Youth Development

Mentors Care

Connecting at-risk high school students with adult volunteers to mentor students toward graduation and purposeful lives

Midlothian, TX

Mission

Mentors Care’s mission is to connect high school students who are at risk of not graduating with mentors, tools, and resources to help lead them toward graduation and purposeful, fulfilling lives. Mentors Care will work with school districts that are historically underserved to enlist, train, and equip adult volunteer mentors who care about and believe in the kids they serve.

Notes from the Nonprofit

MISSION: Mentors Care is a mentoring program that encourages Action, Hope and Future using volunteer mentors from your community to reach “at risk" youth in your school.

Ruling Year

2012

Founder/Executive Director

Mrs. Dena Petty

Main Address

661 E. Main Street, #200-170

Midlothian, TX 76065 USA

Keywords

Mentoring at-risk high school students

EIN

30-0689961

 Number

8374954480

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Citizen Participation (W24)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS Filing Requirement

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

When considering the negative effects of poverty, homelessness, teen pregnancy and addiction among our very own high school students, we must also consider how these negatively impact their peers, teachers, potential employers, and future generations as well as our economy. When we choose to ignore school children who find themselves at a disadvantage, heartbreakingly, they face a lifetime of struggles as adults and our communities are not immune to the negative repercussions. When we fail our children, we fail ourselves. Mentors Care was established in 2009 and now serves more than 250 students as of the 2018-2019 school year. The need for our mentoring program is heartbreaking: LIFE CONDITIONS OF STUDENTS IN OUR PROGRAM (2018-2019) Addictions - 16% Homelessness - 5% Pregnant - 3% Community Service Referral - 37% Alternative School (AEP) - 18% Accel. Grad. Program - 3% Parent Incarcerated - 10%

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

4 8

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Mentors Care

Mentoring

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related program

Mentors Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Number of seniors enrolled in our program that graduated from high school.

Rate of student attendance during the reporting period

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related program

Mentors Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

In 2018-2019 58% (145 total) of all high school students enrolled in our program improved in attendance

Number of students demonstrating responsible behaviors and work habits

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related program

Mentors Care

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Our communities have an outsized population of economically disadvantaged high school students whose needs are not met. These disengaged youths have the highest impact on our high school dropout rate. At this time, Texas’s student attrition rate is at 24%. That means one out of five Texas high school students drops out before graduating from high school. At the same time, as of 2020, 65% of all jobs in the United States will require post-secondary education. At-risk students from rural and suburban communities (our target demographic) have little to no resources available to them although 60% of the students in our Ellis County, TX communities are considered to be economically disadvantaged. WHICH STUDENTS ARE CONSIDERED TO BE “AT-RISK” The term “at-risk” is used in education to identify students who may not graduate from high school due to varying predictive indicators. • Low Attendance • Poor academic performance • Held back from advancing to the next level • Pregnant or is a parent • Placed in alternative education programs • Expelled from school • On probation or in community service • Economic hardships • Homelessness • And more [https://www.texasstudentdatasystem.org/TSDS/TEDS/ESCs_LEAs_Using_PEIMS] Most of these students considered to be at risk have social and emotional needs that school educators and administrators are not equipped or staffed to address and overwhelmed children are dropping out of school due to hopelessness. The overall lack in coping skills plaguing high school students facing these hardships presents a major barrier to their academic success and Mentors Care is a proven solution. 60% Are Economically Disadvantaged; 11,177 Are Homeless; they are disconnected from arents, peers & educators offered few (if any) social programs lack social-emotional support at home and at school. The one-hour-per-week face-time spent between student and mentor is a key component in restoring trust, self-confidence and a change of course for the better among student recipients. When students remain in the program for at least two years, on average, 98% of seniors go on to graduate. At the close of the 2018-2019 school year, 98% of seniors in the program graduated while 85% of all students in the program maintained or progressed in credits earned. Fifty-eight percent (58%) improved in attendance and 51% were connected with other community resources through coordinators. Most of the students experienced major turnarounds in their life's trajectory.

Mentors Care targets underserved high schools in areas where the unique needs of at-risk students are all too often overlooked or neglected and find little or no social services to help support their academic studies. We place a professional, program coordinator within every participating school location. The program coordinator has an office located within the school and is always open to students. We are currently providing mentorship to the following North Texas high schools: Ferris Maypearl Midlothian Midlothian Heritage High School Palmer Red Oak In 2020-2021, we will also bring our program to Advantage Academy in Grand Prairie, Texas. With the consent of the participating students’ parents or legal guardians, school administrators allow Mentors Care’s Program Coordinators access to participating students’ grades and other protected student data and information for Mentors Care’s use in helping to encourage and better ensure the students’ performance and progress. By meeting "at-risk" students in the school library one day a week, our trained and highly-qualified mentors commit time, emotions and efforts to help to participating students overcome the obstacles that might otherwise stand in their way. We provide a safe space in a socially challenging environment where students can grow and share aspects of their lives with caring adults. Our mentors are positive role models and our program coordinators assist students by providing academic guidance as well. Mentors Care helps them find the strength, discipline, and character within themselves that’s necessary to overcome.

Our overall program success rate and longstanding among the North Texas communities speak to our capabilities in this field. This program repeatedly proves to be needed and effective (more and more each year, in fact). 98% of participating seniors in 2018-2019 graduated while more than 85% of participating high school students maintained or progressed in credits earned. A lot of research, collaborating and effort go into making Mentors Care a success, but mostly our success can be attributed to our great North Texas communities for supporting our program for 11 years now. Successful youth make successful community members someday. Over the last 11 years, we have conferred with experts ranging from school violence prevention and social-emotional wellbeing to program development and sustainability. In the last year, three new school districts in North Texas have requested our services and there are currently others knocking at our door because not only is our program needed, but we're the best in our field with TRUE results of success.

We measure our success by accounting for the number of students reaching required credits per year as well as the number of seniors in the program that move on to graduate from high school at the end of each school year. We also consider the number of students in need that we were able to refer to other community resources or programs.

Since our inception in 2009, we have matched more than 1,000 high school students considered to be “at-risk” of not graduating with caring, with successful adults who built them up and encouraged them to achieve academic success. When our program began, we offered mentoring services to one school. As of 2020, we have expanded into a total of seven. Our students have moved into their bright futures as an honor student at Navarro Junior College; attending Community College; a nursing student at Navarro Junior College; a Criminal Justice major at Sam Houston College; a student in art school; a welder; military and the list goes on! As our program’s success catches on, we can expect more local support and even more responsibilities.

External Reviews

Photos

Financials

Mentors Care

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/30/2020

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
Native American/American Indian/Indigenous
Gender Identity
Female

Race & Ethnicity

No data

Gender Identity

No data

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

No data