ESP EDUCATION AND LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE INC

Empowering Dreamers to Become High Achievers

Long Beach, CA   |  www.bossprograms.org

Mission

COVID laid bare the inequities in education and how equitable opportunities are so dependent on parental background, wealth and resources and our mission is to create an equal playing field in education for boys of color and those from under-resourced communities and schools, by providing positive role models, year-round and multi-year academic guidance and coaching (STEAM focused), life advice, career exposure and networking, resources and equipment to increase their chances for personal and professional success. We supplement what parents and schools can provide so that are boys are also from "advantaged" households.

Ruling year info

2011

CEO

Everett L Glenn

Chief Strategist

Elihu Miles

Main address

7941 E Cramer St

Long Beach, CA 90808 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-5341862

NTEE code info

Business, Youth Development (O53)

Urban, Community (S31)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The problem we are working to address is the lingering and persistent disparity in achievement by boys of color and those from under-resourced communities and schools (Target Group Boys) versus other groups. Currently, nearly ¾ of the 2,000 Target Group Boys in the Long Beach Unified School District (District) are exiting high school WITHOUT MEETING the requirements to apply to a 4-year college or university. There are approximately 35,000 Target Group Boys at the county level, and approximately 114,000 Target Group Boys at the state level.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

BOSS (Business of Success beyond Sports)

A year-round and multi-year academic enrichment, financial literacy, life skills, leadership and personal development "process" that equips student-athletes and, through them, their non-athlete peers, with the tools to attain proficiency in the core content areas; take Algebra as 8th graders; achieve proficient/advanced status in reading and math by the end of 8th grade; be high school ready entering 9th grade; and college ready entering 12th grade.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The success of BOSS will be measured by the performance of our boys against their non-BOSS peers on metrics that measure proficiency in core content areas, college eligibility, and college & career readiness as follows: 5th and 8th Grade Mathematics Proficiency; 5th and 8th Grade English Language Arts Proficiency; 8th Grade Algebra I Enrollment and Proficiency; California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) Pass Rate in 10th Grade; High School Graduation Rate; “A-G” College Entrance Requirements Completion Rate; SAT and ACT College Entrance Exam Performance; AVID Participation in Middle and High Schools; Advanced Placement (AP) Course Enrollment and Passage; College Early Assessment Program (EAP) Participation and Performance; and College Admissions.

Progress against the established metrics will be available and reportable annually. Near term qualitative observations echo the quantitative outcomes: outlook, self-perception, body language, shift in attitudes, priorities, values. Long term will be college entrance and readiness. Longer term will be college completion, full-circle return.

We are using the following strategies to achieve impact:
1. Improving noncognitive skills such as perseverance (“grit”), conscientiousness, self-control, trust, attentiveness, self-esteem and self-efficacy, resilience to adversity, openness to experience, empathy, humility, tolerance of diverse opinions and the ability to engage productively in society.
a. Conducting conative, cognitive, affective and emotional intelligence assessments
of participants to understand their coping skills, adaptability and well-being to identify areas of strength and weakness around their ability to understand and communicate emotions; to have satisfying interpersonal relationships and understand and appreciate the emotions of others; to manage and control emotions and respond calmly to stressful events; to be flexible, realistic and effective in solving problems and managing change; retain a positive outlook on life.
b. Mentor/mentee and peer leader interactions and example setting.
c. Building “pathways to adult success” by helping students understand how their school performance contributes to making these pathways smoother and impacts their future options.
d. Provide engaging real world experiences and opportunities for learning connected to student interests, including opportunities to practice new skills through hands-on experiences, practical examples, cooperative learning experiences, and real-world activities.
2. Increasing Academic Performance
a. Aligning the academic component of the Program with what participants are/will be doing in school and delivering a rigorous and relevant curriculum aligned to the core content standards.
b. Adapting the Program to meet the needs of participants, using formal and informal assessment data to learn what adaptations are necessary. Using one-on-one and/or small group tutoring to provide targeted assistance.
c. Teaching on “learning how to learn” skill development, i.e. study skills, learning to learn skills, research skills, inquiry skills using our unique note taking, test preparation and time management system.
d. Developing criteria to assign resources to ensure prioritization based on greatest need as indicated by student data
3. Improving Attitudes Towards School and Learning/Academic Achievement
a. Focusing on student strengths and student success. For each student, consider “the glass as half full” rather than “the glass as half empty”. Encourage students as much as possible, understanding that not all students will be strong in all areas, and that it is important to help each student find his or her strengths and interests and to build on them.
b. Leveraging sports participation to create the expectation that effort makes a difference in learning. Help boys of color understand that when someone works hard, they are more likely to succeed, and providing opportunities for them to put effort into areas that interest them and that they enjoy
4. Improving School/Classroom Behavior; Reducing Incidents

We are finalizing an organizational/strategic plan to ensure that we have the internal support and resources to effectively manage the Program. We are confident in our current capacity, having staged 7 successful Super Bowl events around the Program, three camps, each of 2-weeks in duration in different locations, and delivered a consistent level of student engagement beyond the camp.

Because of our new partnership with the District, College and the California Interscholastic Federation (CIF), we have decided to relocate and focus Program activities in Long Beach. We will deploy all our resources to make Long Beach the beachhead from which we will expand into adjacent cities who are also challenged by the lack of academic achievement and poor behavior by boys of color. They youngsters who have participated in the Program to date are now high school students. We have connected them other programs and services to support them in a trajectory of life which increasingly requires higher education. A select group of youngsters who are high school students and who live close to Long Beach will continue to participate in the Program as peer leaders consistent with the train the trainer aspect of the Program.

We are uniquely qualified to accomplish our goals and achieve our intended impact. Many of the members of our team have overcome the same type of obstacles that boys of color in the District face. Many have progressed through the middle school to professional ranks achieving academic and athletic success simultaneously. Many have also leveraged their status as student athletes to positively impact their non-athlete peers. We also have a history of success in helping professional athletes achieve success beyond sports and utilizing their influence to positively impact their peers in an industry where the data suggests that upwards of 80% of them will face unemployment, bankruptcy and divorce within a few years of retirement.


We have installed a new board, with experts in the areas of education (specific to boys of color), finance, fundraising, human resources, law, marketing, nonprofit management and organizational strategy. The capacity (and network) of our board will help us minimize the costs otherwise associated with developing a fundraising and sustainability plan as well as the methods and metrics we will use to evaluate the success of the Program. We will strategically add paid staff as we grow a stable and diverse funding base, and maximize manpower resources available through the College and District to ensure that we effectively manage the Program.

For the 3rd year in a row, District metrics confirm and almost across-the-board outperform by BOSS participants versus their non-BOSS peers on the 10 metrics tracked by the District

Financials

ESP EDUCATION AND LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ESP EDUCATION AND LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE INC

Board of directors
as of 6/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Everett Glenn

ESP Education & Leadership Institute

Kofi Lomotey

West Carolina University

Robert Gustavis

AIG

Ryan Delaney

Oak Tree Capital

Kate Ferrara

Holland & Knight

David Coleman

Pac-12 Conference

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/30/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.