PLATINUM2024

iMentor

Every Student Deserves a Champion

aka iMentor   |   New York, NY   |  http://imentor.org

Mission

iMentor builds mentoring relationships that empower students from low-income communities to graduate high school, succeed in college, and achieve their ambitions.

Ruling year info

2003

Chief Executive Officer

Heather Wathington

Main address

199 Water Street 8th Floor

New York, NY 10038 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

iMentor

EIN

30-0105507

NTEE code info

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Secondary/High School (B25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The attainment of a college degree has never been more valuable. We know that a 4-year degree is worth 84% more than a high school diploma, accounting for $1M more in earnings over the course of a lifetime. Yet, an enormous gap in college completion exists across both racial and socioeconomic lines, where students from underserved backgrounds, including first-generation college students and Black and Latino students, are much less likely than their peers to attain a college degree. This systemic gap in educational attainment is detrimental for the young people impacted and for our society at large. Without increasing and diversifying the number of college graduates, our workplaces and communities will not benefit from the full spectrum of talents and perspectives that exist in our country.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mentoring Program

Our model harnesses the power of long-term, personal relationships to help students succeed. We partner with high schools in low-income communities, where a majority of students served will be first-generation college graduates.

Relationships are built via a unique combination of online communication and in-person events, which provides flexibility for volunteers, enabling professionals who would not be able to participate in a traditional mentoring program to get involved.

iMentor partners with schools in low-income communities, where a majority of students will be first-generation college students. We match every student in our partner schools with a college-educated mentor, who commits a minimum of three years to a single student. Mentoring pairs have the option to continue their relationship through college completion.

Our research-based college success curriculum structures each week of the mentoring relationship, providing a baseline of conversations and experiences for all mentoring pairs. iMentor assigns program staff, trained as college counselors, to ensure the success of each relationship by providing case management support to mentoring pairs. With our curriculum and staff to guide them, mentors and students build their relationship through weekly online communication and monthly in-person meetings.

iMentor recruits, screens, trains and matches volunteer mentors with students living in New York City, Chicago, and the San Francisco Bay Area. iMentor supports the relationships; designs technology-focused educational projects that allow mentors and mentees to collaborate with one another; trains teachers and staff of youth agencies to become comfortable with technology and to implement our programs; and develops web-based applications that allow other agencies to run their own online mentoring programs.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

To reach young people everywhere with our model for college success, we partner with local nonprofits to implement our mentoring program in their own communities. We have a rich history of collaboration with Big Brothers Big Sisters local agencies, together serving 3,004 mentoring pairs in 16 cities.

With more than 19 years of experience in mentoring and college success, iMentor helps local nonprofits impact college outcomes for first-generation students without having to reinvent the wheel. Together, our nonprofit partners create a national network with a shared commitment to working with schools in low-income neighborhoods.

Upon selection, nonprofit organizations receive training on the iMentor model and implementation guidance on our curriculum, technology, evaluation and best practices to support mentoring pairs. Our dedicated team provides ongoing training and coaching to each partner. Nonprofit partners pay a partnership fee and are responsible for the screening, training and support of local volunteers.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of graduates enrolled in higher learning, university, or technical/vocational training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, At-risk youth

Related Program

Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, At-risk youth

Related Program

Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Including iMentor's Partner Programs

Number of high school graduates who are persisting in college

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, At-risk youth

Related Program

Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Persistence to Year Two: persistence defined as immediate enrollees who remain enrolled in any college the following fall.

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, At-risk youth

Related Program

Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We recruited more than 2,400 new mentors to mentor in a virtual environment in 2020.

Number of program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, At-risk youth

Related Program

Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

22 Title I schools: schools that qualify for federal funding due to a large concentration of students demonstrating economic need.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our ultimate goal is for all high school students have the skills necessary to graduate high school, enroll in college, and graduate college successfully. Until all public high schools are resourced effectively to achieve this, we believe mentoring is the strongest method in helping students succeed.

Our model harnesses the power of long-term, personal relationships to help students succeed. We partner with high schools in low-income communities, where a majority of students served will be first-generation college graduates. Each year, we recruit thousands of volunteers who commit to mentor a high school student. We match every student in our partner schools with a college-educated mentor, who commits a minimum of three years to a single student. Mentoring pairs have the option to continue their relationship through college completion.

Our research-based college success curriculum structures each week of the mentoring relationship, providing a baseline of conversations and experiences for all mentoring pairs. iMentor assigns program staff, trained as college counselors, to ensure the success of each relationship by providing case management support to mentoring pairs. With our curriculum and staff to guide them, mentors and students build their relationship through weekly online communication and monthly in-person meetings.

For current statistics on the success of our program, see our results page on our website here: https://imentor.org/impact/results

Financials

iMentor
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

iMentor

Board of directors
as of 01/25/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

John Griffin

Chair

Karen Pavlin

ServiceNow

John Griffin

Blue Ridge Capital

Kimberley A. Hatchett

Morgan Stanley

Matthew Klein

Robin Hood Foundation

Lawrence Griff

Grant Thornton LLP

Charles Best

DonorsChoose.org

Mark Bezos

HighPost Capital

Katie Couric

Katie Couric Media

Alex Ehrlich

Percapita Group, LLC

David Saltzman

Two Sigma

Julian Robertson

John T. Lykouretzos

FocusGrowth Asset Management

Richard Buery

Robin Hood Foundation

Bianca Gottesman

TOMS Capital Investment Group

Gaurav Kapadia

XN

Joshua Hill

Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/04/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.