International Crisis Aid Inc

Saving Lives, Saving Souls, Changing Futures

aka Crisis Aid, Crisis Aid International, ICA   |   St. Louis, MO   |  www.crisisaid.org

Mission

Crisis Aid assists in sustaining life. We provide life-saving services and hope to the most vulnerable of populations, through customized responses that bring immediate relief. We address the human condition and fundamental needs to survive and then thrive. Working alongside community leaders, holistic building-blocks are established and true community transformation is made possible.

Notes from the nonprofit

Crisis Aid exists to Save Lives, Save Souls and Change Futures. Our work is centered around responding to crisis situations and transitioning people from the crisis to self-sufficient sustainability. Because of our faithful partners, we are moving to the next steps of a 13 million dollar plan (more than 4,4 million is already committed) which will enable us to reach more than 1.7 million people in crisis in the next five years. We would be happy to email you more details on our development plan or visit with you directly.

Ruling year info

2002

CEO / Founder & President

Mr. Pat Bradley

Main address

PO Box 510167

St. Louis, MO 63151 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

30-0060905

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Crisis Aid main goal is to work in areas where no other help is available to the people living there. We primarily work in the United States and East Africa. Saving lives and bringing hope through food, water, and medical care is our first priority. Holistic, long-term, solutions are our goal.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Disaster & Crisis Relief

Crisis Aid responds to natural disasters, crisis situations, and times of need focusing on orphans, pregnant mothers, and vulnerable populations.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The U.S. Refuge Home first opened in December of 2012 in Missouri and was the very first holistic home and safe haven specifically for American female survivors of sex trafficking.

In partnership with other service organizations, since day one we have provided trauma-based care and holistic healing services for both adults and minors. Showered with love, care, safety, support, health, prayer and opportunity these girls truly have the tools to not only survive but thrive in the face of all the horrible things done to them.

The home provides trafficked little girls and young women with not only a warm safe place to live but additional support in the form of professional counseling, life skills classes, access to critical medical and community resources and eventually, healing. We are committed to each girl and the new life she deserves.

Since December 2012, through the U.S. Refuge Home, our partners have enabled us to help more than 205 girls rescued from sexual slavery.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents
Young adults

Crisis Aid built and opened our Girl's Home in February 2009. Our Home is located on the outskirts of the capital Addis Ababa. It is home for up to 60 girls who have been orphaned and have no one else to care for them. When they come to their new home, the children receive food, shelter, schooling and vocational training. The orphanage is run in a family format where house parents take care of children replicating a family environment. The Home is the first phase of a long-term community development program. We do not adopt girls out of the home per our agreement with the local government.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents

In February 2008, Crisis Aid had the grand opening of our Medical Clinic in a remote village in East Africa. This was once a government-run medical facility that offered sub standard care to the community because of severe budget shortfalls. By taking over this clinic, Crisis Aid has established medical outposts where we can treat people living too far from the clinic. For the first time in this region, the community of more than 140,000 men, women and children has access to quality health care.

Since 2008, Crisis Aid has treated more than 266,000 people at our medical clinic alone. We treat an average of 3,100 patients every month, which includes malaria, TB, prenatal care, deliveries, family planning, HIV testing, vaccinations and more. We also provide health education classes.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children and youth

Together, we are providing food for people in desperate need every day. Since 2002 Crisis Aid has provided more than 92.7 million meals in East Africa and has fed over 2.250,000 people, including more than 223,600 severely malnourished children who would have likely not survived without Crisis Aid.

Thank you for being an answer to prayer for these precious children. You are a vitally important part of a team of dedicated people making it possible to save lives, save souls and change futures.

We use a measuring tool that UNICEF and WFP use to measure program beneficiaries Middle Upper Arm Circumference to record their degree of malnutrition and to measure their improvement while in our programs

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

Crisis Aid began our "Safe Campaign” by rescuing our first girl from a red light district in December 2006. In March 2007, we opened our first home for young girls we rescued from red light districts of Addis Ababa, East Africa. We now operate multiple Safe Homes in East Africa--called Refuge Homes. We have provided services to more than 1800 girls in our East Africa Refuge Homes. Girls rescued in East Africa range from 9-40 years old.

Once they are rescued and taken to their new home, girls receive food, shelter, clothing, emotional and spiritual counseling, educational opportunities, vocational training, medical care, and more.

We currently average 24 girls in our East Africa Safe Homes. We also have more than 40 girls in our Phase 2 program, meaning they graduated the Safe Homes and are living independently while working, finishing school, and continuing to receive case management, counseling, and more.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents

Community Helping Community was born in response to the vulnerable and millions who have lost their jobs and the ability to provide for their family in light of COVID -19.

We bring hope, dignity, and tangible expressions of Love to empower individuals, families, and other organizations to do the same.

Crisis Aid is equipping members of the community with a door-opening tool to help each other. People now have the power to help those around them with supplemental quality groceries. They are able to connect with their neighbors, friends, and whole communities as well.

Our goal is to see whole communities transformed by individuals stepping out and doing more; more for family, more for friends, and more for the entire community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Widows and widowers
Unemployed people

Although we operate multiple Refuge homes in East Africa, there are never enough beds for the number of girls praying to be rescued from red-light districts. So in March 2010, Crisis Aid bought a property that was once used as a brothel in the red-light district. Mercy Chapel is being used as a church, counseling center and vocational training center for the tens of thousands of young girls forced to sell their bodies every day just to survive.

The vocational training program is a one-year commitment where girls have the opportunity to learn hairdressing, silk screen printing, computers, weaving, leather crafts, and sewing. We are also working with a government program for job placement upon graduation.

The vocational training program is a one-year commitment where girls have the opportunity to learn hairdressing, silk screen printing, computers, weaving, and sewing. We are also working with a government program for job placement upon graduation.

Population(s) Served
Sex workers
Women and girls
Homeless people
Extremely poor people

Providing water wells is one part of a holistic community development model being implemented by Crisis Aid in East Africa.

Crisis Aid began implementing a program in 2008 to provide people living in remote villages with clean water. Crisis Aid has already provided 48 water wells in East Africa. Each location of the wells was the first time the people in the surrounding areas have had to get clean water.

Our goal for one community is to provide a total of 90 deepwater wells to provide clean water for the entire community. You can sponsor a well for $13,000 and we will place a plaque in your honor.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

CAPP is a revolutionary new collaborative initiative that focuses on reaching children at risk for sex trafficking or other forms of child sexual abuse. C.A.P.P. provides advocacy, resources, and support to children and families identified in internet/electronics-related crimes against children and human trafficking investigations. C.A.P.P. provides tools such as assistance accessing Internet Safety Education (ISE) programs to help parents of children engaged in high-risk sexual activities online, activities that leave them vulnerable to trafficking or other forms of sexual abuse.

Our team of full-time staff embedded with 6 police units across Missouri and Michigan have already served more than 645 people in immediate need since the end of 2018.

Statistically, 194 of the 323 individuals enrolled in CAPP (sample in 2020) will experience child sexual victimization such as child sex trafficking without CAPP intervention or similar services.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Adolescents
Victims of crime and abuse
Preteens
Children

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2010

Charity Navigator 2011

Charity Navigator 2012

Charity Navigator 2013

Charity Navigator 2014

Charity Navigator 2015

Charity Navigator 2016

Charity Navigator 2017

Charity Navigator 2018

Charity Navigator 2019

Awards

Member 2013

Accord Network

Gold Member 2013

GuideStar Exchange Seal

Gold Member 2014

GuideStar Exchange Seal

Top Rated Nonprofit 2013

GreatNonprofits - www.greatnonprofits.org

Top Rated Nonprofit 2014

GreatNonprofits - www.greatnonprofits.org

Top Rated Nonprofit 2015

GreatNonprofits - www.greatnonprofits.org

Top Rated Nonprofit 2016

GreatNonprofits

Top Rated Nonprofit 2017

Great Non-Profits

Top Rated Nonprofits 2018

GreatNonprofits

Member 2019

Accord Network

Top Rated Nonprofit 2019

GreatNonprofits - www.greatnonprofits.org

Affiliations & memberships

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2005

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2006

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2007

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2008

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2009

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2010

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2011

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2012

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2013

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2014

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2015

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2016

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2017

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2018

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number represents the total number of people reached through our programs in East Africa and the USA

Number of health outcomes improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Multiracial people, People of African descent, Pregnant people, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

East Africa Medical Clinic

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Totals represent patients treated in a our pediatric medical clinic along with a 1 week medical outreach treating over 4,800 patients

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

US Refuge Safe Home for Female Victims of Sex Trafficking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Crisis Aid provides training in trauma informed care to our staff and core volunteers who work with victims of sex trafficking. We implemented new training programs for Hospitals and law enforcement.

Number of clients who become literate because of literacy education programs by the nonprofit

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Children in East Africa who have never attended school are brought to a 3rd grade level within ten months. Children go from not being able to read or write to graduating 3rd grade in just one year.

Pounds of food distributed worldwide

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes East Africa Feeding Programs for severely malnourished children and their families; disaster relief projects; and our WINGS Love & Care Youth Center in south St. Louis, MO, USA.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Each of our programs have their own very specific goals, but the primary common goal is to go where others will not or cannot go to provide programs that save and restore lives that would otherwise be lost. We do not just give "hand outs" in our core programs. We develop holistic programs that reach multiple needs of children and families, empowering them to not only survive the day, but to have successful, hopeful, happy futures. Thousands more children n the areas we serve are in need of basic services, rescue and restoration. We have encountered thousands of children who will die without our help. We have a $13 million expansion plan to greatly impact more children and families, with $4.4 million already received in commitments and promises. Our long-term goal is to serve over 1 million people a year who are in crisis situations. Each program has very specific goals of its own.

Crisis Aid has developed specific goals and strategies to accomplish those goals for each of our individual programs.

Thousands more children are in need of basic services, rescue and restoration. We have encountered thousands of children who will die without our help. We have a $13 million expansion plan to greatly impact more children and families, with $4.4 million already received in commitments and promises.

In addition to our current programs, our new expansion steps will be targeted as follows, and spread over the next five years as funding allows:

EAST AFRICA

• FEEDING PROGRAMS: Add 3,000 more children and families at risk of starvation
• MEDICAL CARE: Launch Pediatric Medical Center in remote village without access to health care
• WATER: Provide 2 additional water wells each year (10 total) for access to clean water
• CHILDREN'S HOME: Add 5-10 more orphans/vulnerable girls each year up to 60 girls
• SAFE PROGRAMS: Further establish Phase II Independent Living Program for graduates of Refuge Home; double girls served through Mercy Chapel Vocational Training Center to 200 girls; Build Girls' Village so we can transition from renting to owning self-sustaining homes


UNITED STATES

“WINGS" OF LOVE AND CARE YOUTH CENTER/ST. LOUIS:
• FACILITY: Complete rehabbing project with professional service volunteers to provide more capacity for children & families
• FOOD: Provide food assistance for an additional 1,800 low-income people per year
• CHILDREN/YOUTH: Launch children and youth programs to include tutoring, mentoring and addressing vulnerability among an at-risk population
• ADULTS: Launch programs for adults including job skills training, parenting classes, family reunification and more
• OPPORTUNITIES: Provide self-sustaining skills for low-income mothers in the neighborhood to provide for their families

US REFUGE HOME FOR SEX TRAFFICKING VICTIMS
• REHABILITATION: Provide holistic rehabilitation services to up to 22 women at a time ages 18-24
• MINORS: Provide holistic rehabilitation services to up to 8 female minors, including on-site schooling
• CURRICULUM: Expand reach of our Human Trafficking Prevention Curriculum to schools, churches & communities nationwide.

We are committed to “helping the helpless" with relief efforts locally and globally and equipping those who are beyond the crisis to take responsibility by providing programs which train, inspire and move them to independent, self-sustaining living.

The Crisis Aid Family is large and growing and we invite other people who refuse to “do nothing" to join in our mission to impact lives, souls and futures! With your partnership, the prayers and dreams of thousands more children and families will be answered.

All programs are evaluated on a monthly basis to measure effectiveness and record data.

Crisis Aid has raised $4.4 million in commitments and promises toward our $13 million plan. We have a strategic development plan where we are first approaching our current and past partners and also meeting with other like-minded and like-hearted individuals, groups, churches, corporations, etc. to share what we have accomplished, where we are going, the next steps in the plans, and how they can participate.

Crisis Aid has an accomplished team at our international headquarters and also in East Africa. Our CEO has been serving the suffering since 1989 in more than 30 countries. Our East Africa directors are Ethiopians with western educations and decades of experience. One is an OBGYN. They speak, read and write 5 languages, have authored multiple books, and earned multiple awards worldwide for their work in HIV/AIDS, malnutrition, pediatrics, women's issues and more. C/V available upon request.

Additionally, Crisis Aid partners with other local NGOs who have multiple decades of experience when appropriate and possible.

We have raised 5.4 million in commitments and promises toward our $13 million dollar expansion plan.

Please contact Crisis Aid for specifics as we have too many programs to detail all accomplishments and how they propel Crisis Aid toward our intended goals and impact in the provided space. Here are a few fast facts:

Crisis Aid has served more than 2.9 million people in crisis situations since 2002.

Crisis Aid has served more than 1,800 female victims of sex trafficking worldwide since 2006.

Crisis Aid has provided more than 18 million pounds of food and other aid to severely malnourished children and people in disasters since 2002.

Crisis Aid has provided medical care to more than 565,000 people who would not have had access otherwise.

Crisis Aid built a children's home to serve up to 60 girls who are orphans in East Africa.

Crisis Aid has provided 48 water wells.

Crisis Aid has provided food aid to more than 320,000 people in the United States since 2012.

In 2015, Crisis Aid secured a donor and bought a large food truck that will be used to transport food for all of our programs. It will be used as an income generation project as well, as we will rent it out to bring in additional funds to support the programs.

Funding has always been our greatest obstacle. The need is beyond our current financial capacity. For example, we are currently aware of more than 1,000 additional families who have at least one child that will die of starvation this year without immediate intervention. But we are limited by funding designated for the program.

Another example is with our Safe Program where we rescue girls from sex trafficking. There are hundreds of girls wanting to get into our Refuge homes and into our Mercy Chapel Vocational Training Program because they have seen the success in the lives of their friends, but funding is limiting our ability to reach more girls. We learned that coupling the two programs and reducing the length of stay in the homes before independent living would be best, so we are finalizing the completion of a 'Girl's village' where more girls can be reached at one time. We will also build a storefront on the front of the property for the community to rent which will serve as an income generation project.

In all programs, we have made adjustments along way as we learn from our outcomes. We are excited about the next 3-5 years and the steps we are taking toward our long-term goals as well. Visit www.crisisaid.org for more information. Or contact us at [email protected] or 1-888-740-7779.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People living in remote areas of East Africa. Victims of sex trafficking, the hungry in the USA.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email, Actually talking to the people we serve in very remote parts of East Africa.,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We opened a new pediatric clinic in a remote part of Eat Africa. We focus on severe malnutrition. Many mothers (about 1200 every month) bring their children to receive help to the clinic but many have to walk 5-8 hours to reach it. After talking with some of them we opened an outpost clinic closer to where they are so that significantly reduces the time to bring their child to see a doctor. This is only pediatric care available in this region of East Africa. Girls in our refuge home in East Africa were traveling up to 2 hours each way to vocational training classes, this was due to traffic. Based on their comments we opened a smaller vocational school within walking distance of these girls.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has not really changed our relationship. We love these people and that is why we are there. It does help them to feel a part of our work as opposed to just receiving services, at least some. Our role is to save as many lives of young children as possible. Additionally, the feedback has led us to actually create some jobs for these beneficiaries, mothers, to be able to earn money. Most exist on less than $2.00 per day.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, Our work in East Africa in primarily in very remote locations. SO we do this the best we can,

Financials

International Crisis Aid Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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International Crisis Aid Inc

Board of directors
as of 10/6/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Pat Bradley

International Crisis Aid

Term: 2016 - 2022

Susan Bradley

Crisis Aid

Dane Welch

General & Restorative Dental Practice

Jerry Fitzgerald

Self Employed advertising exec

Chris Igo

Kimley-Horn and Associates

Caroli Young

Self Employed Marketing Consultant

James Fillingame

Minister

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/12/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/12/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.