VALLEY INTERFAITH COMMUNITY RESOURCE CENTER

Helping Our Neighbors In Need

aka VICRC   |   Cincinnati, OH   |  www.vicrc.org

Mission

Improve lives by providing emergency resources and social support in partnership with our community and its agencies.

Notes from the nonprofit

Prior to this Executive Director's tenure in 2017, the agency consistently was in the red. With a new financial team finally assembled, lead by a New Treasurer - we have seen those annual losses diminish from 2017 and 2018 to finally achieving two years in a row in the black. A Reserve was started with a goal of 6 months of operational cash - To date we have about $40,000 left to achieve this goal. An investment fund was started in 2019. In 2019, this Executive Director was able to achieve the BBB Accreditation Status for this NPO which it had never received prior. The agency became current in all required filings to the State of Ohio in 2017 and has maintained this effort.

Ruling year info

1989

Executive Director

Mr. John Keuffer III

Main address

420 W Wyoming Ave.

Cincinnati, OH 45215 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

VALLEY INTERFAITH FOOD & CLOTHING

EIN

31-1261322

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

1) Emergency resources • Food pantry • Clothing pantry • Seasonal programs (back to school, holidays) 2) Referral Resources • Law enforcement liaison services • Referral Services to Partner Agencies for Addictions, Mental Health, etc. 3) Crisis prevention and victim advocacy *Victim Advocacy

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Resources

Choice Food Pantry
Choice Clothing Pantry
Seasonal Services: Christmas, Thanksgiving, Easter and Back To School Programs

Population(s) Served
Families

Valley’s Back-2-School program served 914 underprivileged children in August of 2011, a record number! The children received backpacks filled with supplies, a $15 Wal-Mart gift card for shoes, and gently used school clothes or uniforms. In other words, they received everything a child needs to get a successful start for school no matter what their socio-economic status. In addition to building the children’s selfesteem,supplying these essentials also takes a huge burden off of the parents and guardians. This unique programwas made possible by a grant from the Dater Foundation and by over 30 multi-generational volunteers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Holidays are a special time at Valley Interfaith Food and ClothingCenter! Each Christmas season we strive to provide toy and clothing gifts, as well as a holiday food basket, to over 250 families AND another 100 holiday food baskets to clients without children. In 2011 we were able to make the holidays brighter for over 300 families, including more than 900 children, through the three facets of our Christmas Sharing Program.
We could not brighten the holidays for these families without the generous help of our sponsoring congregations and community groups who provide the toy and clothing gifts for children, $15 Target gift cards for teens, and non-perishable food items, as well as countless individuals who give generously of their time and money. The gifts and food baskets are distributed in mid December to needy families who have applied for our Christmas Sharing program, and additionally through our Friday Gift Give-away for families we were unable to include in our regular program.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Agency of the Year 2001

Cincinnati FreeStore/FoodBank

Victim Advocate of the Year 2020

Morton Bard Award NOVA

Torch Award for Ethics 2021

BBB Torch Award for Ethics

Affiliations & memberships

Accredited NANOE Best Practice Agency 2018

BBB Accredidation 2019

BBB Accreditation 2020

BBB Torch Award for Ethics 2021

BBB Accreditation 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Women and girls, Men and boys

Related Program

Emergency Resources

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric is an average over 12 months of individuals served by Valley Interfaith in all services areas.

Number of low-income households who have received utilities assistance to keep the lights, heat and/or water on in their homes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Resources

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We no longer provide funds for Energy Bills/Late Fees as a general practice.

Number of households served with eviction notice or forced displacement

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Resources

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We no longer track this metric as we do not provide assistance for evictions.

Hours of mentoring

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Resources

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric is the cumulative hours of mentoring given to both women and children in our Neighbors Empowered program; a Bridges out of Poverty model program and Financial Literacy

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Resources

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric details number of youth under the age of 18 who received services from Valley Interfaith in all programs including specialized programming. *COVID hit our services hard

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to provide those experiencing cycles of poverty with Emergency Resources and supports to help them live a self-sustaining life.

Valley Interfaith is a community resource center that serves 5,000+ individuals per year in the Mill Creek region of Greater Cincinnati. Located in Lockland, Ohio, Valley Interfaith opened in 1963 and continues to serve its neighbors through a food pantry, clothing pantry, homelessness prevention services, transitional services, and victim advocacy programs. The organization operates with a $1.6M annual budget, with $1M in in-kind donations. Cash gifts amount to $660,000 each year.

Valley Interfaith operates with two full-time staff members, two part-time staff members, and 120 volunteers. These regular volunteers work four-hour shifts once per week, with up to 20 volunteers reporting daily. They assist with professional services (IT support, bookkeeping, and data entry), facility support (maintenance), and operations (intake support, victim advocacy, crisis prevention, pantry support, clothing support, delivery and pickup, and street outreach). Valley Interfaith relies on 1,000 volunteer hours per month. In 2016, community members and businesses donated more than 266,000 pounds of food. Additionally, Valley Interfaith offers opportunities for community groups and schools to volunteer. During one six-month window (January 2017 – June 2017), seven high schools, one grade school, and one Girl Scout group volunteered at the center. During other times, the community supports Valley Interfaith by organizing food and backpack drives, collecting stuffed animals and school supplies, and/or signing kids up for Head Start.

In 2016, Valley Interfaith served 1,878 households, impacting 4,696 individuals. Their services intersect a large area of need: in 2016, 451 clients were youth aged 16-21. Of the 16 and 17 year-old minors, 201 reported being homeless or having experienced homelessness.

With the aforementioned experience and expertise, Valley Interfaith will continue its efforts to reduce homelessness, reduce poverty, and increase referrals for victims of crime. John R. Keuffer, III, Executive Director, will act as project director during the duration of this grant. He will lead staff to expand service offerings to include additional case management and victims services. Kr. Keuffer has been with Valley Interfaith since 2016. Previously, he was the executive director of Lighthouse Youth Services in Cincinnati, Ohio. He's a police chaplain for CPD, an external advisory board member to the City of Cincinnati Police Chief, a member of the State of Ohio's Attorney General's Anti-Human Trafficking Commission, and a certified child care worker. He's also a licensed State of Ohio Chemical Dependency Counselor Assistant and Certified Advanced National Advocate with the National Organization of Victims Assistance.

Valley Interfaith provides resources to help people living in poverty in the Mill Creek Valley area of Hamilton County and Greater Cincinnati. This differentiates the organization from similar organizations since it is the only service provider in the neighborhood. Many clients access Valley Interfaith using public transit, so proximity to their homes is critical to delivering services.

Valley Interfaith recently transitioned from offering emergency services to becoming a more holistic community resource center. The organization added transitional poverty services, crisis prevention services, and victim advocacy services to its existing food pantry and clothing pantry. The organization can better serve its existing clients because those clients already come to the center. Though Valley Interfaith added additional services and plans to hire case managers, victim advocates, and outreach staff, the organization also partners with other community agencies. These partnerships allow Valley Interfaith to focus on its core competencies and goals (emergency services, transitional/sustaining services, victim advocacy) while still assisting clients by referring them to other service providers.

Valley Interfaith also serves a large population. In 2016, the organization served 1,878 households, impacting more than 4,696 individuals. Their services intersect a large area of need: 451 clients were youth aged 16-21. Of the 16 and 17 year-old minors, 201 reported being homeless or having experienced homelessness. These individuals return weekly and monthly to receive food and material assistance. Valley Interfaith serves a diverse population of special needs, including homeless youth, homeless adults, veterans, elderly, and single mothers. In 2016, the organization served individuals ranging from infancy to 95-years-old.

The organization also has a 54-year history of service. Founded in 1963, Valley Interfaith is a steadfast, committed community organization. Its staff turnover rates are extremely low; only three executive directors presided over the organization during the last 54 years. The original program director, hired in 2014, is still on-staff and manages each cohort of the Neighbors Empowered program.

There are more than 250 volunteers each year at Valley Interfaith, with 120 working regular, weekly shifts. This regular commitment allows the organization to utilize financial resources on case management and social services staff since volunteers assist with administration, IT, facility support, and daily operations in the pantry and clothing shop.

The most recently appointed executive director, John R. Keuffer III, is also uniquely qualified to lead Valley Interfaith while the organization expands its services to include crisis prevention, victim advocacy, and increased transitional and sustaining services. Keuffer has a extensive experience and exceptional performance in the area of victim advocacy.

Valley Interfaith provides resources to help people living in poverty in the Mill Creek Valley area of Hamilton County and Greater Cincinnati. This differentiates the organization from similar organizations since it is the only service provider in the neighborhood. Many clients access Valley Interfaith using public transit, so proximity to their homes is critical to delivering services.

Valley Interfaith recently transitioned from offering emergency services to becoming a more holistic community resource center. The organization added transitional poverty services, crisis prevention services, and victim advocacy services to its existing food pantry and clothing pantry. The organization can better serve its existing clients because those clients already come to the center. Though Valley Interfaith added additional services and plans to hire case managers, victim advocates, and outreach staff, the organization also partners with other community agencies. These partnerships allow Valley Interfaith to focus on its core competencies and goals (emergency services, transitional/sustaining services, victim advocacy) while still assisting clients by referring them to other service providers.

Valley Interfaith also serves a large population. In 2016, the organization served 1,878 households, impacting more than 4,696 individuals. Their services intersect a large area of need: 451 clients were youth aged 16-21. Of the 16 and 17 year-old minors, 201 reported being homeless or having experienced homelessness. These individuals return weekly and monthly to receive food and material assistance. Valley Interfaith serves a diverse population of special needs, including homeless youth, homeless adults, veterans, elderly, and single mothers. In 2016, the organization served individuals ranging from infancy to 95-years-old.

The organization also has a 54-year history of service. Founded in 1963, Valley Interfaith is a steadfast, committed community organization. Its staff turnover rates are extremely low; only three executive directors presided over the organization during the last 54 years. The original program director, hired in 2014, is still on-staff and manages each cohort of the Neighbors Empowered program.

There are more than 250 volunteers each year at Valley Interfaith, with 120 working regular, weekly shifts. This regular commitment allows the organization to utilize financial resources on case management and social services staff since volunteers assist with administration, IT, facility support, and daily operations in the pantry and clothing shop.

The most recently appointed executive director, John R. Keuffer III, is also uniquely qualified to lead Valley Interfaith while the organization expands its services to include crisis prevention, victim advocacy, and increased transitional and sustaining services. Keuffer has a extensive experience and exceptional performance in the area of victim advocacy.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve people experiencing significant if not extreme poverty cycles. We serve approximately 45% Caucasian and 45% African-American, with about 10% of other race/ethnicities. We just completed a Stakeholder's assessement.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The pandemic and the BLM Movement has shown that communities are dealing with trauma. It's become apparant that we as an agency serving in a diverse community need to: 1. Look at our diversity 2. Listen and engage the community 3. Ask the community what they need rather than assume their needs.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The process has been very well. We are working on collecting emails of clients so we can have a client only email database to alert clients of new services, hours, programs and to get feedback.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

VALLEY INTERFAITH COMMUNITY RESOURCE CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

VALLEY INTERFAITH COMMUNITY RESOURCE CENTER

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr Rob sHANK

Jackson Lewis PCC

Term: 2021 - 2024

Skip Koesterman

Keller Williams

Jan Harper-Jackson

Buckeye Health

Ed Maynard

Cox Financial

Robert Shanks

JacksonLewis

Leslie Joseph

Retired

Noelle Beyer

513 Neighborhoods

Kurt Marty

Marty Advisors

Ethan Shafer

Veterans Administration

John Thomas

Terracon

Sandra Mitchell

Avondale Community Council

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/28/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.