Wildlife Conservation Network, Inc.

aka WCN   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.wildnet.org

Mission

WCN protects endangered wildlife by supporting conservationists who ensure wildlife and people coexist and thrive.

Ruling year info

2002

Principal Officer

Charles Knowles

Executive Director

Jean-Gael Collomb

Main address

209 Mississippi Street

San Francisco, CA 94107 USA

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EIN

30-0108469

NTEE code info

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Wildlife around the world is increasingly threatened. Historically, one out of every one million species became extinct each year; since the Industrial Revolution in the mid-1800's, this rate of extinction has increased rapidly. Recent studies have shown that rates of extinction are currently 10 to 100 times higher than normal and that the world is on the brink of a sixth mass extinction, the first since the time of the dinosaurs. The presence of wildlife in our world is a treasure, one that we will never be able to reclaim if it disappears. WCN works with conservation partners around the world to protect endangered species so that wildlife and people can coexist and thrive.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Wildlife Programs

Provide direct support to a network of wildlife conservation partners, with a long-term commitment to endangered flagship species in 37 countries around the world. This support includes short and long-term grants to enhance WCN’s field-based conservation partners' ability to save endangered species in the wild through programs such as reducing human-wildlife conflict, improving wildlife-friendly livestock, land and crop management, developing alternative livelihood programs, monitoring wildlife, anti-poaching, building capacity in and around protected areas, providing community education for children and adults, and raising public awareness about wildlife.

In addition to our partner network, WCN's Wildlife Funds invest in a wide breadth of projects aimed at protecting a threatened species beyond a singular country and across its entire habitat. Our Funds identify and vet the best ideas from any institution, regardless of their size or stature, that are designed to stop a crisis and recover wildlife populations. All donations to the Funds go directly to the field, with zero overhead.

Our Wildlife Programs include range-wide support via our Wildlife Funds for species such as elephants, lions, pangolins, and rhinos, and deep focused support to organizations including, but not limited to, the Andean Cat Alliance, Cheetah Conservation Botswana, Cheetah Conservation Fund, Ethiopian Wolf Conservation Program, Ewaso Lions, Global Penguin Society, Grévy’s Zebra Trust, MarAlliance, Niassa Lion Project, Okapi Conservation Project, Painted Dog Conservation, Proyecto Titi, Saiga Conservation Alliance, Save the Elephants, Small Cat Conservation Alliance, Snow Leopard Conservancy, Spectacled Bear Conservation, and other mission-relevant organizations in Africa, Asia, Europe, and South America.

Population(s) Served

Provide a wide variety of technical assistance and support services to maximize the longterm impacts of field-based wildlife conservation partners and associates by enhancing their organizational capacity. These services include student internships, graduate scholarship support, cross site exchanges, leadership development, infrastructural improvement, training workshops, and access to expert advice and short term support (e.g. building capacity to improve accounting, donor outreach and management, grant writing, use of technology, etc).

Population(s) Served

Inform the public of wildlife conservation challenges and community-based solutions implemented by some of the world's most innovative and successful wildlife conservationists through a series of annual wildlife conservation events (including the Wildlife Conservation Expo), newsletters and web based information.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Program Support Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provided practical skills training to 50 field conservationists in 2019.

Number of entities served by expertise

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Wildlife Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2015 WCN had 14 conservation partners. In 2016 we added 3 additional partners and have maintained 17 partners in 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020.

Number of rallies/events/conferences/lectures held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Public Education and Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

WCN conducted 2 Wildlife Conservation Expos in 2019. We also conducted additional small fundraising events for our partners and Wildlife Funds throughout the year.

Number of critically endangered species for which conservation measures have been launched or supported

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Wildlife Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2019 WCN supported conservation for 16 flagship endangered species, 22 species of small cats, 18 species of penguins, 31 species of sharks and rays, 15 species protected by scholarship recipients.

Number of attendees present at rallies/events

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Public Education and Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers reflect attendees to our annual Wildlife Conservation Expo. There were 2 Expos in 2019, 2 in 2018, 3 in 2017, 4 in 2016, 2 in 2015, and 1 in 2014.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We aim to protect endangered wildlife and impact wildlife conservation by raising and deploying funds to support a wide range of field-based conservation organizations, enhance the capacity of current and future conservation leaders, and implement urgent collaborative species conservation funds.

WCN was built on the premise that one person can truly make a difference for wildlife. Independent wildlife conservationists have the power to ensure a future for wildlife by developing new solutions and working closely with communities to save endangered animals. In order to succeed, these wildlife heroes need funding to run their programs and assistance to build their organizations and ensure their efforts are scalable and sustainable. WCN partners with leading independent wildlife conservationists, providing them with an array of services and training in areas such as marketing, accounting, and strategic planning. WCN also creates connections to donors who can make these conservationists' work possible.

Expanding our Conservation Network:
Expanding the network enables WCN to broaden its conservation impact affecting a more diverse set of species across more geographies. Expanding the network includes the strategic addition of new conservation partners, improved networking amongst field conservationists, and measurable strengthening of our partners' organizational capacity.

Expand Organizational Capacity:
Individual and Institutional Donors: A core function of WCN is to raise funds for wildlife conservation as this support is vital for the ongoing success of our conservation partners and Wildlife Resurgence Funds recipients.
Capacity Building for Conservation Partners: We help our partners build capacity in a number of areas, including finance/accounting, scientific field expertise, marketing, events, donor development, and IT.
In general we provide: (a) strategic delivery of technical and financial services to field conservation programs, (b) fundraising for network members through grants and awards, (c) assistance and advice with respect to legal and trademark issues for field conservation programs, (d) communication & marketing support to field programs including audits of messaging platforms and materials, (e) direct funding to field conservation programs for strategic injections of support to build long-term organizational capacity. 

Develop Wildlife Resurgence Funds
WCN can transform how funds are raised and deployed through collaborative and innovative approaches such as the Elephant Crisis Fund to have a broad impact for wildlife across a species' range. WCN has expanded its impact on threatened wildlife through execution of species/threat-focused funds that increase collaboration and drive resources to the best programs that can reverse wildlife declines.

We have a network of partners that are able to learn best practices in wildlife conservation from each other.
We have a diversity of professional background amongst our staff to enable us to properly assess and address our partners' organizational and development needs: financial, scientific field expertise, marketing, events, donor development, IT.
We have brand recognition that enables us to organize the largest wildlife conservation public event in the US - the Wildlife Conservation Expo.
We have a network of 100+ volunteers.
We provide 30 hours of practical skills training to over 40 field conservationists, empowering them to expand and sustain over time the impacts of their programs to protect the species and habitat on which they focus. Training topics include communication, leadership training, strategic planning, fundraising training, and knowledge sharing across participants.

So far we have raised over $141 million to support wildlife conservation on the ground.
We've provided graduate scholarships to 128 scholars around the world.
We have provided organizational development support to 17 partners.
We have organized over 15 Wildlife Conservation Expos in three different cities in the US.
Our Wildlife Funds have supported 374 projects in 38 countries around the world and deployed over $28 million to protect elephants, lions, pangolins, and rhinos across their range.
We are developing a tool to help measure the organizational performance of our partners.
The diversity of species and geographies that we support is not as broad and inclusive as we want yet.

Financials

Wildlife Conservation Network, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Wildlife Conservation Network, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 7/1/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Charles Knowles

No Affiliation

Christine Hemrick

No Affiliation

Akiko Yamazaki

No Affiliation

Charles Knowles

No Affiliation

John Lukas

No Affiliation

Rebecca Patton

No Affiliation

Bill Unger

No Affiliation

David Berger

No Affiliation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data