HOPE CLUBHOUSE OF SOUTHWEST FL INC

Changing lives through Hope

aka Hope Clubhouse   |   Fort Myers, FL   |  www.hopeclubhouse.org

Mission

Hope Clubhouse is a community of support for anyone living with a mental illness seeking opportunities for paid employment and access to education, housing and wellness.

Ruling year info

2007

Chief Executive Officer

Erin Broussard

Main address

3602 Broadway

Fort Myers, FL 33901 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

30-0437443

NTEE code info

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Funding has not returned to pre COVID-19 levels. We are diligently working to diversify our funding streams. Focusing on building our corporate giving and creating a planned giving segment.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Hope Clubhouse

Provides opportunities for paid employment and access to education, housing assistance, and wellness programs.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Unemployed people

Where we work

Accreditations

Clubhouse International 2022

Affiliations & memberships

Clubhouse International 2022

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Hope Clubhouse has occupied the same 2,700 square feet of space since 2010. This is the square footage of a house for a family of four. Yet in 2021, the Clubhouse served 205 unduplicated members, provided 21,676 hours of training and skill building, which included aiding with obtaining paid employment and access to education, housing, food, and wellness. Additionally, the Clubhouse served 4,749 hot meals, and the Garden of Hope produced 4,710 pounds of produce that was used in the Hope Clubhouse kitchen, taken home by members, or distributed within the Fort Myers and Cape Coral communities.

Due to space limitations, members attend Hope Clubhouse on a first come first serve basis. The remaining members must participate via Zoom, not by choice but by necessity. Keep in mind, both noise and personal space are triggers for many of the people we serve, and several of them are not willing to participate as often based on how crowded the Clubhouse is.

There are approximately 81,000 adults in Lee County who have a diagnosed serious mental illness. To further complicate this situation, Lee County is the second-fasted growing county in Florida. With growth comes an additional population of new residents in need of mental health resources and programs.

Hope Clubhouse has reached its critical inflection point and needs the help of the community to move forward. The solution is a new 10,000-square-foot space. With that, the Clubhouse could accommodate a daily average attendance of 100-125 people without the members feeling crowded.

Hope Clubhouse is an evidence based accredited non-profit organization that provides a community of support for individuals and families living with serious mental illness. It is a membership community built on a work ordered day that emphasizes shared responsibilities between members and staff. This proven model aids in building healthy relationships, communication skills, and trust. The members have opportunities for paid employment, access to education, housing, and wellness. Hope Clubhouse has supported more than 700 members over the last ten years. Services are provided Monday through Friday from 830 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Additional support is provided on weekday evenings, Saturdays, and holidays.

Persons with mental health issues are at greater risk of unemployment, food insecurity, housing instability, and domestic violence. Multiple public health sources have confirmed that COVID-19 created new or worsening barriers for people suffering from mental illness while simultaneously creating an entirely new segment of people struggling with their mental health.

Hope Clubhouse works daily to lessen the impact these inequalities have on the day to day lives of our members.

At the beginning of the pandemic the Clubhouse adjusted our service model to meet our members' increased needs. The Clubhouse switched to a hybrid service delivery model (offering in person and Zoom participation options), addressing food insecurity with the creation of DeliveringHOPE meal delivery, and increasing the number of members who had access to virtual connectivity with the creation of HOPEConnects. These programs were created as a direct response to COVID; however, we plan to maintain them indefinitely.

Like most organizations, COVID challenged Hope Clubhouse to do more with less. Increases in isolation and loneliness are indicators that an individual is at risk to also experience increases in mental health symptoms, substance abuse, and even suicide.
Hope Clubhouse Revenues have not returned to their pre-COVID levels. Financial statements from 2020 v. 2019 saw a 28% decrease in funding. While 2021 was better overall, there was still a 7% decline in funding compared to 2019.

We are working diligently to increase and diversify our funding sources to meet the needs of our members.

In 2021, Hope Clubhouse served 205 members providing 21,676 hours of total member training and skill building to included assistance with obtaining paid employment and access to education, housing, food, and wellness. The Clubhouse served 4,749 hot meals. The Garden of Hope produced 4,710 pounds of produce that was used in the Hope Clubhouse kitchen, taken home by members, or distributed within the Fort Myers and Cape Coral communities.
Hope provided housing case management to 167 members and assisted 56 members with becoming gainfully employed. These members collectively earned $702,866 in wages during 2021, which is an 9% increase from 2020. These earned wages created substantial direct economic and societal impact for Southwest Florida.
Members who participate in Clubhouse services have reduced or zero engagements with law enforcement, acute, or emergent mental health service providers.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We complete an annual Clubhouse member survey in conjunction with the Florida Clubhouse Coalition each year. Our daily attendance check out has member satisfaction questions and ability to provide feedback.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    COVID policies have been an ongoing topic for 2 years. The Clubhouse is a membership agency so decisions are made by consensus. For example, this community is 100% vaccinated and opted to make masks voluntary inside the building.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The dynamic of the Clubhouse is already one that is member led and staff supported. Using verifiable means to collect data like surveying and during meetings where consensus is reached has helped members feel empowered that the program is there's and staff are there to support them.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people,

Financials

HOPE CLUBHOUSE OF SOUTHWEST FL INC
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HOPE CLUBHOUSE OF SOUTHWEST FL INC

Board of directors
as of 09/02/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Scott White

Scott White Advisors

Term: 2015 - 2022

Vanessa Tyler

Studio+

Carrie Lucas

Retired/Hope Clubhouse Founder

Dottie Pacharis

Retired/Author

Dr. Omar Rieche

Elite DNA

Kathy Sageer

EssenShea

Daleen O'Dell

Remax Reality

Lance McKinney

Osterhout & McKinney, P.A. Attorney

Gary Myer

Valerie's House

Ryan Benefiel

Web Site Developer

Cassandra Pulice

FineMark Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/15/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.