HEAR INDIANA

aka Hear Indiana   |   Indianapolis, IN   |  www.HearIndiana.org

Mission

Hear Indiana creates equal opportunities for children with hearing loss through listening and spoken language.

Ruling year info

1979

CEO

Naomi Horton

Main address

4740 Kingsway Drive Suite 33

Indianapolis, IN 46205 USA

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Formerly known as

The Indiana Association for Hearing Impaired Children

Hear Indiana— The Association for Children with Hearing Impairment

EIN

31-0921774

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (E01)

Ear/Throat (G42)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

To many deaf and hard of hearing children still lag behind their hearing peers. With today's technology (and appropriate therapy) most deaf children can achieve age-appropriate speech, language, and literacy levels. Hear Indiana is a one-stop shop providing all the supports families of children with hearing loss desperately need to put their children on the path to success!

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Speech and Hearing Resource Center

We provide speech and audiology services for children with hearing loss. We have free informational resources in our library and on the web.

Population(s) Served

To address children’s need for a sense of social and emotional well-being, Hear Indiana created our annual Listening and Spoken Language Camp in 1989. Simply put, our camp gives children with hearing loss a group of friends and mentors who are “just like them.”

Population(s) Served

For more than 40 years, Hear Indiana has hosted an educational conference aimed at providing the most up-to-date information to clinicians, teachers, and parents of children with hearing loss. Technology changes rapidly, and it is imperative to provide continuing education.

Population(s) Served

Creating equal opportunities means ensuring children with hearing loss have the services they need to thrive in a mainstream environment. We work with parents, teachers, and schools to provide additional supports and help families understand their special education rights. When requested by parents, we send an advocate to Case Conferences to help communicate the child’s needs. Hear Indiana also knows that parents need social and emotional support, as well. We host a monthly parent INcouragement Night with a relevant speaker, providing an opportunity for parents learn and connect.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

With the help of advanced hearing technologies (i.e. digital hearing aids & cochlear implants), even profoundly deaf children can listen and speak. With appropriate intervention, these children can do everything else that a child, who was born hearing, will do.

Many people simply aren't aware of what is possible for today's deaf child with the appropriate technology and intervention, and we've made it our mission to ask people to reconsider the standards we hold for these children. We know children with hearing loss have the potential to do and be anything they choose.

Today's deaf child can play musical instruments, speak the words “I love you", sing songs with their classmates, succeed in mainstream schools, and more. They have dreams of becoming astronauts, teachers, engineers, doctors, and musicians – just like all other children. Imagine what is possible for these children if each of them had access to the technology and services that can help them achieve their dreams!

Hear Indiana works to ensure that children with hearing loss can do and be anything they choose. To meet this goal, we will help to provide:
• Intervention at the earliest possible moment
• Therapy to improve listening and speaking skills
• Up-to-date, high-quality technology
• Appropriate school setting and services
• Social and emotional support for children and parents
• Ongoing professional and personal development for teachers, providers and parents

Our annual operating budget has grown by leaps and bounds each of the last few years. We have also increased our programs and expanded the services we have always offered. With the help of dedicated staff and a passionate board, we can move mountains!

In 2014, in partnership with Easter Seals Crossroads, Hear Indiana opened the Speech and Hearing Resource Center (SHRC), which offers:
• state of the art pediatric audiology & speech pathology services
• parent encouragement & care coordination
• consultative services to local education agencies

Each year, ~250 families are seen for services at the SHRC. Hear Indiana continues to ensure that all children have access to assistive technology, regardless of income. We also continue to host an annual Listening & Spoken Language Conference.

Our Listening & Spoken Language Camp gives children and teenagers with hearing loss the opportunity to make new friends with shared life experiences. Each summer we host ~65 campers at Listening & Spoken Language Camp, many of whom attend on full scholarships.

Financials

HEAR INDIANA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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HEAR INDIANA

Board of directors
as of 2/18/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Justin Allen

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes