GOLD2022

Communities In Schools of Ohio

In schools to keep kids in school.

aka Communities In Schools of Ohio   |   Columbus, OH   |  http://ciskids.org

Mission

Communities In Schools’ mission is to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life.

Ruling year info

1993

CEO

Ms. Amy Gordon

Main address

6500 Busch Blvd #105

Columbus, OH 43229 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-1390077

NTEE code info

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CIS Site Coordinators

For 14.5 million children in America living in poverty, challenges outside the classroom, like the lack of adequate food, clothing, shelter, and health care, can stand in the way of success inside the classroom. At Communities In Schools, we work in schools to remove those barriers by building one-on-one relationships and providing integrated student supports to at-risk students, that empower them to stay in school and succeed in life. Whether it is clean clothes, help with school work, or emotional support to help a child cope with and recover from a traumatic event, we connect students with the relationships and resources they need to succeed.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Students

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Many students and their families have a hard time accessing and navigating the maze of public and private services. There may be ample resources in a community, but rarely is there someone on the ground who is able to connect these resources with the schools and students that need them most. Through a school-based coordinator, we bring community resources into schools to empower success for all students by removing barriers for students at risk of dropping out, keeping kids in schools and on the path to graduation and leveraging evidence, relationships and local resources to drive results.

Communities In Schools brings support and resources to the schools in their community by doing the following:

Conducts an assessment of the community to determine the need for CIS
Partners with school district leadership to identify where CIS can have the greatest impact
Hires, trains, and assigns a site coordinator to a school in need
Partners with the school districts, local agencies, businesses, and foundations to garner support for the organization and its work
Mobilizes community resources to address academic and non-academic barriers
Continuously evaluates their work at all levels to ensure progress is made and goals are met

The site coordinator fills a pivotal role as the single point of contact working inside the school coordinating and providing integrated student supports. They work with school leadership and staff to connect students and families with community resources that help to address both academic and nonacademic needs, allowing students to show up healthy, safe, and prepared to learn

Through conversations with school leadership and review of school improvement plans, the Communities In Schools site coordinator and their school support teamwork to align goals that best meet the needs of the students, avoiding duplication and overlap of supports. When site coordinators actually begin providing supports, they collaborate with community partners and businesses to recruit volunteers for tutoring programs, build up clothing closets with support from local businesses or connect struggling families with much-needed medical attention – just to name a few.

We find that when we bring the right people to the table, we are able to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life.

Quarter 1 Data:

Total Schools: 41
Total Active Schools Quarter One : 35
Active School Enrollment : 23,096
Case Managed Students: 1,217
Saturation: 5%
Tier 1 Supports & Basic Needs
907 Supports
4,351 Parent Engagements (duplicated)
2,638 Items Distributed (clothing, food, school supplies)
Top Tier 1 & Basic Needs & Supports
• 36% Enrichment & Motivation ( school duties and groups)
• 28% Behavioral Interventions/ Modifications
• 10% Family Engagement
• 55% Food Assistance
• 24% Clothing Assistance
Progress Monitoring : School Goals (# of schools tracking)
Academics (11)
Attendance (34)
Behavior (16)
School Climate (16)
College and Carrer (2)
Progress Monitoring : School Goals Quarter 1 Results
• 100%Progressing/stable in Academics
• 86% Progressing/ stable in Attendance
• 87% Progressing/ stable in Behavior
• 94% Progressing/ stable in School Climate
• 100% Progressing/ stable in College and Carrer Readiness
CIS Student Snapshot
Top Tier II and III Supports
• Tier II
• 39% Life/ Social Skills ( mentoring, social- emotional learnng, relationship skiils, communication skills)
• 19% Case Management (progress monitoring, student advocacy)
• 18% Behavioral Interventions/ Modifications (attendance monitoring, classroom behavior modification)


• Tier III
• 41% Case Management (progress monitoring, student advocacy)
• 33% Behavioral Interventions/ Modifications (attendance monitoring, classroom behavior modification)
• 9% Life and Social Skills (mentoring, social- emotional learnng, relationship skiils, communication skills)
Progress Monitoring: Student Goals
Academics
Attendance
Behavior
Social – Emotional Learning
College and Career Readiness
Progress Monitoring : Student Goals Quarter 1 Results
• 61% Progressing/ stable in Academics
• 67% Progressing/ stable in Attendance
• 68% Progressing/stable in Behavior
• 82% Progressing/stable in Social- Emotional Learning
• 70% Progressing/stable in College Readiness

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome

Financials

Communities In Schools of Ohio
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Communities In Schools of Ohio

Board of directors
as of 01/06/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Betsy Walker

Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption

Term: 2021 - 2022

Betsy Walker

Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption

Adam Gough

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Jennifer Mundorf

Big Lots

Dennis Sparks

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Steven Williams

Spectrum

Tim Rieder

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Moniqua Spencer

US Bank

Erick Carter

Bread Financial

Wendy Sherman Heckler, PhD

Otterbein University

Abigail Barr

Ice Miller LLP

Natalie Grayson

South-Western City Schools

Bridget Tanler

Cardinal Health

Bessie Kitto

Grange Insurance

Chanel Norton-Lee

Huntington National Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/22/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.