not looking for a financial return. Our goal is the sustainable ability to change lives through improved access to quality, compassionate healthcare.

Since AMH’s inception, we have worked with more than 35 mission hospital partners across 16 countries in Suh-Saharan Africa. Today we have active projects in 10 of these countries.

AMH provides support for hospitals and medical clinics in the Sub-Saharan region of Africa. It provides grants to multiple hospitals in the region to directly support clinical care and help with medical supplies, equipment and infrastructure, and medical education. In 2020, AMH made investments that will make possible more than 2,012,690 life-time patient visits and approximately 110,000 direct patient visits over the twelve-month period. AMH also enabled approximately 3,990 surgical and corrective procedures.

AMH's selected investments in equipment and infrastructure during 2020 included continued construction of the Cardiothoracic Center and related projects at Tenwek Hospital (Kenya), renovation and construction of a medical education building at Kijabe Hosptal (Kenya), major renovations at Maua Methodist Hospital (Kenya), training faculty housing at Nkhoma Hospital (Malawi), housing for medical residents (clinical trainees) at Kibuye Hope Hospital (Burundi), construction of a pediatric ward at Rwibaale medical center (Uganda), and continued electrical upgrades at Bongolo Hospital (Gabon). Our direct investments in clinical care and supplies involved 23 discrete projects at 19 different clinical partners in seven countries.

AMH also enabled training for 10,911 healthcare workers across 13 different course offerings. During 2020, AMH launched a new on-line platform to enable training tailored for African Clinical Officers (“COs”), who are medical professionals similar to Physician Assistants in the United States; this platform enables COs to receive credit for continuing professional education and also enabled extensive trainings despite the impacts of COVID-19.

AMH provides direct sponsorship for selected surgeries under its "Surgical Access For Everyone" (SAFE) program; these surgeries were conducted at hospital partners in Kenya, Tanzania, Ugandan, Ethiopia, Burundi, South Sudan, and Malawi. These surgical sponsorships not only directly assist the individual patients, but also reward the hospitals for performing quality surgery, enable important training and experience for surgical staff and residents, allow the hospitals to support their investments in expanded equipment and capacity, and promote overall quality at the facility. During 2020, the SAFE program made possible 2,021 surgeries at 12 hospital partners.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    As investors, we choose our partners and investments carefully and then we cultivate and monitor progress to help them reach their full potential. Of course, we’re not looking for a financial return. Our goal is the sustainable ability to change lives through improved access to quality, compassionate healthcare. Since AMH’s inception, we have worked with more than 35 mission hospital partners across 16 countries in Suh-Saharan Africa. Today we have active projects in 10 of these countries. We have provided over $13,000 surgical and corrective procedures to people in need in sub-Saharan Africa.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Based upon monitoring and evaluation follow ups done in Uganda with our Partner Hospitals and patients treated. We noted that many mothers in the community were suffering from birth injuries. Based upon these evaluations, AMH along with our Ugandan Hospital Partners funded several birth injury camps. The use of birth injury surgeries verses urine or stool incontinence had a positive impact on the women in the community and encouraged them to seek help. This wording help eliminate any stigma associated with receiving assistance.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

AFRICAN MISSION HEALTHCARE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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AFRICAN MISSION HEALTHCARE

Board of directors
as of 10/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mark Gerson

Jon Fielder

African Mission Healthcare

Jenna Arnold

Sean Fieler

Equinox Partners

Rabbi Erica Gerson

Aaron Greenblatt

G&W Laboratories

Pavi Thomas

Lead Pastor of Heritage Christian Church

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/01/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.