Animal related

GIVE A DOG A HOME GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG RESCUE

Saving Those that would Otherwise be KILLED!

aka Give a Dog a Home, German Shepherd Dog Rescue   |   Sebec, ME   |  www.giveadogahome-sanantonio.org

Mission

Give a Dog a Home, German Shepherd Dog Rescue (GaDaH) is a volunteer based 501c3 non-profit organization who are 100% committed to saving the lives of German Shepherds and other breeds all of size ranges from Kill Shelters throughout the State of Texas. GaDaH volunteers go to great lengths to find the perfect families who understand and are able to provide both the mental and physical needs of the German Shepherd Dog. We have expanded our rescue to save all other breeds. All of our dogs are fully vetted before they are adopted.

Ruling year info

2015

President / Founder

Ms. jenny Cope

Main address

187 Downs road

Sebec, ME 04481 USA

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Formerly known as

Give a Dog a Home - San Antonio

EIN

27-5241306

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the ASPSA each year around 7.6 million dogs and cats enter animal shelters as unwanted or homeless pets. The humane Society of the United States (hsus.org) claims almost 3 million dogs and cats are euthanized each year, 80% of those healthy animals, equating to every 13 seconds an animal is killed. Homeless animals not only causes distress to those in the heavily populated communities, but potential danger from dogs forming packs, diseases from unhealthy, untreated animals and injury from vehicle accidents, hitting or swerving to miss an animal. The financial impact on the government sheltes, that burden the tax payers is constant as animals have to be housed, vetted, cared for and if homes, rescue's or fosters are not found, then euthanized and disposed of. According to according to USA Today, “it costs U.S. taxpayers approximately $2 billion each year to round up, house, kill and dispose of homeless animals.”

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Foster to Train

Give a Dog a Home, German Shepherd dog rescue has a partnership with Shepherds for Lost Sheep Inc., a non profit organization ran be veterans who have their own service dogs and train dogs to be service dogs for their fellow veterans.

We have currently started a "Foster to Train" program where we look for volunteers to take one or our assessed rescue's and to start working on basic training and taking the dog to as many places and environments as possible, giving maximum exposure.

An agreed standard is made and once at this level the dog will transfer into the Shepherds for Lost Sheep Inc. program, where the trainers will complete the training and veteran / dog training.

This does many things:

Takes a dog out of the rescue, which free's up space to allow the rescue to save another dog from a kill shelter.

Allows Shepherds for Lost Sheep to have other dogs being trained, to a high standard so when they get the dog it will only require a short amount of advanced and veteran/dog training, thus allowing them to put more dogs through their program.

Veterans will get their service dogs quicker, as Shepherds for Lost Sheep are able to process the dogs through the program quicker.

Families take great pride in knowing that they are making a difference to a veteran and their families lives.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

We are currently in the process of setting up a community Pet Food Bank to distribute pet food to the families in the community and rural areas that are unable to properly feed their pets.

By working this program, we hope to enable families to keep their pets that they might otherwise turn into a kill shelter, or abandon them in the community adding to the already stray animal population.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$3,000

The Be a Tree program is a dog bite prevention seminar program for school-age children. This program focuses on fun and interactive activities to teach children how to read dog body language and how to act safely around both their own dog and strange dogs.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Infants to preschool (under age 5)

Our ultimate program is that of finding homes for the dogs that we save from the kill shelters in the south.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Related Program

Dog Adoption

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of animals surrendered by their owner

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

To continue to save lives! Saving dogs from the South and bringing them to the rescue in the North where the stray population is minimal and educating people on the problems in the south states To gather support, not just through adoptions, but foster programs and commnuity program outreach. By continuing to work with these high kill shelters, supporting spay/neuter programs and through education we hope to bring awareness to the increasing problem of over-populated animals, to advise on the many spay/neuter and wellness programs that are offered.

We have a physical shelter where between 30-40 dogs can be housed, we have several communal areas throughout the property to house younger and socialized dogs and we facilitate foster families. We promote our dogs for adoption through the rescue website, social media and several adoption sites, including PetFinder and Adopt-a-Pet. We post our fully vetted, healthy adoptable dogs throughout the east coast states and neighbouring Canadian states where families travel to come and meet the dogs prior to adoption. We take in owner surrender dogs from families who are no longer able to care for their pets after working to see if there is a way we can support them, lessening the stress and burden on them. We promote through social media and through community events our rescue, our services and promote and educate about the importance of basic animal care, wellness exams, spay/neuter and vaccination and prevention medications.

In February 2021 we will be celebrating out 10 year anniversary, and can every day look back on what we ourselves have learnt, how we have adapted our rescue to accommodate the needs of the homeless and unwanted animals. We feel our experience and ability to adapt is crucial. We have dedicated volunteers not only in Texas where we save our dogs from and in Maine where the rescue is located, but throughout the US who support, donate and follow us on social media. We have a strong physical and online team who are fully commited to doing what is needed to help ensure that we provide the best care for the animals that we save. We work closely with the local veterinarian to ensure the best care is given to any pets that have ongoing medical needs, surgery requirements or assessment. We have a good relationship with the local animal control and also the State of Maine Animal Welfare division and have helped out when needed to house stray or abused animals. We attend local and state adoption and community events, participate in parades and are increasing our community presence to ensure people are aware of who we are, why we do what we do and how people can become involved.

Our progress is assessed by the numbers of lives we save, adoptions and other intakes and outcomes. We operate our own database which we can run specific reports to allow us to review our achievements and ensure we are making progress. We also contribute our numbers to the Shelter Animals Count, which is an independent nonprofit that is home to The National Database of sheltered animal statistics, providing facts and enabling insights to save lives. Our impact on the commmunity is feedback from our volunteers, people wanting to help. Volunteers log hours donated, transport volunteers log miles driven and we receive positive feedback through thank you notes, postings on social media and testimonials and reviews.

From 2016 to 2019 we have saved 904 dogs and found homes for 829 of those. Sadly 14 dogs that either died in our care or were euthanized were provided a safe, loving home and whatever medical care was needed to try and save them. They died knowing they had been loved. At the end of 2019 we had 61dogs in our care waiting for their forever families. We have provided an opportunity for dogs from the south to be transported out of the problem, high risk area, to areas where there is a shortage of dogs. We are in the process of setting up a Pet Food Bank, and we are an approved over-flow organization with the GreaterGood.org Rescue Bank program. We are not only providing education to the community and through social media of our goals, but we are ourselves, furthering our education in order to help more. We have certificates with the Fear Free Shelter Program and a certification in Dog Bite Prevention Educator and when we are able to safely get out to schools and amongst the community will be setting up the Be a Tree Program. Be a Tree program is a dog bite prevention seminar program for school-age children. This program focuses on fun and interactive activities to teach children how to read dog body language and how to act safely around both their own dog and strange dogs. We are hoping to expand our facility, providing not just more volunteer opportunities, but full and part time positions to provide a move available approach for people throughout the east coast and Canada.

Financials

GIVE A DOG A HOME GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG RESCUE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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This organization has no recorded board members.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/14/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

German Shepherd Dog Rescue, Animal Rescue, German Shepherds, Rescue