The Petey Greene Program

aka Petey Greene Prisoner Assistance Program   |   Princeton, NJ   |  www.peteygreene.org

Mission

The Petey Greene Program supports the academic goals of incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people through high-quality volunteer tutoring programs, while educating volunteers on the injustice manifest in our carceral system.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Ms. Alison Badgett

Main address

22 Stockton Street

Princeton, NJ 08540 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

30-0499760

NTEE code info

Services to Prisoners/Families (I43)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

PGP focuses on critical academic gaps predominant among incarcerated people: * 68% of incarcerated people do not have a high school diploma; 40% also lack a high school General Equivalency Degree (Bureau of Justice Statistics). * The implications are particularly stark for African Americans: There is a nearly 70% chance an African American man without a high school diploma will be imprisoned by his mid-thirties (Brookings Institution). * Without a high school credential, unemployment rates are staggeringly high among the formerly incarcerated, from 25% among white men to 60% among African American women (Prison Policy Initiative). * It’s no wonder an estimated 68% of those released from state prisons are rearrested within three years, climbing to 83% within nine years (Bureau of Justice Statistics).

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Volunteer Academic Support for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated People

Since 2008, the Petey Greene Program (PGP) has recruited volunteers—primarily college students—to support the academic goals of incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people. We envision a world in which all incarcerated people have access to high quality academic programs. The Petey Greene Program will inspire our alumni to become advocates, and to take on leadership roles that will reimagine the criminal legal system.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We envision a world in which all incarcerated people have access to high quality academic programs. Since 2008, the Petey Greene Program has been actively working to bring one-on-one tutoring into correctional facilities - and at no cost to prisons or taxpayers.

We want to create leaders who are passionate about changing our criminal justice system and execute on their great promise in future academic and career choices.

We recruit, train, and coordinate volunteers, typically undergraduate and graduate students, to tutor in education programs in prisons and jails. Our training is in GED, Adult Basic Education, post-secondary education, and other academic subject matter, but also stresses cultural and ethical volunteering fine points.
Specifically, we:
1. Prioritize individual needs of of incarcerated students
2. Train volunteers in the skills necessary to tutor a variety of subjects
3. Encourage a positive academic environment grounded in professional and respectful interactions
4. Increase awareness of the positive impact of education in correctional facilities through public relations
Our volunteer tutors model helpful study habits for the incarcerated students

We build strong relationships between the universities and departments of corrections where we work, helping to facilitate meaningful educational programming for incarcerated men and women.
1. In the 29 colleges and 37 correctional facilities in the eight states where we operate, we meet regularly with the principals and develop advocates for our work
2. We track and demonstrate improved operations
3. We analyze and match college campus and correctional facility to optimize our impact and minimize volunteer transportation costs and time
4. We promote the benefits of the experiential learning and develop effective professor and student leaders on our college campuses
5. We have a proven track record for identifying and developing talented volunteers who in turn are excellent role models for future prospects
6. We employ previously incarcerated people who have personal experience that serves Petey Greene well

We set clear Development goals which we monitor weekly.

The Petey Greene Program has developed a strong Board and management team which includes leadership expert in business strategy, marketing, program development, education, and criminal justice reform.

We run a lean organization with 22 staff members who manage our national office and seven regional offices. The Petey Greene Program Manager tracks results, uses data management tools to analyze and continually improve operations, and ensures Petey Greene Program recruits and trains high quality volunteers. We hire formerly incarcerated people with in-depth knowledge of how to work effectively with departments of correction and gain the access we need to furnish supplemental education. A good number of our former college volunteers become Petey Greene Program leaders and serve in Regional Manager and Divisional Manager roles.

Have Accomplished

1. From one college campus and two correctional facilities in New Jersey in 2008, the Petey Greene Program is now active in eight states with 29 college campuses and 37 correctional facilities. Our model is attracting the attention of correctional facilities in other parts of the country seeking to know how a similar program can be started in their area.
2. We have consistently achieved overall growth year-to-year in the number of volunteers recruited and hours of tutoring offered.
3. Retention indicators are excellent. Region by region analysis has identified individual campuses and correctional facilities where support is needed to improve results and meet goals. We also learn from students who leave -- biggest reach is schedule. The student finds conflicts they did not anticipate with classes.
4. Volunteer training evaluations have been favorable - the majority indicate they feel more prepared after completing training
5. Volunteer satisfaction rates with the tutoring experience remains high. Overwhelmingly students report they "would recommend Petey Greene to a friend". They tend to recruit their colleagues who in turn join Petey Greene Program ranks of volunteers
6. Correctional facility administrator ratings of the Petey Greene Program services remain high and we continue to collect anecdotal reports on the positive impact our Program is having on the prison environment and on the academic achievement rates of our students. "As a result of the collaboration between Petey Greene tutors and [Rikers Island] teachers; our students have experienced a noticeable increase on their TABE test; attentiveness in class; an increase in their self-esteem, and a positive view of their future upon release." Shomar Burroughs, Assistant Principal, East River Academy, Rikers Island
7. At Princeton University, the Petey Greene Program has become the leading volunteer experience. We are developing additional examples at our other college campuses
9. Year-to-year Development results have grown substantially from $60,000 in 2014; to $200,000 in 2015. In 2016 we raised nearly $300,000. In 2017, we raised over $550,000. Our development goal in 2018 is over $670,000. The rest of the Petey Greene budget derives from endowments.

Have Not Accomplished

8. Petey Greene has had a difficult time tracking incarcerated student results. Their information is confidential. We are working with our state departments of corrections and correctional facilities to identify ways to assess student results and what success would look like at their facilities. In 2016, we identified a student from our first class at A. C. Wagner held in 2008 -- Erich Kussman. He is working with Petey Greene to develop his and the stories of his cohort so we can share how well the students have fared. Erich Kussman earned a Master of Divinity in Lutheran studies from Princeton Theological Seminary in May 2019.

Financials

The Petey Greene Program
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Petey Greene Program

Board of directors
as of 7/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Lee Gladden

Witherspoon Asset Management

Term: 2021 - 2023

Terrell Blount

Formerly Incarcerated College Graduates Network

Peter Gates

Parthenon-EY, Boston

Jacki Kelly

Friends of the Children New York

Daniel Kowalski

Moody's Investors Service

George McLaughlin II

Entrepreneur

Charles Puttkammer

Founder and Philanthropist

Richard Scribner

RFB&D; Retired

Irwin Silverberg

Cowen Prime Service

Martha Staniford

Wealthspire Advisors

Sarah Walzer

ParentChild+, Inc

David Scott

University Counsel Rutgers University; Retired

Yusuf Dahl

Lafayette College's IDEAL Center for Innovation

Henry Barmeier

The Bridgespan Group

Clare Herceg

MIT Sloan School of Management

Lee Gladden

Witherspoon Asset Management

Beth Brett

Inboxlab

Kimberly Jeffries Leonard, Ph.D.

The Links, Inc. and The Links Foundation, Inc.

Alec Decker

Management Consultant and Leader

Cordelia Puttkammer

Howard University; Retired

Muriel Goode-Trufant

New York City Law Department

Udi Ofer

ACLU

Ray Tebout

NJ STEP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No