Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and Grantmaking

FOUNDATION FOR EXCELLENCE IN MENTAL HEALTH CARE, INC

Expect Recovery. Hope Matters.

aka OPEN EXCELLENCE

Wilsonville, OR

Mission

Open Excellence is the next generation community foundation; global in scope and focused exclusively on improving mental health outcomes. With a strong, diverse board of eminent researchers, people with lived experience, philanthropists and finance managers and an intellectually rich Scientific Advisory Council, Open Excellence gives donors large and small the opportunity to make an impact by supporting recovery-oriented research, developing family and community education resources that spread hope and knowledge about recovery practices, and by supporting professional symposia and learning collaboratives that will begin to shift the field’s mindset from the chronic disease model to one that expects recovery for every person with mental health challenges.

Notes from the Nonprofit

We aim to change the current standard of care in mental health. We lead with a world renowned scientific advisory committee and people with lived experience who inform us "what works and what doesn't work". One size doesn't fit all in treatment. We want to give people all the tools we have in the world. We do expect recovery!

Ruling Year

2011

Interim President & CEO

Jessica S Pratt

Board Chair

Dr. Sandra Steingard MD

Main Address

8532 St. Helens Drive Suite 250

Wilsonville, OR 97070 USA

Keywords

mental health, recovery, paradigm shift, innovative, person centered

EIN

27-4682873

 Number

1536784403

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Community Foundations (T31)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (F12)

Patients' Rights (R27)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Blog

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Adapting the Open Dialogue Model in the United States

Hearing Voices Training and Support

Nutrition and Mental Health Research Fund

Learning and Self-development Collaborative

Long term outcomes of psychotropic medications research

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of media citations of advocate research or products

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of grants awarded

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of donations made by board members

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new donors

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Our vision is to radically improve outcomes for people with mental health challenges. We are transforming the current medical model of care to a recovery-based model of care that institutes trauma-informed care practices, informed consent, person-centered choice, less reliance on medication, and more helpful and hopeful tools for recovery.

Former NIMH Director Tom Insel recently said, "I spent 13 years at NIMH really pushing on the neuroscience and genetics of mental disorders, and when I look back on that I realize that while I think I succeeded at getting lots of really cool papers published by cool scientists at fairly large costs—I think $20 billion—I don't think we moved the needle in reducing suicide, reducing hospitalizations, improving recovery for the tens of millions of people who have mental illness."

To move the needle, the Foundation for Excellence in Mental Health Care is funding clinical research and piloting recovery programs that are already helping people today, with preliminary data showing improved outcomes. These focus on neglected areas of research such as the side-effects of long-term use of medication, nutrition and metabolic disorders that cause psychiatric symptoms, and treatment supports such as Open Dialogue and Hearing Voices support groups.

By funding clinical research, piloting recovery models of care and sharing unbiased information through educational symposiums, we will achieve a fact based system of care that allows people to make well informed choices for their treatment.

We accomplish this by connecting donors to the causes that they find most meaningful through our worldwide network of researchers.

The Foundation has a community of dedicated donors who come from all walks of life but are united by a common vision and passion. We partner them with world renowned researchers, who together with our staff, international Board of Directors and Scientific Advisory Council members advance the mission of the Foundation. These include pioneering thought leaders from institutions such as the University of Massachusetts Medical School, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Emory School of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and UC San Diego Medical School, to name a few. These researchers and board members include people who have lived through and with many different mental health challenges and this first-hand expertise informs every aspect of the work of the Foundation.

Through our donor-advised funds and professional relationships, we have an extensive fabric of international relationships established over decades from which to draw further expertise and assistance.

The staff, consisting of our CEO Gina Nikkel, PhD, Chief Administrative Officer Malea Vedack, Data & Communications Manager Jessica Pratt and Chief Development Officer Yana Jacobs orchestrate the smooth operation of financial stewardship, grant giving, monitoring, and effective communication.

We make progress with each doctor who prescribes medications cautiously and with all of the information needed to mitigate the risks of side effects and drug interactions. We make progress with each person who successfully takes the lead in choosing and navigating their preferred treatment and with each life and family that is restored to wellness.

We are blessed to hear from some of those people all the time, but they are difficult to measure. As a proxy, we keep a count of our growing social media community, the number of successful recovery-oriented grants that have been completed and published in a peer-reviewed journal; the number of persons with lived experience who advocate and support our work; the number of media articles reflecting an understanding of the risks of psychotropic drugs, the importance of truly informed consent and the range of holistic recovery tools that help people recover and thrive; number of Foundation advocate or spokesperson citations in the media; and the number of media citations of advocate research or products.

Progress is being measured by a combination of seeing our donor pool grow which will enable us to expand new research, and implement new model programs. We also measure progress by the increased inquiries to our website and the feedback that people are deeply grateful for the work we are doing.

Finally, we will be able to objectively assess progress towards improving the mental health community through philanthropy by examining various measures including the number of donor advised funds we manage, and the annual dollar amount we are able to grant to nonprofits.

Consistent communication and data will be key, but also constant communications from stakeholders, people with lived experience, their family members and providers, their input is vital to know if we are making progress in our initiatives.

We are making progress in the following key areas: research, education and innovative program implementation. We have funded research which has been published in peer-reviewed journals, we have on-going research taking place currently in the areas of nutrition and multi-nutrients, long-term use of psychotropic drugs and the efficacy of Open Dialogue and Hearing Voices groups.

We partner with educational programs that offer family member support and continuing professional education. We have implemented a model treatment program which is now being replicated in three states, “Open Dialogue".

We have developed an online provider directory for the public to access when seeking providers who share our mission and are committed to providing psycho-social treatment. We have grown our social media community which helps to share important news and education. We receive feedback weekly that what we are doing is on track with what professionals and public are seeking.

We are still working to achieve a large enough donor base to assure sustainability for many years to come in order for us to truly accomplish our mission of changing and improving mental health care.

External Reviews

Financials

FOUNDATION FOR EXCELLENCE IN MENTAL HEALTH CARE, INC

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity
Diversity notes from the nonprofit
While we don't track gender identity, race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, and disability status specifically at the current time our board has had discussions about bringing a diverse set of people onto our board and staffing as we grow.