GOLD2024

The Disabilities Foundation of Beaufort County Inc

aka ABLE Foundation   |   Beaufort, SC   |  www.ablefoundationbc.org

Mission

The mission of ABLE The Disabilities Foundation of Beaufort County is to provide a safe and healthy learning environment and supported community inclusion activities for children and young adults with intellectual and physical disabilities in Beaufort County while simultaneously providing qualified, affordable care for their families.

Ruling year info

2004

Chairperson

Ms melina Lee

Main address

100 Clearwater Way

Beaufort, SC 29906 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

30-0223168

NTEE code info

Autism (G84)

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Camp Treasure Chest

Camp Treasure Chest is the only summer camp in Beaufort County for children who are diagnosed with intellectual development and related disabilities. It is a four-week day program for children ages 6 through 12. The camp in CY 2021 begins June 20th through July 15th. This camp will have four major components:
Imagination Camp: Experiment, solve problems, make a mess. The camp will show the wonders of science an exploration while the children learn through interactive and hands-on science activities.
Animal Planet Camp—explore animals—campers will learn about different parts of the world and the animals.
Gardening Camp—make recycled crafts, understand simple and fun ways to go GREEN and to protect our Earth! Campers will learn about planting from seeds, different types of gardens and how to compost.
Low country camp—Discover new places and get to know where you live. Campers will gain a sense of community and culture while learning through games, yoga, dancing and much more.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with disabilities

Bright Beginnings services children ages birth through five to promote healthy physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development.
Under Bright Beginnings we visit each child, usually weekly, in their natural environment (home or child-care setting). During our visits we train the parents/caregivers on ways they can help the child learn and grow all throughout the family’s daily routines. We work directly with the children, demonstrating strategies and ideas for the parent/caregiver as we work with each child. This helps the child learn new skills.
We provide training/learning tools that can be customized for each individual child that can be used by both the parents and our trainers when interfacing with the children. We label these “Learning as I Grow” Resource Kits/Bags – providing resources to families. These kits help families understand developmental milestones and how to help their child achieve them.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
People with intellectual disabilities
People with learning disabilities
People with other disabilities
People with physical disabilities

Heritage Outreach & Great Expectations Program’s mission is to expand our educational program for individuals with Intellectual Disabilities & Related Disabilities (ID&RD). We serve individuals from many ethnic backgrounds. To help them and other individuals with disabilities better understand and celebrate this heritage we provide:
1. Educational programs, theater, musical performances, art, guest speakers and other cultural events
2. Visits to numerous local museums and historical sites such as Penn Center, the Santa Elena Museum, Mitchelville Freedom Park, Spanish and revolutionary forts and archeological sites in our area.
3. Trips to local farms to learn about the agricultural history of the low country.
4. Gullah cooking, cast netting for shrimp and lowcountry basket weaving design and development.
5. guest speakers and other educators to speak directly to our consumers.
consumers can participate as observers & and also be involved in a learning environment,

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Multiracial people
People with intellectual disabilities
People with learning disabilities
People with physical disabilities

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Christian Service Charities 2017

MOU with Beaufort County DSN 2022

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

ABLE accepts the tough cases that are not
being addressed by any other organization in Beaufort County.  Hundreds of children and adults in Beaufort
County experience life with a wide range of disabilities. Autism, Cerebral Palsy, Spine Bifida, and
Down’s Syndrome are some of the medical issues that can seriously limit their
day to day life opportunities. ABLE’s
active involvement in programs like Camp Treasure Chest provide opportunities
to individuals to provide them with: 
living skills, conflict resolution, problem processing skills, improved
communications and in an environment where they are safe.  ABLE’s goal is to provide an improved quality of life for many and thus bringing joy and mental relief to their families and care-givers.  That children and adults with these disabilities will become self sufficient and independent thus minimizing the lifetime dependency upon their immediate family and the care givers in Beaufort County.  These skills will allow them to live more productively in the Beaufort community by finding jobs and paying taxes and being contributing citizens of Beaufort County. Nutritional / Healthy Choice Program. Health research
conducted with adults who have I/DD shows that diet affects many secondary conditions, such as fatigue, weight problems, and
constipation or diarrhea. Proper nutrition can increase these individuals’
quality of life by improving existing secondary conditions and preventing
additional conditions from developing. 
ABLE is committed to providing Healthy Choice
projects for those consumers that enter the service.

Educate and provide advocacy to the Beaufort community of the problems, challenges and limitations that children and adults with disabilities continue to experience.  Working collaboratively with other community organizations to help meet the needs of these individuals and their families.Partner with local businesses to provide learning focused activities promoting health, safety, community involvement, and recreation/leisure skills. Increase community awareness of the unique needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities through community exposure to this population. Make the community aware of the services that are offered to families living in Beaufort County and those who move here with family members with a disability.Through day programs like Camp Treasure Chest provide them with:  living skills, conflict resolution, problem processing skills, improved communications and in an environment where they are safe.Provide safe housing for individuals in a domestic violent crisis.

Capabilities:  ABLE
was founded in 2004 as a 501 c3 organization to provide a better quality of
life for individuals with severe disabilities and special needs.  ABLE focuses on providing community-based
experiential learning opportunities addressing health, education and
socialization specifically for children with developmental and related
disabilities such as autism and cerebral palsy. 
ABLE accepts the tough cases that are not being addressed by any other
organization in Beaufort County.  

Staff:  Our professional
specialists that support Camp Treasure Chest work with children who have severe
physical and/or behavioral problems. 
Specifically they provide training in speech therapy, occupational and
physical therapy, health care and daily hygiene, and social skills. 
Staffs are trained to provide sensory stimulation or de-sensitizing strategies
for those children who require such intensive individualized care or who cannot
benefit from local excursions.  Many of
the children who attend the camp require one-on-one supervision and/or
direction. Learning opportunities have concentrated on health and wellness
education using multi-modal displays and activities addressing food and
nutrition, healthy eating, hydration, exercise, and appropriate
leisure/recreation choices such as bowling, swimming, music therapy, library
visits, dance and speech therapy, and gardening.  

External strengths:  ABLE partners with local businesses to provide learning focused activities
promoting health, safety, community involvement, and recreation/leisure
skills.  Community inclusion and experiential
learning opportunities are an integral part of the curriculum.  A
significant component of the camp is the active involvement and participation
from local stakeholders providing services and resources. Campers have learned
from and enjoyed presentations from the local fire department, the
police/sheriff’s department, Clemson Extension Services, SCE&G, and the
Beaufort-Jasper Water Authority.

In recent years,
planned activities have included field trips to places like the Charleston
Aquarium, Charleston Harbor Tours, Savannah Museum Trip, County Library visits,
The Fire Museum, riverboat tours, Dempsey Vegetable Farms, Island Playground,
Local Boat Tour, Bowling and Hunting Island State Park.  New experiences are added annually.

Long term goals----ABLE’s long term goal is that
children and adults with these disabilities will become self sufficient and
independent thus minimizing the lifetime dependency upon their immediate and
extended families and the care givers in Beaufort County.   Progress---The quality of life for each individual has improved remarkably for attending Camp Treasure Chest.  Many positives have been recorded:  Speech therapy where individuals are now able to speak in complete sentences; Group interaction where the campers are able to work within a group setting; self esteem and pride in individual achievements; physical and health hygiene where individuals can take of themselves.  These individuals have been able to develop new friendships with campers from other schools.  They have learned to go out in the community to restaurants and are able to place their orders with little to no assistance.  Many have learned proper table etiquette as well as developing indoor voice controls.  Some individuals have been able to graduate to self sufficiency by moving and living in group homes without having to depend upon family members for their every-day living.  Some of the individuals who attend Camp Treasure Chest are working in our local restaurants and grocery schools.  They were able to enhance and strengthen the skills needed to be taxpaying citizens of Beaufort County by attending the camp.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

The Disabilities Foundation of Beaufort County Inc
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Disabilities Foundation of Beaufort County Inc

Board of directors
as of 05/09/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms Melina Lee

Chair, Disabilities Foundation of Beaufort County, dba ABLE

Term: 2023 - 2026


Board co-chair

Beverly Dore

Vice Chair

Term: 2023 - 2025

William Krebs, Grant Proposals

USAF retired and Community Volunteer

Jayne Krebs

Community Volunteer

Beverly Dore, Co-chair

Community Volunteer

Melina Lee, Chair

MCCS, Tri Command, MCAS Beaufort Diasabled Needs Families

Colemn White

Treasurer

Martha Griffin

Community Volunteer

Biffy Dobyns

community volunteer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/25/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/25/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.