Housing, Shelter

ALI FORNEY CENTER

aka AFC   |   New York, NY   |  www.aliforneycenter.org

Mission

The Mission of the Ali Forney Center is to help homeless Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning youth be safe and become independent as they move from adolescence to adulthood. Too many of these youth are rejected by their families and the broader community and are thus forced to survive on the streets, facing the dangers of violence, HIV infection and homophobia. The Ali Forney Center is committed to providing homeless LGBT&Q youth with the services they need to thrive, including shelter, HIV Prevention and life skills training.

Ruling year info

2002

President and Executive Director

Mr. Alexander Roque

Main address

224 West 35th St 1500

New York, NY 10001 USA

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EIN

30-0104507

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Ali Forney Center (AFC) is addressing the needs of homeless LGBTQ youth as a result of family rejection. Each year, the Ali Forney Center sees over 1,500 young people who run away or are thrown out of their homes because the families cannot accept their LGBTQ identity. Statistically, LGBTQ youth are eight times more likely to be homeless than non-LGBTQ youth. Once homeless, these young people are eight times more likely to experience violence on the streets, sexual assault, mental health issues, and suicidal ideation. Many young people often face homophobic violence and harassment in the youth shelter system and turn to the streets of NYC instead. AFC seeks to address the problem of LGBTQ youth homelessness that is rampant in our city—and our nation. In NYC alone, advocates estimate there are between 3,800-4,000 homeless youth, and NYC offers just over 750 beds expressly for this population.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing for Homeless Youth

The Ali Forney Center Services AFC is a comprehensive emergency housing program for LGBT youths aged 16 - 24. Our goal is to provide homeless LGBT youths with the support and services they need to escape the streets and begin to live healthy and independent lives. We offer an innovative continuum of services which include the following programs: Ali Forney Day Center The AFC Day Center in the Chelsea section of Manhattan is the entry point to our programs for homeless youths. There we offer street outreach, referral to our housing programs, case management, primary medical care, HIV testing, mental health assessment and treatment, food and showers. In the second half of 2005 we will also begin to offer an employment assistance program. AFC Emergency Housing AFC offers a scattered-site emergency housing program with sites in Manhattan and Brooklyn. We offer temporary housing in safe, staff-supervised homelike apartments. LGBT youths are able to reside in our emergency housing program for up to six months while we assist them in moving on to more permanent housing. In the second half of 2005, we are expanding our emergency housing program from 12 beds to 18 beds. AFC Transitional Housing AFC will begin to open a transitional housing program in the second half of 2005. When fully implemented, we will be offering scattered-site housing to 24 youths. The young people will be able to reside in our transitional housing program for up to two years, while we assist them in gaining employment and in continuing their educations. We will place a great deal of emphasis in helping our residents become prepared to live independently, and our goal is that our residents, upon graduation from this program, will move on to their own apartments.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people
At-risk youth
Budget
$11,291,298

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new clients intakes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people,At-risk youth,Homeless people

Related Program

Housing for Homeless Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients enrolled in our Learning, Employment, Advancement, Placement Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people,At-risk youth,Homeless people

Related Program

Housing for Homeless Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of residents who stayed in Emergency Housing throughout the calendar year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people,At-risk youth,Homeless people

Related Program

Housing for Homeless Youth

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of residents who stayed in Transitional Housing throughout the calendar year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people,At-risk youth,Homeless people

Related Program

Housing for Homeless Youth

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of residents who stayed in Transgender Housing throughout the calendar year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people,At-risk youth,Homeless people

Related Program

Housing for Homeless Youth

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of therapy sessions that were conducted at AFC

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people,At-risk youth,Homeless people

Related Program

Housing for Homeless Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients we connect to a psychiatrist at AFC

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people,At-risk youth,Homeless people

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of rapid HIV test that health counselors conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people,At-risk youth,Homeless people

Related Program

Housing for Homeless Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of young people reached during outreach events

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people,At-risk youth,Homeless people

Related Program

Housing for Homeless Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals served in a calendar year at the Drop-In Center

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people,At-risk youth,Homeless people

Related Program

Housing for Homeless Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Our goals are: Help young people overcome the traumas and detriments of family rejection and street homelessness; Provide housing and support life skills development; and to empower, educate and provide young people with the tools they need to exit the streets and homeless housing systems; Mitigate barriers for youth seeking educational support; Offer robust educational case management; Build more educational programs (classroom instruction) at AFC; Build and manage educational engagement opportunity within the community; Improve retention of homeless youth enrolled in educational programs; and Build a case for success to impact future funding.

At the helm of our work is a comprehensive Drop-In Program that operates 24-hours a day, 7-days a week, 365-days a year. Through AFC’s Drop-In Center, we have been able to offer our full continuum of care, serving over 77,000 meals per year, and providing medical and mental health care (including HIV education, testing, treatment and prevention services), showers, clothing and other supportive services (educational counseling, work and career options, one-on-one mentoring, etc.) to nearly 1,700 young people we see each year. The culturally-competent array of services offered are critical for homeless LGBTQ youth as it provides young people the opportunity to empower themselves with the tools and resources necessary to rebuild their lives. For many of them, it is their first exposure in an LGBTQ welcoming and inclusive environment. This environment is particularly vital as nearly 90% of the young people who visit this site are in crises having most recently experienced family rejection, homophobia, gay-bashing, violence, and other harmful effects of street homelessness. This site offers young people the tools they need to heal from family rejection and the harms of homelessness with the help of caring, dedicated professionals. The Ali Forney Center offers LGBTQ youth, ages 16-24, emergency and transitional housing and support so that these young adults can escape a life on the streets and begin to live healthy and independent lives. AFC offers an innovative range of services that provide a nurturing, caring, and supportive environment. These services include the AFC Day Center, which offers street outreach, referral to the housing programs, case management, primary medical care, HIV testing, mental health assessment and treatment, food, showers, and an employee assistance program. AFC also provides scattered-site emergency and longer-term housing with locations in Manhattan and Brooklyn. Also, AFC offers a family outreach program that works to support and strengthen families by providing counseling, education, and outreach services.

Our programs include: Medical, mental health, and substance abuse; Career and Educational Services are provided through a program called Learning, Employment, Advancement, and Placement (LEAP). LEAP is a 35-hour a week program with two distinct tracks designed to support the educational and career needs and desires of homeless LGBTQ youth. The program is offered in part on-site in a classroom in Harlem and throughout the city. We conduct assessments based on their desired paths, offer remedial services, provide classroom instruction, and support youth every step of the way. Volunteers help with tutoring, homework help, skills development, mock interviews, and other skills. Advocacy, leadership development, and empowerment are offered through weekly groups, and one on one sessions. Young people are engaged in understanding how they can play a role in influencing change in our community by using their voices to serve as advocates for causes important to them. Housing and life-skills development are provided through a 17-unit scattered-site housing program. Young people can reside in our Emergency Shelter Program or in our more independent Transitional Housing Programs.

The organization tracks progress by setting benchmarks for each department. For the central Drop-In Center, programmatic short-term and long-terms are set for the outreach, physical / mental health, and LEAP vocational/educational programs. The outreach program’s monthly and quarterly process goals include tracking the number of youth reached during the street outreach and community events, as well as tracking the reach of social media activity. Outcome goals include youth who then made their way to the central Drop-In Center to complete initial intake assessment interviews. The physical health program’s process goals include tracking the number of clients who are tested quarterly for HIV/STIs, and are engaged in preventive / treatment medical care. Outcome goals include tracking clinical measures, such as HIV Viral Load, and tracking STI infection incidence rates. The mental health and vocational/educational programs similarly track process and outcome goals. For our Emergency, Transitional, and Transgender housing programs, the progress indicators are their graduation destinations - we track whether they are able to move into independent living when they leave our housing programs.

In tracking client progress for reporting the year 2018, we were able to accomplish the following goals: Decrease rates of Food Insecurity by improving client engagement and retention at the central Drop-In Center; Increase rates of physical health-related behavioral change, specifically as it relates to increasing the number of clients who get tested quarterly for HIV/STIs; Increase the number of clients who are engaged in Mental Health care; Improve clients’ self-esteem, as measured via the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale; and Improve clients’ LGBTQ pride identity, as measured via the LGBTQ Identity scale.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: sms text surveys, electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), case management notes, community meetings/town halls, constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, suggestion box/email.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: it is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection.

  • What significant change resulted from feedback

    Pronoun pins Food requests what ingredients we purchase and what we put in our menu - culturally appropriate and makes them feel like they're at home

Financials

ALI FORNEY CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ALI FORNEY CENTER

Board of directors
as of 6/11/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Peter Soares

American Airlines

Term: 2020 -


Board co-chair

Julie O'Shaughnessy

Amazon

Term: 2020 -

Keith Vessell

Alberto Arelle

Billy Dume

Martin Farach-Colton

Marti Gould Cummings

Anthony Hird

Isis King

Mark Lane

Erin Law

Marie McKenna

Louis Miller

Tom Ogletree

John Owen

Carlos Ruisanchez

John Quinn

Ana Sani

Craig Smith

Collin Spencer

Dan Sternberg

Seth Stuhl

Pete Vujasin

Ed Wells

Katie Zunno

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/11/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/01/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Keywords

homeless youth, youth development, LGBT youth, housing, education