Ohio Energy Project

Sparking curiosity about energy

Worthington, OH   |  https://ohioenergy.org/

Mission

Inspire leadership and energy innovation in Ohio students and teachers.

Notes from the nonprofit

Energy is universal, and science is for everyone. It is this North Star that guides OEP to continuously provide innovative STEM programs and essential learning materials at no cost to teachers and students across the Buckeye State. OEP bands together with our community, generating the critical support necessary to educate and empower the tens of thousands of Ohioans we engage each year. But even with all of this enthusiasm and determination, OEP understands that it is only possible to transform tomorrow if we stick together, united in common cause. It is imperative that we forge forward alongside community partners and advocates who believe that the pathway to tomorrow must be grounded in education, science, and meaningful investment in our next generation.

Ruling year info

1991

Executive Director

Shauni Nix

Main address

200 E Wilson Bridge Rd

Worthington, OH 43085 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-1305046

NTEE code info

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

From waking up for the morning commute to sitting down for dinner, energy plays an often invisible yet vital role in the functionality and comfort of daily life. But energy does not exist in a vacuum and there are very real and far-reaching impacts of energy usage. OEP aims to illuminate those impacts through dynamic programming that equips learners to not only understand energy as an academic science but also as an everyday necessity.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

e3 Smart

e3 Smart is a science-based, standards-designed study of all things energy–where it comes from, how we use it in our daily lives, and how our own behaviors can help us save both the planet and our pocketbook. OEP’s innovative school-to-home approach connects textbook science with real-world experiences. In the classroom, students learn all about energy science, efficiency principles, and conservation practices through hands-on labs and activities designed to promote teamwork, develop critical thinking, and spark curiosity for a lifetime of learning. Students then put their knowledge to the test at home, teaching their families, peers, and communities about the importance of energy and its efficient use.

Population(s) Served

Energy 101 is a professional development program for teachers designed to build confidence in STEM and ignite passion for energy science. Each workshop is designed to meet specific grade level standards in energy science all the while providing educators the training, teacher-designed curriculum, and tools necessary to catalyze their classroom.

Population(s) Served

A hands-on study of wind energy, KidWind is a program that empowers students in grades 7-12 to work in teams using the engineering design process. Tasked to design a wind turbine that produces maximum power, students are challenged to design, build, test, and improve turbine blades all the while learning more behind the science of this renewable energy source.

Population(s) Served

Get wild about wind! MacGyver is a hands-on study of wind energy that encourages grade 3-6 students to design their very own wind turbine. Using the engineering design process, students will work in small groups to design a turbine that can lift a cup of pennies, learning all about this renewable energy source along the way.

Population(s) Served

In order to transform tomorrow, students need to see themselves in STEM. Today, more than six million people work in energy across the U.S., and the field is growing rapidly. From innovators and engineers exploring new ways to harness power to line workers and technicians managing the industry’s operations, opportunities abound in energy. Connecting classrooms to career pathways, OEP's Careers in Energy highlights the critical industries and professionals powering our world through field trip opportunities and behind-the-scenes experiences sure to excite young minds in STEM.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

OANO Standards of Excellence 2017

National Energy Education Program Outstanding State Program 2010

Awards

Energy Efficiency Leadership 2016

AEP Oho

Excellence Award 2012

Ohio Association of Non Profits

Environmental Education Council of Ohio, Organization Award 2011

Ohio EPA

Governor’s Energy Smart Community Challenge 2002

Ohio Government

Outstanding Project Environmental Impact Education 2008

Ohio EPA

National Energy Champion 2001

US Department of Energy

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Affiliations & memberships

National Energy Education Project 1991

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Through the lenses of literacy, leadership, and sustainability, OEP aims to empower teachers, students, and communities to take charge of their energy future through energy education today. To continue this work in thousands of classrooms across Ohio, OEP aims to foster and expand partnerships at the local, state, and national level.

To continue this work in thousands of classrooms across Ohio, OEP aims to foster and expand partnerships at the local, state, and national level. Through partnership, OEP will not only have the financial flexibility to expand programming throughout communities across Ohio but also will have access to diverse resources and expertise that will strengthen our current offerings.

OEP has a dedicated team working to expand partnerships and sustain the organization. OEP also has a dedicated team working directly with classrooms to ensure the success of OEP programming in the field. OEP also relies on a group of committed volunteers to support our endeavors to reach out to the community and expand our impact across the state.

Since its inception, OEP has grown from offering one program to a small group of teachers in Central Ohio to offering four dynamic programs to communities across the entire state. Each year, OEP serves hundreds of teachers, thousands of students, and tens of thousands of Ohioans in energy learning with a goal of expanding that impact with each year. Currently, OEP is working to diversify our program offerings and has plans to expand our programming suite to five programs in the coming years.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Ohio Energy Project (OEP) has been serving students, teachers, and communities since 1988. Offering hands-on science programs to learners of all backgrounds, OEP serves tens of thousands of Ohioans annually in energy education. School budgets should not be barriers to science. With this in mind, OEP offers all programming free of charge to eliminate barriers to entry and ensure all learners have access to critical content poised to spark curiosity about energy. And to ensure energy education equity, OEP focuses much of its efforts on under-resourced school districts and communities by prioritizing programming in schools reporting a free or reduced lunch rate of 50% or higher.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    With a shifting classroom environment, one concern many teachers voiced was the need for more digital support. Whether teaching in person, hybrid, or remotely, many teachers shared that digital resources and tools are necessary for efficient instruction. To better support our teachers and schools, OEP customized and implemented the Canvas Learning Management System--an online classroom management system that allows teachers to organize all of their OEP content digitally and share curriculum, activities, videos, etc. with students and families at the click of a button. This resource has been well received with many teachers sharing that this platform allows them to seamlessly integrate OEP curriculum into their lesson plans no matter the classroom environment.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    OEP is proud to provide a comprehensive, standards-based curriculum that was designed by teachers for teachers. In order to uphold these standards, feedback is critical from the educators we serve. Through an extensive survey and evaluation process conducted at the end of each program year, OEP provides teachers the opportunity to make suggestions, voice concerns, and truly shape the curriculum and materials provided to them. As a result of this process, OEP teachers feel ownership over the curriculum and programs they participate in, resulting in a high retention rate year after year. Because of this, OEP has fostered long-term relationships with thousands of teachers across Ohio.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Ohio Energy Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Ohio Energy Project

Board of directors
as of 06/01/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

President Devin Parram

Bricker & Eckler, LLP

Term: 2021 - 2022


Board co-chair

Vice-President Chris Monacelli

Westerville Electric Division

Term: 2021 - 2022

Barry Schumann

American Electric Power

TJ Faze

Vertiv

Keelie Gustin

Miami Valley Community Action Partnership

Dale Arnold

Ohio Farm Bureau Federation

Courtney Freyhauf

NOPEC

Jeanne Gogolski

Education Projects

Holly Karg

American Municipal Power

Jill Kocher

Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

Scott Potter

The Ohio State University

Ryan Stredney

Columbia Gas of Ohio

Tim Street

Ohio's Electric Cooperative

Stjepan Vlahovich

Ground Level Solutions

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/11/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/05/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.