Amazing Grace Conservatory

"AGC is a place where everyone is Family", 2) "We don't do children's theatre, we do theatre with children"

Pasadena, CA   |  www.amazinggraceconservatory.org

Mission

The mission of Amazing Grace Conservatory (AGC) is to train and develop emerging artists and at-risk youth (ages 5-18) in the performing arts; offering well rounded, culturally enriching educational programs in an environment that is nurturing for personal, artistic and professional growth. An NAACP Award winning /community based non­-profit located in South Los Angeles focuses on disciplines of acting, dance, voice and media arts that create the complete experience for the aspiring actor, writer, director or producer. AGC opens avenues of possibilities for youth to be scene and heard, to shine, re-connect and respect themselves and others by being inclusive and divergent thinkers who drive toward excellence with undeniable values, a place where hearts are healed and lives are changed.

Ruling year info

2006

Executive/ Artistic Director

Ms. Wendy Raquel Robinson Ms.

Executive Vice President

Mrs. Jacquelyn Honore-Elam

Main address

P.O. Box 91243

Pasadena, CA 91109 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

30-0330862

NTEE code info

Performing Arts (A60)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Amazing Grace Conservatory addresses two significant South Los Angeles community needs: (1) the need for quality arts programming in schools; and (2) the need for effective interventions that promote student success in school and in life. First, disadvantaged and at-risk youth are often barred from school arts programs in favor of remedial instruction in reading and math. This practice contradicts research evidence that quality arts education provides even greater learning benefits to disadvantaged youth than their advantaged classmates. Second, nearly 20% of Los Angeles youth ages 16 to 24 are disconnected from education and employment. This means 97,000 young Angelinos are not in school, at work or preparing to enter the workforce. Unfortunately, South Los Angeles houses 34.17% of the city’s 16 to 24 year olds living in poverty (nearly double the percentage of the second closest of seven Los Angeles communities). Yet, more than 40% of area high school students report they se

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Amazing Grace Conservatory

AGC provides training in all three disciplines, acting, dance, voice, and integrates media arts to create the complete experience for aspiring filmmakers, writers, producers, and directors while administering specific training for acting in front the camera through the conservatory. The media arts training broadens the skill set of the students/actors in understanding the difference in approach when acting on a set vs. a stage. Training provide students with content that can be placed in a demo reel/resume, better preparing them to take on the competitive creative industry.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Amazing Grace Conservatory addresses two significant South Los Angeles community needs: (1) the
need for quality arts programming in schools; and (2) the need for effective interventions that promote
student success in school and in life.
First, disadvantaged and at‐risk youth are often barred from school arts programs in favor of remedial
instruction in reading and math. This practice contradicts research evidence that quality arts education
provides even greater learning benefits to disadvantaged youth than their advantaged classmates.
Second, nearly 20% of Los Angeles youth ages 16 to 24 are disconnected from education and
employment. This means 97,000 young Angelinos are not in school, at work or preparing to enter the
workforce. Unfortunately, South Los Angeles houses 34.17% of the city’s 16 to 24 year olds living in
poverty (nearly double the percentage of the second closest of seven Los Angeles communities). Yet,
more than 40% of area high school students report they see little if any value in “doing well in school”
and 80% of new ninth‐graders will either dropout or finish high school lacking academic and technical
readiness for work.
Taken together, there is an urgent need to re‐engage South Los Angeles youth in school and facilitate
their graduation from high school well‐prepared for college and career.
AGC addresses this issue by providing 14‐18 year old youth with engaging year‐round performing arts
(music, dance, acting, spoken word, etc.) opportunities and leadership development/social emotional
learning programming two hours per day, three to five days per week. Simultaneously, AGC influences
policy to sustain programming. AGC served more than at‐risk youth with a purpose of effecting three critical outcomes: (1)
increased exposure and engagement in the performing arts; (2) improved academic performance; and
(3) improved social behavior. Ultimately, AGC aims to ensure at‐risk youth graduate or obtain a
GED/HiSET certificate on time and well‐prepared for college or career.
At the conclusion of the 2015 program year, 94% (427 of 450) of program participants realized favorable
outcomes from baseline (program enrollment) to completion (12 months) in all three outcome
measures. AGC proposes to continue to measure these outcomes as a PAT grant recipient and program
provider. Our current methods of evaluating these outcomes and the tools used to collect and track data
and measure success are described below.
At‐risk 14‐18 year old South Los Angeles youth shall:
1. engage in a minimum of eight hours of performance arts education and participation per week as
measured by sign‐in sheets and video evaluation.
2. experience improved academic performance as measured by remedial learning gap‐specific
academic proficiency assessments and report cards. NOTE: The use of GPA alone as an indicator of
academic improvement is misleading.
3. demonstrate improved social behavior as measured by social emotional learning surveys.

Taken together, there is an urgent need to re‐engage South Los Angeles youth in school and facilitate
their graduation from high school well‐prepared for college and career.
AGC addresses this issue by providing 14‐18 year old youth with engaging year‐round performing arts
(music, dance, acting, spoken word, etc.) opportunities and leadership development/social emotional
learning programming two hours per day, three to five days per week. Simultaneously, AGC influences
policy to sustain programming.
In 2015, AGC served more than 450 at‐risk youth with a purpose of effecting three critical outcomes: (1)
increased exposure and engagement in the performing arts; (2) improved academic performance; and
(3) improved social behavior. Ultimately, AGC aims to ensure at‐risk youth graduate or obtain a
GED/HiSET certificate on time and well‐prepared for college or career.
At the conclusion of the 2015 program year, 94% (427 of 450) of program participants realized favorable
outcomes from baseline (program enrollment) to completion (12 months) in all three outcome
measures. AGC proposes to continue to measure these outcomes as a PAT grant recipient and program
provider. Our current methods of evaluating these outcomes and the tools used to collect and track data
and measure success are described below.
At‐risk 14‐18 year old South Los Angeles youth shall:
1. engage in a minimum of eight hours of performance arts education and participation per week as
measured by sign‐in sheets and video evaluation.
2. experience improved academic performance as measured by remedial learning gap‐specific
academic proficiency assessments and report cards. NOTE: The use of GPA alone as an indicator of
academic improvement is misleading.
3. demonstrate improved social behavior as measured by social emotional learning surveys.

Enhanced leadership focus and development
strategic partnersips through community based organizations
and attracting talent from local universities.
collection and tracking system to measure all client outcomes.(3000 characters)
AGC is a highly intentional trauma-informed performing arts-based youth development program that uses the enticement of the arts to impact three key outcomes: (1) increased exposure to and engagement in the performing arts; (2) mentoring to improve academic performance; and (3) mentoring to improve social behavior. Ultimately, the goal of the mentoring outcomes is to build leadership capacity, facilitate growth opportunities, develop well-rounded, socially viable, confident, talented, intelligent and disciplined youth, and position youth to graduate on-time and well-prepared for college or career.
Given these desired outcomes, our three primary objectives are as follows.
1. By October 31, 2016, a total of 100 14-18 year old South Los Angeles youth shall be enrolled in AGC and participate in a series of trauma-informed performing arts-based youth development activities including instruction and development in music, dance, spoken word and acting.
2. By June 30, 2017, 80% (80 of 100) of the 14-18 year old South Los Angeles youth enrolled in AGC will
demonstrate significant improvements in academic performance, leadership capacity, social behavior and general developmental growth as measured by established baseline and post assessments and other reputable quantitative and qualitative measures described in the Outcome and Evaluation section of this application.
3. Given our commitment to provide youth with a platform to be seen and heard in a non-judgmental
environment, AGC shall develop and implement a new evaluation and learning protocol that effectively facilitates accurate and relevant data collection and reporting by June 30, 2017. The protocol shall highlight the identification and measurement of critical interventions and milestones that are relevant to each participant’s journey in achieving established goals and objectives and ultimately realizing desired outcomes. Target population, dosage, theory of change, method of delivery, critical success indicator, inputs, outputs, short-term outcomes, interim outcomes and staff competence prescriptions shall also be included.
NOTE: AGC’s theory of change asserts that helping youth understand, believe and tap into the fullness of their potential while simultaneously helping them remove the barriers that retard their growth, positions youth to aspire to their greatness. Extensive research has demonstrated the ability of interventions to change attitudes, behaviors and beliefs is the most effective intervention in effectuating success in school and in life. However, traditional success indicators and monitoring tools fail to measure the most essential social emotional parameters that indicate positive progress in this respect. Accordingly, AGC is implementing the Ma

AGC was founded to directly and effectively address the challenges facing youth in marginalized communities. Today, less than 15% of South Los Angeles youth finish high school areready for college or a career. The impact of this inability to matriculate is devastating as it prevents
these communities from advancing and progressing. After considering the depth of work needed to truly make a measureable impact, AGC Executive Director,Wendy Raquel Robinson vowed to continuously improve AGC so that it becomes a community beacon in
improving academic and social behavioral outcomes for youth in South Los Angeles andfacilitating their graduation well prepared for college and career. Funding through a grant for Preparing Achievers fro Tomorrow has served as a blessing in helping AGC resource the expertise necessary to inform, develop and update its strategic plan so it can better and more effectively serve these youth. Whileassistance is sought in improving and updating every aspect of the plan, there is particular interest in thefollowing: (1) theory of change – clearly outlining our why and how; (2) outcomes to be achieved –clearly delineating our purpose and desired results; (3) necessity/rationale for outcomes – providing
reputable explanations for our strategy and approach; (4) target population – understanding who we do and do not serve; (5) being SMART – creating specific, measureable, achievable, relevant and time‐framed objectives; and (6) measuring for impact – using learning and evaluation to inform correction, facilitate continuous improvement and effectuate change.
MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION DEVELOPMENT: It seems as if the individuals and entities who desire to know about you the most, hear or learn about you the least. AGC desires to explore ways to “get the word out” to those who are most interested in either taking advantage of or supporting our efforts. CREATE SUCCESSION/TRANSITION PLAN: AGC relies heavily on the celebrity, vision, passion, empathy and
commitment of Wendy Raquel Robinson to secure funding and support. While this strategy has servedthe organization well, it is not sustainable. Prudent management prescribes effective succession
Amazing Grace Conservatory's planning has helped to build strong leadership and through that causes review & examination of current goals. This type of planning requires an enhanced level of expertise and a devotion of time and energy that is not supported by the agency’s current budget. Therefore, AGC will benefit significantly from continued funding that serves as a springboard to develop staff positions as support to achieve these goals. With asstance fro the Riordan leadership Instititue we were able to provide support in these areas through a resources that provided a fellowship candidate to assist in our developing and initital implementation phase of our visioning and strategic plan, the assigned fellow has remained involved and serves as an Advisor to our Board of Directors.

Financials

Amazing Grace Conservatory
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Amazing Grace Conservatory

Board of directors
as of 12/5/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Wendy Raquel Robinson

Amazing Grace Conservatory..

Term: 2006 -


Board co-chair

Jacquelyn Honore-Elam

Amazing grace Conservatory

Term: 2008 -

George Weaver

Brotherhood Crusade

Isadore Hall

State Senator (retired)

Jacquelyn Honore-Elam

Amazing Grace Conservatory

Kathryn Robinson

Registered Nurse (retired)

Mechel Elam

Dept of General Services

Tracy Dennis

Chase Bank

Arthur Lewis

Kohl's International