GIRLS WHO CODE INC

NEW YORK, NY   |  www.girlswhocode.com

Mission

Girls Who Code programs work to inspire, educate, and equip girls with the computing skills to pursue 21 St century opportunities.

Ruling year info

2012

CEO

Dr. Tarika Barrett

Main address

1250 BROADWAY 17TH FLOOR

NEW YORK, NY 10001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

30-0728021

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Computing is where the jobs are — and where they will be in the future, but fewer than 1 in 5 computer science graduates are women. The gender gap in computing is getting worse. In 1995, 37% of computer scientists were women. Today, it’s only 24%. If we do nothing, in ten years the number of women in computing will decrease to just 22%.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Girls Who Code Clubs Program

After-school clubs for 3rd–12th grade girls to explore coding in a fun & friendly environment

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Virtual Summer Immersion Program (vSIP)
2-week virtual Summer Immersion Program primarily synchronous

Self-Paced Program (SPP)
Piloted in Summer 2021, similar projects completed asynchronously

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

College Loops are on campus student organizations led by a President who serves as the main point of contact for Girls Who Code. College Loop Presidents are committed to reaching gender parity in tech by creating an inclusive community on their campus.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Women and girls

A mentorship program that connects college students
with role models at top companies. Small groups
are paired with two female or nonbinary tech industry professions for monthly,
hour-long mentoring sessions.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Women and girls

Two-week virtual program that introduces college-aged women to career pathways in technology. Participants are able to learn about internship or entry-level opportunities, connect with potential mentors and sponsors in the industry, and develop their networking skills.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Women and girls

A virtual, flexible event designed to connect the Girls Who Code community with internship and job opportunities in the technical workforce, and to connect hiring managers to a diverse slate of candidates for internships and jobs.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Young adults

Where we work

Awards

Best Nonprofits to Work For 2022

NPT

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Affiliations & memberships

NPT's Best Nonprofits to Work For 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of teachers recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Girls Who Code Summer Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of teachers recruited for Girls Who Code's Summer Immersion Program

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, Adolescents

Related Program

Girls Who Code Clubs Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the combined number of students for all Girls Who Code programs. Please note that the decreases in 2020 and 2021 relate to the impact of COVID-19 on after-school programming.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Girls Who Code works to close the gender gap in technology by educating, inspiring, and equipping girls with the skills and resources to pursue 21st century opportunities. In our first decade we've created the largest pipeline of future female software engineers and computer scientists in the U.S.

Central to our efforts at Girls Who Code is ensuring that more girls have access to Computer Science who would otherwise never gain meaningful exposure. This is particularly true for Black and Latina girls, and those with limited access because of socioeconomic status.

WE BELIEVE —

All girls are creators and able to make a positive impact on the world through computer science.

All girls of varying interests have the ability to be passionate about and interested in computer science.

Graduates of our programs will go on to deepen their CS learning and redefine cultural beliefs around what a computer scientist looks like.

CAPABILITIES
We offer learning opportunities for our students and alumni to deepen their computer science skills as well as their confidence.

CAREER
Our programs create clear pathways for Girls Who Code alumni from middle and high school and college into the computing workforce.

COMMUNITY
We build a supportive sisterhood of peers and role models who help our students and alumni persist and succeed.

Girls Who Code is the only organization in the nation providing high-impact, in-depth computer science education in a supportive environment to girls -- and we're the only organization with outcomes that clearly show our programs are producing significant numbers of college-aged alumni who are interested in STEM fields. We are on track to achieve gender parity in computer science by 2030.

Since launching in 2012, Girls Who Code has reached 500,000 students through our in-person and virtual programming, and 115,000 of our alumni are college or career-aged. We have sparked culture change through marketing campaigns and advocacy efforts, generating 14 Billion engagements globally. In 2019, the organization was named the #1 Most Innovative Non-Profit on Fast Company’s Most Innovative Companies list.

We imagine a world where our computer science classrooms are as diverse as our communities, a world where women in computing have a sisterhood to lean on, a world where that sisterhood creates real change for communities everywhere.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Girls Who Code is an international nonprofit organization working to close the gender gap in technology, and leading the movement to inspire, educate, and equip students who identify as girls or nonbinary with the computing skills needed to pursue 21st century opportunities. Since launching in 2012, Girls Who Code has reached 500,000 students through our in-person and virtual programming, and 115,000 of our alumni are college or career-aged. Our primary audience is female and nonbinary students from 3rd grade through early career.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In spring 2020, we surveyed our current college students and alumni about their needs as a result of COVID and 30% reported that they’d had an internship or job offer rescinded, and 40% of the seniors reported that they were still seeking job opportunities. As a result of this survey, we developed a suite of pre-internship programs as well as a Hiring Summit which we piloted in January 2021. Using feedback from participants and corporate partners, we shifted the next Hiring Summit to September 2021 in order to better align with both corporate hiring schedules and student needs, and we developed a series of pre-Summit workshops to help students develop the skills and confidence needed to make the most of the Summit. As we do with all of the programs, we surveyed participating students after

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    As we described in the response above, our programmatic initiatives are shaped by the feedback we receive from our students and stakeholders, both in terms of needs they identify as well as improvements that can be made in our programming.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

GIRLS WHO CODE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

GIRLS WHO CODE INC

Board of directors
as of 4/1/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Carol Juel

Synchrony

Term: 2021 - 2027

Marissa Shorenstein

AT&T

Reshma Saujani

Girls Who Code

Paul Daugherty

Accenture

Craig Newmark

craigslist & The Craig Newmark Foundation

Bozoma Saint John

Netflix

Juan Sabater

Valor Equity Partners

Jason Spero

Google

Phil Shawe

TransPerfect

Javier Polit

Mondelēz International

Jeanette Gamble

Morgan Stanley

Leyla Seka

Ironclad

Bharat Anand

HBS

Greg Gunn

Lingo Ventures

Kimberly Scott

Arizona State University

Vince Campisi

RTX

Tarika Barrett

Girls Who Code

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/31/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/31/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.